The Public Humanist

Tag Archives | Public Humanist

We Are All Racist: Using Storytelling to Overcome Implicit Bias

blind-spot

How can we respond to the recent increase in racism? One way could be to acknowledge our shared implicit bias, then tell stories to help overcome it.

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Why We Read Frederick Douglass Aloud

We reached out to five people actively engaged in organizing their community’s Reading Frederick Douglass event to get their thoughts on why we read his words aloud. Enjoy!

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A Great and Difficult Progressive: W.E.B. Du Bois of Massachusetts

Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Levering Lewis’s speech at the State House commemorating the 150th birthday of sociologist, philosopher, and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois.

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Death in the Afternoon

The bravado shown by white supremacists in Charlottesville this week is supported by the symbols and images of manly Confederate heroes, the same ones that are memorialized in city landscapes and, soon, on popular television.

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Freedom Is Not Free: Examining the Abolition Process in Zanzibar

Zanzibar's Stone Town was host to one of the world's last open slave markets, now memorialized by this artwork that utilizes original slave chains.

In challenging the notion of abolition as the final chapter in a history of slavery, we illuminate the lives of those on the periphery of history whose stories and experiences often go unnoticed.

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Time for a Tree and a Rope

Jim Crow is again in the news and in the media on a regular basis, with recent sightings on state judicial and educational perches.

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What is a Terrorist?: The Difficulty in a Definition

Images via Google news

The standards by which we call someone a terrorist may be part religious and racial discrimination; hesitating to label individual or group violence as domestic terror appears wise when looking into history.

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Voice Matters in the Land of the Free and Un-free

The immediate challenge to Michelle Obama’s statement about the slaves who built the White House is a very public reminder that words spoken by an African American tongue are still considered suspect.

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The Transgender Public School Directive, Frederick Douglass, and the Rhetoric of “The Child”

Living under forms of social and political oppression in our current moment, the trans community seems to be particularly respectful of children’s capacity to make independent, self-authored personal-political claims.

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For Equality Only, We Wish to Contend

Betty Friedan, right, and Kathryn F. Clarenbach of the University of Wisconsin at the second annual National Organization for Women (NOW) in Washington D.C. in 1967.

Massachusetts history contains many feminists who espoused full-humanity for men and women as well as equal political, educational, and occupational opportunities, including some early feminists who challenged traditional definitions of gender.

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