The Public Humanist

Tag Archives | Public Humanist

Still They Persisted: What a 105 Year Old Strike in Lawrence, MA Can Teach Us About Organization and Social Change

Suggesting that the 1912 strike started in a flash over a wage cut diminishes the contributions of the laborers—mostly women and immigrants—who built unity out of diversity.

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Voice Matters in the Land of the Free and Un-free

The immediate challenge to Michelle Obama’s statement about the slaves who built the White House is a very public reminder that words spoken by an African American tongue are still considered suspect.

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Two Homelands: Identities on the Borders

Can one person inhabit two homelands simultaneously? What does it mean to each identity?

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Who are “We”?

We know rather little about the life stories of those we call “them”. More worrisome, what we claim to know often reflects a one-size-fits-all set of negative stereotypes that distances us from and reinforces a distrust and fear of those foreign born.

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Food and Cultural Identity in a Crisis

A Syrian woman cooks Aleppo-style kebab on a platter over a propane stove in her apartment in the southern Turkish city of Kilis, near the border with Syria, in December 2015. Nish Nalbandian

Architectural historian John Tschirch explores the experience of those who lose their tangible heritage yet preserve their cultural identity in food.

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Community Bonds Cannot Be Broken

Families and children who fled violence in Central America during a surge of migration in the summer of 2014 are being targeted by ICE. What are their stories?

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“Hamilton” and My Kids

"Hamilton" in production, photo by Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Sometimes it takes an immigrant’s perspective to recognize what is truly great about the American experiment.

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