Events

Saturday, October 20, 2018 9:30 AM2:30 PM
Sign up for Save the Harbor's "Share the Harbor" fall cruise to Spectacle Island on Saturday October 20th with Boston Harbor Now, the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the National Park Service. Please arrive at 9:30am at the World Trade Center dock to check in. We will board the Bay State Cruise Company's flagship Provincetown II at 9:45am. The boat will leave promptly at 10:00am whether or not you are on it! Guests will return to the dock at 1:30pm to return to Boston by 2:30pm. Please note that the Boston Harbor Islands National & State Park enforces a carry on, carry off policy: please bring a bag for your trash and dispose of it back on the boat.
Sunday, October 21, 2018 5:00 PM6:00 PM
Fog x Macbeth brings Shakespeare's tragedy of political ambition, blood, and flawed humans into the landscape of the Arnold Arboretum, and the art and shifting atmosphere of Fujiko Nakaya's fog sculpture. The play's live site-specific performance will resonate with Frederick Law Olmsted's landscape design and Fog x FLO, Nakaya's fog installation throughout Boston's Emerald Necklace park system. Witches, murder, intrigue: all will be revealed in the fog...or will it? All seating is free and on the lawn. Bring a blanket, a low chair, and a picnic.
Monday, October 22, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
In advance of Liza Jessie Peterson's The Peculiar Patriot, join ArtsEmerson, The Museum of African American History, and the Suffolk County Sheriff's Department for a public dialogue with Liza Jessie Peterson, Suffolk County Sheriff Steve Tompkins, moderated by Lizzy Cooper Davis. Together, they will examine Liza's idea of "Peculiar Patriotism" practice: resisting status quo and advocating for what is right by supporting and loving those the criminal justice system has deemed "guilty."
  • African Meeting House at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617.824.3063
  • web: www.artsemerson.org
  • email: Kevin_becerra@emerson.edu
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Jewish ritual and custom are a wise, compassionate pathway through the pain and darkness of caring for the dying, burying the dead, mourning, and comforting the bereaved. Join author Anita Diamant as she explores how the time-honored ritual of saying Kaddish can be a meaningful source of comfort in the 21st century. Reception to follow. In connection with the exhibit, "Memorials and Mourning: Material Expressions of Grief," on display at New England Historic Genealogical Society now through November 16.
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 12:00 PM1:00 PM
When they survive, headstones can offer important clues to understanding the lives of those who came before us. Join author of "A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries," NEHGS Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert to learn how these memorials, from the type of the stone used to the carvings to the position of the family plot to the burial documents left behind, can shed new light on your ancestor's life.
Thursday, October 25, 2018 6:00 PM8:30 PM
Who is safe and welcome here? Join us for an evening exploring the history of welcoming and exclusion in Cambridge, from its founding to the present day. Hear from local experts and join a conversation around these urgent questions: How have immigrants been welcomed and not welcomed in Cambridge? How does the local sanctuary movement, and our status as a sanctuary city, define who we are? How can our local history help us understand what's needed now? What are key moments in the city's past highlighting contention around immigration? What's our role in creating a welcoming city and upholding a neighborly social contract? Featuring a storytelling intro by ENROOT students, sharing their experiences as newcomers.
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Join Mass Humanities in conferring the Governor's Award upon three exemplary honorees whose public actions have been grounded in an appreciation of the humanities and have enhanced civic life in the Commonwealth. The honorees: Ellen Dunlap, David Harris, Nancy Netzer, and David Tebaldi. Reception begins at 5:00 PM, followed by dinner and The Governor's Awards in the Humanities.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 3:30 PM5:00 PM
This year's forum will explore the role of the humanities in addressing what many consider the most urgent challenge facing the world today. As our nation was founded, debates arose on how to achieve the proper balance of power between (among others) a more landed aristocracy and laboring citizens; between a central executive, a representative legislature, and the courts; between educated experts and ordinary voters; between private interests and the public good. History has proven the American system of government to be remarkably resilient managing difficult crises and serving as a model for other emerging democracies throughout the globe. Some question, however, whether our current national and international institutions can solve the looming global environmental challenges of our time. It is impossible to debate potential solutions if we cannot first define the problem. This forum will feature historians, scientists, policy makers, activists and, we hope, a cross section of the general public.
Sunday, November 4, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Women played an important role in the Brook Farm transcendentalist community in the 1840s, where they enjoyed rights and privileges equal to the male members. After the demise of Brook Farm, many became active in the suffrage and abolitionist movements. In this living history presentation, you will meet Margaret Fuller, Sophia Ripley, and other remarkable women associated with Brook Farm. How did they understand and live the social contract at Brook Farm? Then, join a discussion of the social contract in the 21st century. What are our rights and responsibilities as members of a diverse community? Dr. Kerri Greenidge, co-director of the African American Trail Project at the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, will guide the discussion.
  • Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, room L2
  • Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-694-6407
  • web: www.newbrookfarm.org
  • email: info@newbrookfarm.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In the shadow of the Holocaust, what is the world's continuing responsibility to prevent genocide and mass atrocity crimes and hold accountable those who commit them? In recent decades genocide and mass atrocities have been committed in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, Darfur, Libya and Syria, among other places. The world stood by and did nothing in several of these situations, but intervened in others under the UN doctrine of responsibility to protect. Today, nationalism and authoritarianism are on the rise, the US has withdrawn from human rights leadership, and support for implementing the responsibility to protect has diminished in the UN. John Shattuck is a former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor who participated in the successful international effort to end the genocidal war in Bosnia, and helped establish the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.
Thursday, December 13, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
Friday, December 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
  • Charlestown Working Theater, 442 Bunker Hill St.
  • Charlestown, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.actorsshakespeareproject.org/plays-events/macbeth/
  • cost: $10 for adults; $5 for youth under 21; free for any patrons facing financial hardship
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, December 15, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
  • Charlestown Working Theater, 442 Bunker Hill St.
  • Charlestown, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.actorsshakespeareproject.org/plays-events/macbeth/
  • cost: $10 for adults; $5 for youth under 21; free for any patrons facing financial hardship
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

There are currently no exhibits according to those search criteria.

Back to the top!