Events

Thursday, April 27, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Drawing upon original documents, including orders, field messages, and the letters and memoirs of the soldiers themselves, some of which have never been used before, author Gene Fax will share the engrossing story of the 79th Division's bloody involvement in the final months of World War I and explore the role of American Jews in the Division.
Saturday, April 29, 2017 4:00 PM6:00 PM
Stand Against Racism is a signature campaign of YWCAs across the country to build community among those who work for racial justice and to raise awareness about the negative impact of institutional and structural racism in our communities. This campaign is one part of our strategy to fulfill our mission of eliminating racism. This year at the YWCA Cambridge we are hosting a reception which will build off of the Celebration of Cambridge's Trailblazing Women wherein we will be launching a black and white photo exhibit of women of color who are change makers in the Cambridge area. We hope you can join us in honoring women of color who are leading change in our community as you network with local leaders in the business, nonprofit, education, tech, and government sectors. We will also be taking head shot photographs of guests for a donation to YWCA Cambridge. There will be live music and refreshments at the event.
  • 7 Temple St
  • Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.ywcacam.org
  • cost: free
Sunday, April 30, 2017 9:30 AM4:30 AM
Research your ancestry long enough and you're bound to hit a brick wall -- the paper trail vanishes, the family seemingly disappears, and you're unable to go back to earlier generations. Whether you are struggling to find an immigrant's exact origins, uncover a maiden name, determine parentage, or discover where a family moved to, cluster research can help. The Research Services team at New England Historic Genealogical Society is routinely contracted to solve such genealogical mysteries. In this full-day seminar, our experts will teach you valuable organizational tips and practical strategies to circumnavigate common genealogical brick walls and enrich your understanding of an ancestor's life.
Monday, May 1, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Monday, May 1, 2017 Monday, October 30, 2017
From the golden dome of the State House to the elegant homes of Louisburg Square, the Beacon Hill tour travels picturesque streets, highlighting examples of early American architecture with particular emphasis on the work of Charles Bulfinch. Experience Beacon Hill's ornate past, from its rural beginnings to the vision of the Mount Vernon Proprietors, while walking among this historic collection of Federal and Greek Revival row houses. You will also hear the stories of Boston's prominent citizens who have called Beacon Hill their home. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Wednesday, May 3, 2017 7:00 PM9:00 PM
"The crisis of leadership in the white community is remarkable - and terrifying - because there is, in fact, no white community." by James Baldwin. King's Chapel Christian Unitarian Church invites the public to a three-part series titled: Racial Justice: Addressing Whiteness. The first is an Open and Honest Communal Reading and discussion of James Baldwin essay "On being White and other Lies". Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments provided.
  • King's Chapel Parish House, 64 Beacon Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-227- 2155 ext. 108
  • email: administrator@kings-chapel.org
  • cost: Free
Thursday, May 4, 2017 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Stonehill College's Professor of Sociology and former president of the Association for Humanist Sociology COREY DOLGON for a discussion of his latest book, "Kill It to Save It: An Autopsy of Capitalism's Triumph over Democracy." "Kill It to Save It" lays bare the hypocrisy of contemporary US political discourse, documenting the historical and theoretical trajectory of capitalism's triumph over democracy.
Friday, May 5, 2017 2:00 PM
Unlike the casual, chaotic way in which early Boston was laid out, the streets of Back Bay are arranged in an orderly grid. Renowned for its elegant homes, the architectural marvels of Copley Square, and its signature stately boulevard, Commonwealth Avenue, the Back Bay is one of Boston's most charming neighborhoods. On this tour you will learn how the Back Bay, once an actual body of water, was filled in and how the neighborhood was developed in the mid-1800s to become one of America's richest collections of art and architecture. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Friday, May 5, 2017 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School faculty and Boston Museum of Fine Arts educators as we explore works in the collection that relate to the experience of illness and our mortality -- through the lens of poetry and storytelling. Creative self-expression through the arts has always been indispensable to how we make sense of our bodies and our suffering, and is perhaps even more important in this moment of ascent technologies and the growing power of science. How do great works of the imagination help doctors to be better healers? How do they challenge us to find strength in ourselves as we confront disease? These questions and more will be the subjects of our own writing as we reflect on what we see. Participants will have an opportunity to explore the MFA art galleries and take part in two activities focused on close looking, teamwork, and empathy. Each group will be co-facilitated by an art educator and medical educator. Throughout, we will share examples of how these programs have resonated with other medical practitioners. A welcome reception for participants and delegates to the Hippocrates Symposium on Poetry and Medicine will follow. After the reception enjoy time on your own in the MFA galleries or grab a bite to eat in one of the MFA's restaurants.
Friday, May 5, 2017 3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Harvard religious history scholar BENJAMIN W. GOOSSEN for a discussion of his book, "Chosen Nation: Mennonites and Germany in a Global Era." During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the global Mennonite church developed an uneasy relationship with Germany. Despite the religion's origins in the Swiss and Dutch Reformation, as well as its longstanding pacifism, tens of thousands of members embraced militarist German nationalism. "Chosen Nation" is a sweeping history of this encounter and the debates it sparked among parliaments, dictatorships, and congregations across Eurasia and the Americas.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 Saturday, October 28, 2017
By the mid-nineteenth century, Boston had earned the nickname "The Athens of America," as an important center for literature and as home to many of America's greatest writers. This literary tour highlights the homes and haunts of such prominent Victorians as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Charles Dickens, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Collectively, they made Boston the epicenter of American letters. What brick building went from being an apothecary's shop to the headquarters of literary Boston? What was the Saturday Club and where did they meet? For answers to these questions and more, join your guide for a stroll through Boston's literary history. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 8:00 AM5:00 PM
The 2017 International Symposium will include lectures, round-table discussions, and poetry readings. There will be talks, discussion panel, and poster sessions on historical and contemporary themes, illness and poetry, poetry as therapy, poetry in the education of health professionals, and poetry as an aid to health professionals. Symposium faculty includes: Neal Baer (writer and producer of Emmy award-winning US television show ER: judge); Jorie Graham (Harvard University, USA, judge); Jackie Kay (Newcastle University, UK: judge); Owen Lewis (Columbia University, New York City, USA: judge); Maya Catherine Popa (New York City, USA: judge).
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Friday, May 12, 2017 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome author NINA SANKOVITCH for a discussion of her latest book, "The Lowells of Massachusetts: An American Family." The Lowells of Massachusetts were a remarkable family. They were settlers in the New World in the 1600s, revolutionaries creating a new nation in the 1700s, merchants and manufacturers building prosperity in the 1800s, and scientists and artists flourishing in the 1900s. For the first time, Nina Sankovitch tells the story of this fascinating and powerful dynasty in "The Lowells of Massachusetts."
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Sunday, May 14, 2017 6:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome STEPHEN KENNEDY SMITH and DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, editors of "JFK: A Vision for America," for a panel discussion on this new compendium of JFK's most important speeches. The book's editors will be joined by contributors Ambassador SAMANTHA POWER and RON SUSKIND for a discussion moderated by historian FREDRIK LOGEVALL. The event will include a book signing with the editors.
Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Explore the engineered world of Fort Point Channel. On this tour of discovery, you will experience the history and engineering marvels of this industrial waterway that has become the centerpiece of this neighborhood's revival. Fort Point Channel was the most difficult undertaking of the Central Artery/Tunnel Project - the I-90 extension. Since then, the Channel experienced great change. Cleaner water, parks, public docks, hotels, and restaurants have appeared among the historic bridges, buildings, and Gilette's 30MG/day cooling system. This tour focuses on the Channel itself from how it came to be through the activities of the Boston Wharf Company, South Station development, the Central Artery/Tunnel Project, and recent activation efforts. It will feature the workings of its three remaining historic bridges, plus the memories of the Mt. Washington, the rolling bridges at South Station, and the ambitious cofferdam.
Saturday, May 20, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 20, 2017 9:00 AM4:00 PM
Master how to use Italian resources and records on both sides of the Atlantic, learn how to apply for Italian dual citizenship, and gain the tools needed to plan your research trip to Italy. Whether you are just beginning your Italian family history discovery or have been researching for years, you won't want to miss this seminar. Attend lectures, chat with our genealogists, enter to win door prizes, view rare books from our collection, learn more about the Catholic record digitization project, and meet fellow family historians. Let's find our ancestors; let's explore our Italian family roots!
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00 PM
A walk through Boston is a walk through time! The eclectic urban landscape is composed of layers of history whose story is revealed by the clues left behind. The city has aggressively reinvented itself over and over again to accommodate a growing population, the needs of business and industry, public and private transportation and public health and safety. It is engineered. Discover all the layers of Boston and the hows and whys of its changes: the invention of the telephone, the first American subway, the rise and fall of interstate highways, the recovery of the harbor, and perhaps even a forgotten body of water that was once Ben Franklin's favorite swimming hole. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00PM3:00PM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore the Southwest Corridor Park. The Park was the result of protests about the creation of an eight lane highway running through Boston's southwestern neighborhoods. Jamaica Plain's residents played an important role in stopping the planned I-95 and the efforts to create a park out of the razed land. This historical walking tour will follow the path of the park and discuss the changes in landscape to that section of Jamaica Plain and the communities that forced those changes to happen. Free and open to the public. Please note the tour will follow the SW Corridor Park (while it starts at the Jackson Square T stop, the tour will end near the Green St T stop). We invite you to continue the conversation at Doyle's Cafe after the tour, where light refreshments will be on offer (cash bar).
  • Jackson Square T Stop, 240 Centre Street
  • Jamaica Plain, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Friday, May 26, 2017 11:00 AM12:30 PM
Cambridge film studio Interlock Media, in association with Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, is proud to participate in an upcoming panel covering the remarkable life of lesser known feminist Margaret Fuller. A clip from their upcoming documentary on Fuller-the first full length documentary to tell her story-will be screened at the panel. Born in Cambridge Massachusetts in 1810, she was known-amongst many other accomplishments-as: A leading intellectual and the most famous feminist of the 19th century; Closely associated with the transcendentalist movement and their ideals; The first female correspondent for the New York Tribune. An author -- her book "Woman in the Nineteenth Century" is widely considered to be the first extensive feminist work in the United States. Tragically her life was cut short at age 40, when a ship she was traveling on sank off the coast of Fire Island in 1850, perishing while in the prime of her life-leaving many potential accomplishments on the table. Please join us as we delve into the fascinating life of this remarkable woman who was ahead of her time.
  • Westin Copley Hotel, 10 Huntington Ave
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 577-0000
  • email: jonathan.director@gmail.com
  • cost: $90 standard, or $60 for retired faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 27, 2017 4:00 PM
America's oldest neighborhood is a delightful labyrinth of narrow streets and exotic marketplaces. A gateway for immigrants from around the world, the North End is also home to the Old North Church, Copp's Hill Burying Ground, and the Paul Revere House. Isolated from the rest of downtown by the construction of the old Central Artery in the 1950s, the North End remains largely preserved from modern development. Upon entering the North End, you will be greeted by the new North End parks of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway. Walking among the Italian markets and one of Boston's largest collection of colonial buildings, you'll hear the story of a changing neighborhood from the time of Cotton Mather to present day re-gentrification. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 27, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Monday, May 29, 2017 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Everyone knows MIT as a Cambridge institution with a global reputation. But for its first 55 years, MIT called the Back Bay home. 101 years ago, MIT made the move from Back Bay to Cambridge. Join us as we trace "Boston Tech" from its founding to its relocation across the Charles River. This walking tour will feature some of the sites of the original Back Bay campus while discussing the drivers and the drama leading to the construction of its new campus.
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 10:30 AM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 6:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome New Yorker staff writer and acclaimed Harvard historian JILL LEPORE-author of National Book Award finalist "Book of Ages" and "The Secret History of Wonder Woman"-for the paperback release of her latest book, "Joe Gould's Teeth," the tale of her search for the long-lost, century-old manuscript called "The Oral History of Our Time." Joe Gould, a madman, believed he was the most brilliant historian of the twentieth century. So did some of his friends, a group of modernist writers and artists that included E. E. Cummings, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, John Dos Passos, and Ezra Pound. Gould began his life's work before the First World War, announcing that he intended to write down nearly everything anyone ever said to him. "I am trying to preserve as much detail as I can about the normal life of every day people," he explained, because "as a rule, history does not deal with such small fry."
Saturday, June 3, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour Green Street. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain's development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district's residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Saturday, June 24, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 1, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 8, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. Sumner Hill includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as both abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed
Saturday, July 15, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 22, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 5, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society? to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 12, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society?. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. All tours are free to the public and are offered on dates shown. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 19, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 26, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. Sumner Hill includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as both abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed
Saturday, September 2, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, September 9, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, September 16, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour Green Street. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain's development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district's residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, September 23, 2017 11:00AM
?Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society? to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.??
Saturday, September 30, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society?. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.

Exhibits

Friday, July 15, 2016 Wednesday, May 31, 2017
"Picturing Frederick Douglass," the first major exhibition of photographs of the famed abolitionist, promises to revolutionize our knowledge of race and photography in 19th-century America. Many were unpublished, forgotten for decades, and previously unseen by contemporary viewers. Several were taken in Boston. Together, the images trace Douglass's visual journey from self-emancipated man to firebrand abolitionist and elder statesman, and they narrate a photographic autobiography across a half-century of history. Douglass, who was in love with photography, sat for his portrait whenever possible, from his earliest known photograph in 1841 until his passing in 1895. As a result, he became the most photographed American of the 19th century; more photographed than President Abraham Lincoln. Picturing Frederick Douglass offers a visually stunning re-introduction to America's first black celebrity immediately recognizable in his own lifetime by millions.
  • 46 Joy St.
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: maah.org
  • cost: Admission by donation, Mon-Fri 10am-4pm

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