MassHumanities
Search
 
advanced: grants | events
 
hello
.
   
Humanities Events in Massachusetts

Search or browse humanities events happening throughout Massachusetts.  Subscribe to the events calendar!  You choose the region and the method: (1) monthly email, (2) directly to your electronic calendar, or (3) an rss feed.
Submit your humanities event for inclusion in the calendar.

Search ->

Search events happening in Massachusetts, filtering by city, region, and date.

Subscribe ->

Subscribe to the events calendar by email or RSS. Choose the region and the method.

Submit ->

Submit your Massachusetts public humanities event for inclusion in the calendar.

 
Thursday, April 17, 2014 10:00 AMSaturday, August 30, 2014 4:00 PM
"Anonymous Among Us: Images from a New England Potter’s Field"  
Between the beautifully manicured grounds of the Mayflower Hill and St. Joseph’s cemeteries, rise the squat, rusted markers of “potter’s field.” There the dead are numbered, not named, and the stories of how they came to rest in anonymity have been forgotten. In 2011, Raynham artist Karen Callan published a volume of hauntingly beautiful photographs taken in Potter’s Field which now make up our spring exhibition. Open Tuesday-Saturday 10:00 - 4:00.
Old Colony Historical Society
66 Church Green, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)

phone: (508) 822-1622
web: www.oldcolonyhistoricalsociety.org
cost: Free
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 6:00 PM7:00 PM
MAAH Annual Meeting: Dr. Craig Steven Wilder on "Ebony and Ivy"  
Dr. Craig Steven Wilder's new book, "Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities" (New York: Bloomsbury, 2013) is the first of its kind -- a powerful and propulsive study revealing a history of oppression behind the institutions usually considered the cradle of liberal politics. In "Ebony and Ivy," Dr. Wilder lays bare uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy. From a community organizer in the South Bronx to a professor, author and scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Wilder is a rising star in the profession of history whose career trajectory has already earned such recognition as Columbia's University Medal of Excellence.
Museum of African American History: Boston Campus, 46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill
Boston, Middlesex County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 725-0022
web: www.maah.org
email: rsvp@maah.org
cost: Free
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 8:00 PM9:30 PM
Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America  
Premiere of Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America, a new, one-hour documentary chronicling the career and lasting influence of America's premiere landscape architect who designed Boston's Emerald Necklace, New York's Central Park, Biltmore in Asheville, NC among other public and private spaces throughout the United States. The film's producer, Lawrence Hott will be in attendance for a brief Q & A with the audience. Order tickets online or call 1-800-440-6975. Tickets also can be purchased at any MFA ticket desk. Tickets go on sale March 20.
Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 267-9300
web: www.mfa.org/programs/film/frederick-law-olmsted-designing-america
cost: $11 General Admission, $9 for MFA, Boston members and Emerald Necklace Conservancy donors
funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Azorean Roots  
The Old Colony Historical Society, in partnership with the Bristol Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists, is pleased to announce Azorean Immigration to the United States through the Documents of One Family a presentation by Michael Hall, deputy chief genealogical officer of FamilySearch.rnrnThis program will follow the journey of one family from the village of Relva, in São Miguel, Azores to Fall River, Massachusetts, told through the family’s own documents. The history of Azorean immigration to the U.S. will be presented as well as the importance of preserving documents for the use of the family historian and other researchers.
Old Colony Historical Society, 66 Church Green
Taunton, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)

phone: (508) 822-1622
web: www.oldcolonyhistoricalsociety.org
cost: Free
Thursday, April 24, 2014 7:00 PM8:30 PM
The Old Neighborhood  
Thomas Doughton, Senior Lecture for Interdisciplinary and Special Studies, College of the Holy Cross, will discuss the development and unique history of Worcester's black neighborhood, Laurel/Clayton, and its eventual loss due to the urban renewal efforts of the 1960s. This program is part of the Bondage to Belonging lecture series on the regional African American experience in Worcester County.
Worcester Historical Museum, 30 Elm Street
Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
Thursday, April 24, 2014 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Moral Injury: Examining War's Deepest Wound and Darkest Contradiction  
Since antiquity, just war doctrine has provided moral justification for waging war. Intended to limit war, the doctrine oftentimes helps unleash it, as it deeply complicates the moral injury of combatants. The four panelists- including veterans of Vietnam and Afghanistan and two clergy- will ask fundamental questions about just war and moral injury that seldom are addressed. How can there be moral injury in just war? Is it moral, under any circumstances, to sanction killing? How do soldiers in war zones cope with perceived contradictions in just war doctrine? What roles are religious institutions and civilian and military clergy playing (and not playing) to resolve these contradictions and heal the spiritual wounds of war? Can these institutions do better?
Calvin Coolidge Room, Forbes Public Library, 20 West Street
Northampton, Hampshire County, MA (CT Valley)

phone: (413) 253-494
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 26, 2014 11:00 AM1:00 PM
High Notes of Jazz Roxbury  
Following up on the recent oral history project, The High Notes of Jazz Roxbury, Discover Roxbury is excited to present a walking tour of Lower Roxbury's former jazz community during the 1950s. Once known as Boston's "jazz mecca," Lower Roxbury was home to some of the most famous clubs and after-hours venues on the East Coast. Additionally, this neighborhood was home to hundreds of Pullman Porters and was also the stomping grounds for many people who would later become prominent Civil Rights activists. Join us as we walk from Ruggles Station, and along Tremont St and Mass Ave, exploring the unique and complex narratives of this historic community. Many of the narratives included in this walk draw from the body of oral testimonies told by former musicians, residents, club owners, and others. Your guide will weave personal anecdotes, neighborhood memories, and researched analysis into a fascinating tapestry that highlights a forgotten period of Boston and American history. Funded in part by Mass Humanities. Tour runs rain or shine. Meet at Ruggles Station, Tremont St stairway.
Meet at Ruggles Station, Tremont St. stairway
Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 427-1006
web: discoverroxbury.secure.force.com/ticket#sections_a0Fd000000THOGLEA5
email: info@discoverroxbury.org
cost: $15 Adults, $5 Children 12 and Under
Sunday, April 27, 2014 2:00 PM
Slide Lecture: "Making Lowell"  
Dr. David Unger, ATHM’s Director of Interpretation, will talk about his ongoing research on the Locks & Canals Company, the Lowell Machine Shop, and the workers who built Lowell's factories. In the early 19th-century the Locks & Canals Company made a business of building factories. They constructed buildings, setup waterwheels, and made machines. Learn how the Locks & Canals Company and its machine shop evolved from a department in a Waltham textile mill to become the largest engineering company in the country, and about the important role it played in the Industrial Revolution.
American Textile History Museum, 491 Dutton Street
Lowell, Middlesex County, MA (Northeast)

phone: (978) 441-0400
web: www.athm.org
email: info@athm.org
cost: Free with museum admission
Sunday, April 27, 2014 2:00 pm4:00 pm
The Place of Wilderness in New England Regional Cultures.  
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Wilderness Act and Monomoy, the only area in Southern New England designated under the Act, the Atwood House Museum in Chatham in partnership with Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, The Eldredge Public Library, The Chatham Conservation Foundation, and The Friends of Monomoy is proud to present the lecture series Constructing Wilderness: Exploring the History and Meaning of Wilderness in American Culture. Speaker: Kent Ryden, Professor of American and New England Studies, University of Southern Maine.
Atwood House Museum, 347 Stage Harbor Road
Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)

phone: (508) 945-2493
web: www.chathamhistoricalsociety.org/
email: jspringerah@gmail.com
cost: Free to the public. Donations are welcome.
Monday, April 28, 2014 6:00 pm7:00 pm
Made in the Happy Valley - Lewis Hine's Made in the Mills  
For the past eight years, Joe Manning has been identifying some of the more than 5,000 child laborers that were photographed in the early 1900s by Lewis Hine, and then tracking down and interviewing their descendants. Manning will show many of these historic photographs, tell the stories of the children, and talk about the exciting process of searching for descendants, most of whom were not aware of the historic pictures.
Wistariahurst Museum Carriage House, 238 Cabot Street
Holyoke, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
Wednesday, April 30, 2014 7:00 pm
The New Black  
Harvard Law Professor Kenneth Mack will speak from his latest book, entitled "The New Black: What Has Changed — and What Has Not — With Race in America," which reexamines the familiar framework of the Civil Rights movement and challenges our understandings of the politics of race, racial identity and race-based inequality in a new century. Ranging from the challenges of contemporary civil rights organizing strategies, to immigration, to racial profiling, to the election of Barack Obama to the presidency, he will attempt to sketch for us the new boundaries of the debate over race in America.
Newton Senior Center, 345 Walnut Street
Newton, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)

phone: (617) 796-1450
web: www.historicnewton.org
cost: Free
Thursday, May 1, 2014 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Created Equal: The Loving Story  
Screening of "The Loving Story" and discussion of modern day constitutional debates about same-sex marriage with scholar/activists Dr. Patricia Gozemba and Karen Kahn, authors of Courting Equality.
Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American
Salem Five Community Room (210 Essex Street) Salem State University
Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)

phone: (978) 542-7349
web: www.salemstate.edu/news/26770.php
cost: free
Saturday, May 3, 2014 11:00 amTuesday, May 13, 2014 5:00 pm
Conversations on Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle  
We will view excerpts from "The Abolitionists" and "Freedom Riders" and watch Academy Award-winning "12 Years a Slave," followed by "Nothing but a Man," the landmark 1963 film that portrays the struggles and hardships of black life in the South at the beginnings of the civil rights movement. A light lunch will be served during intermission and there will be a discussion of the films led Dr. Joseph Moser, Associate Professor of English and Film Studies at Fitchburg State University. Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Community Room, Leominster Public Library, 30 West Street
Leominster, Worcester County, MA (Central)

phone: (978) 534-7522
web: www.leominsterlibrary.org
email: ebergman@leominster-ma.gov
cost: Free but please register online or call library
Sunday, May 4, 2014 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Into the Wandering Wood: New England Colonists’ Early Experiences with Wilderness  
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Wilderness Act and Monomoy, the only area in Southern New England designated under the Act, the Atwood House Museum in Chatham in partnership with Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, The Eldredge Public Library, The Chatham Conservation Foundation, and The Friends of Monomoy is proud to present the lecture series Constructing Wilderness: Exploring the History and Meaning of Wilderness in American Culture. Speaker: Katherine Grandjean is Assistant Professor of History at Wellesley College.
Atwood House Museum, 347 Stage Harbor Road
Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)

phone: (508) 945-2493
web: www.chathamhistoricalsociety.org/
email: jspringerah@gmail.com
cost: Free to the public. Donations are welcome.
Saturday, May 10, 2014 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail  
Series participants are invited on a walking tour of Boston’s Black Heritage Trail offered in conjunction with the Created Equal Film & Discussion Series. The tour is presented by our partner organization, Boston African American National Historic Site.
register for starting location
Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
Monday, May 12, 2014 6:00 pm7:00 pm
Made in the Happy Valley - Publishing Nautilus I & II with Tzivia Gover  
Early suffragist Elizabeth Towne's legacy as a publisher are the journal, "The Nautilus," and numerous other New Thought books from her home and business at 247 Cabot Street in Holyoke. Historical artifacts from Towne's career will be displayed, and Gover will tell of how the young mothers who are her students helped carry Towne's legacy forward, and who now publish their own journal in Mrs. Towne's House, "Nautilus II".
Wistariahurst Museum Carriage House, 238 Cabot Street
Holyoke, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
Monday, May 19, 2014 6:00 pm7:00 pm
Made in the Happy Valley - The Corn Broom Industry in Hatfield & Hadley  
Learn about the rise and fall of the broom-making industry in the Pioneer Valley at this lecture with speaker George Ashley.
Wistariahurst Museum Carriage House, 238 Cabot Street
Holyoke, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
Sunday, May 25, 2014 2:00 pm4:00 pm
Managing the 21st Century Wilderness  
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Wilderness Act and Monomoy, the only area in Southern New England designated under the Act, the Atwood House Museum in Chatham in partnership with Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, The Eldredge Public Library, The Chatham Conservation Foundation, and The Friends of Monomoy is proud to present the lecture series Constructing Wilderness: Exploring the History and Meaning of Wilderness in American Culture. Speakers: Dave Brownlie, Refuge Manager, Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, and Nancy Roeper, National Wilderness Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Atwood House Museum, 347 Stage Harbor Road
Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)

phone: (508) 945-2493
web: www.chathamhistoricalsociety.org
email: jspringerah@gmail.com
cost: Free to the public. Donations are welcome.
Monday, June 2, 2014 9:00 AM4:00 PM
2014 Massachusetts History Conference  
This tenth annual Massachusetts History Conference is titled "Never Done: Interpreting the History of Women at Work in Massachusetts" and noted Harvard scholar Laurel Thatcher Ulrich will give the keynote. The stories of lesser-known women change-makers get lost in the larger narrative of industry, politics and conflict, but the timing is right for an examination of their tales of great and compelling variety, of lives lived with courage and determination. The conference is widely celebrated as the best networking and skill-sharing opportunity for historians of our state culture. Join us.
Hogan Campus Center, College of Holy Cross
Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)

web: masshumanities.org/history_conference_2014
email: localhistory@masshumanities.org
cost: Per person: $90 standard fee, $60 student fee, $80 for 3 from same organization, $70 for 4 from same organization.
funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, June 7, 2014 9:00 AM6:00 PM
"Building a Handsome Church: St. Michael's, Marblehead, 1714" A Symposium Observing the 300th Anniversary of St. Michael's Church, Marblehead, Massachusetts  
The establishment and building of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Marblehead, Massachusetts, will be the topic of a one day Tercentenary Symposium at the Peabody Essex Museum. Founded in 1714, the oldest Episcopal congregation in New England holding worship services in its original building is celebrating its 300th anniversary in 2014. The symposium is open to the general public. The registration fee includes a box lunch and afternoon tours of St. Michael’s Church including access to its crypt, belfry and archives. Seating at the symposium is limited and early registration is encouraged.
Morse Auditorium, Peabody Essex Museum, 161 Essex Street
Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)

web: www.stmichaels2014.org
cost: $75 includes Symposium, lunch, admission to Peabody Essex Museum and tours of St. Michael's Church
Sunday, June 8, 2014 2:00 pm4:00 pm
The Natural World and its Uses, 1660 – 2010  
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Wilderness Act and Monomoy, the only area in Southern New England designated under the Act, the Atwood House Museum in Chatham in partnership with Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mass Audubon Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, The Eldredge Public Library, The Chatham Conservation Foundation, and The Friends of Monomoy is proud to present the lecture series Constructing Wilderness: Exploring the History and Meaning of Wilderness in American Culture. Speaker: John T. Cumbler, Professor of History, University of Louisville.
Atwood House Museum, 347 Stage Harbor Road
Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)

phone: (508) 945-2493
web: www.chathamhistoricalsociety.org/
email: jspringerah@gmail.com
cost: Free to the public. Donations are welcome.
Friday, June 20, 2014 9:00 PM10:00 PM
"Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America" Broadcast on PBS  
This film chronicles the career and lasting influence of America’s premiere landscape architect, Frederick Olmsted, who designed New York’s Central Park, Boston’s Emerald Necklace, and many town commons and campuses in the Pioneer Valley. Mass Humanities funded research and development of this film through a project grant.
PBS

web: pbs.org
cost: free
Saturday, June 21, 2014 11:00 AM
High Notes of Jazz Roxbury  
Once known as Boston's "jazz mecca," Lower Roxbury was home to some of the most famous clubs and after-hours venues on the East Coast. Additionally, this neighborhood was home to hundreds of Pullman Porters and was also the stomping grounds for many people who would later become prominent Civil Rights activists. Join us as we walk from Ruggles Station, and along Tremont St and Mass Ave, exploring the unique and complex narratives of this historic community. Many of the narratives included in this walk draw from the body of oral testimonies told by former musicians, residents, club owners, and others. Your guide, Stacy Sutherland, will weave personal anecdotes, neighborhood memories, and researched analysis into a fascinating tapestry that highlights a forgotten period of Boston and American history. Funded in part by Mass Humanities. Tour meets rain or shine.
Ruggles Station, Tremont Street staircase
Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 427-1006
web: discoverroxbury.secure.force.com/ticket/#sections_a0Fd000000THOGVEA5
email: info@discoverroxbury.org
cost: $15 Adults, $5 Children 12 and Under
Tuesday, July 1, 2014 12:00 PM
Reading "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"  
Join Worcester in a communal reading of the fiery July 5, 1852, speech in which Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
City Hall Plaza
Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)

web: masshumanities.org/douglass_events
email: rsackey-milligan@masshumanities.org
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, July 2, 2014 12:00 PM
Reading "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"  
A communal reading of the fiery July 5, 1852, speech in which Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
Boston Common - at the State House/Shaw-MA 54th Memorial
Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)

web: masshumanities.org/douglass_events
email: rsackey-milligan@masshumanities.org
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, July 3, 2014 12:00 PM
Reading "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"  
Join Springfield in a communal reading of the fiery July 5, 1852, speech in which Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
Court Square Park and Old First Church
Springfield, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)

web: masshumanities.org/douglass_events
email: rsackey-milligan@masshumanities.org
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, July 3, 2014 6:00 PM9:00 PM
Fourth Annual Reading of Frederick Douglass' Speech  
A community reading of the famous Frederick Douglass speech "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" at High Rock Tower, home of the Hutchinson Family Singers (who famously toured with Mr. Douglass in 1845) will begin at 6 pm.
High Rock Tower Park, top of Circuit Avenue off High Rock Street (see web link)
Lynn, Essex County, MA (Northeast)

web: goo.gl/maps/TQBze
email: rsackey-milligan@masshumanities.org
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Friday, February 21, 2014 10:00 amFriday, May 23, 2014 4:00 pm
Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial  
Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, Tell It with Pride celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens's Shaw Memorial. When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them
Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street
Boston, Middlesex County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 536-1608
web: www.masshist.org
cost: free
Friday, February 21, 2014 10:00 amSunday, June 22, 2014 5:00 pm
MILL WORKS: “Flowers in the Factory” and “Inventing Lowell”  
The American Textile History Museum presents two very special exhibitions taking you on an unexpected journey into 19th-century New England. "Flowers in the Factory" An innovative, large-scale, fabric art installation bringing historic photographs from the ATHM collection to life through ethereal, translucent silk-screened fabric panels by artist Deborah Baronas. "Inventing Lowell" A preview of the absorbing video series on the rise of Lowell, produced by ATHM and Lowell Telecommunications Corporation for the 2015 “Places of Invention” exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.
American Textile History Museum, 491 Dutton Street
Lowell, Middlesex County, MA (Northeast)

phone: (978) 441-0400
web: www.athm.org
email: info@athm.org
cost: $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, children 6-16 and college students.
Saturday, March 1, 2014 12:00 pmMonday, April 28, 2014 4:00 pm
Work and Culture  
Artist Deborah Baronas finds that the combination of art and history is especially potent as it can inspire and educate a broad audience. Her hand stenciled scrims on view in the Gallery depict 19th century textile workers in different moments of service. These panels provide viewers with a unique idea of domestic servitude. Works on view through April 2014.
Wistariahurst Museum, 238 Cabot Street
Holyoke, Hamdpen County, MA (CT Valley)

phone: (413) 322-5660
web: wistariahurst.org/
email: fredettem@holyoke.org
cost: Admission to the gallery is $3
Saturday, March 22, 2014 Friday, August 22, 2014
City of Neighborhoods: The Changing Face of Boston  
During the last decade, Boston as a whole has become younger, and more racially and ethnically diverse. However, the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell their own unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition tells the story of a "new" Boston by looking at the overall city and at individual neighborhoods. The 45 photos, objects, and maps, many of which are based on recent census data, show us where newer immigrant groups have settled and how the streets and features of a neighborhood reflect who lives and works there. Exhibition translations will be available in the following languages: Haitian Creole, Spanish, Chinese
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street
Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)

phone: (617) 859-2387
web: www.maps.bpl.org
cost: free
funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 5, 2014 Saturday, October 25, 2014
The Things They Left Us: A Glimpse Into Civil War Life for Hatfield Men and Boys  
Civil War lesson, fun snack, living history, small town charm -- all in one visit at the Hatfield Historical Museum. You can sample hardtack and johnny cake, ask questions of the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry members encamped out front, and see our fascinating collection of Civil War artifacts. Don't miss the blood-stained soldier's Bible, the 32-star 1858 flag made into a Civil War flag with the addition of 2 stars sewn in, and the Civil War diary of one of Hatfield's most noted authors -- Daniel White Wells. The museum is open Saturday mornings 9:30-12:30.
Hatfield Historical Museum, 39 Main St., 2nd floor of library
Hatfield, Hampshire County, MA (CT Valley)

phone: (413) 247-0308
web: hatfieldhistory.weebly.com
email: kagow@comcast.net
cost: Free
Saturday, April 5, 2014 10:00 AMFriday, October 31, 2014 4:00 PM
Buckman Tavern Self-Guided Audio Tour  
Visit the Buckman Tavern, the gathering place for the Lexington militia before they encountered British soldiers in the first battle of the American Revolution, and enjoy a new self-guided audio tour.
Buckman Tavern, 1 Bedford Street
Lexington, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)

phone: (781) 862-1703
web: www.lexingtonhistory.org/events.html
email: office@lexingtonhistory.org
cost: $7 Adult / $5 Child or visit all 3 historic houses for $12 Adult / $8 Child
funded by Mass Humanities

Back to the top!

contact news signup donate