Events

Monday, February 19, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Hidden Colors is a documentary series about the real and untold history of people of color around the globe. This film series discusses some of the reasons the contributions of African and aboriginal people have been left out of the pages of history. Traveling around the country, the film features scholars, historians, and social commentators who uncovered such amazing facts about things such as: The original image of Christ; The true story about the Moors; The original people of Asia; The great west African empires; The presence of Africans in America before Columbus; The real reason slavery was ended And much more. Watch part one and then participate in discussion.
Monday, February 19, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Hidden Colors is a documentary series about the real and untold history of people of color around the globe. This film series discusses some of the reasons the contributions of African and aboriginal people have been left out of the pages of history. Traveling around the country, the film features scholars, historians, and social commentators who uncovered such amazing facts about things such as: The original image of Christ; The true story about the Moors; The original people of Asia; The great west African empires; The presence of Africans in America before Columbus; The real reason slavery was ended And much more. Part 2 and discussion at the Lynn Museum.
Monday, February 19, 2018 1:00 PM3:00 PM
Follow the words and history of four generations of Adamses, from their experiences at the Old State House, through Beacon Hill, and into Back Bay. John, Abigail, and their descendants were prolific writers. The trove of documents they left behind intimately describe their lives, public service, and Boston from the eve of the Revolution to the turn of the twentieth century.
Tuesday, February 20, 2018 7:30 PM
Join us for a panel discussion delving deeper into the playwright's stance on apartheid. Panelist include: Kyna Hamill (moderator), Assistant Director of the Core Curriculum and a Senior Lecturer in the School of Theatre, Boston University; Zoliswa O. Mali, Coordinator of South African Languages, Boston University; Diana Wylie, Professor of African Studies, Boston University; Timothy P. Longman, Director of the African Studies Center, Boston University
Tuesday, February 20, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Join Lynn Museum and Lynn Arts for storyteller, treats and activities on this Family Day at the Museum during School vacation week!
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
By 1938, nearly 150,000 German Jews had fled Nazi rule. Many sought refuge in the United States and elsewhere, but were turned away due to anti-Semitic immigration quotas and policies. In response to growing pressure, President Franklin D. Roosevelt convened the Evian Conference in Evian-les-Bains, France to discuss the fate of Europe's fleeing Jews. Delegates from thirty-two countries met, but only one nation agreed to welcome these refugees: the Dominican Republic. Join Hugh Baver, Chairman of Sosúa75, to learn more about the conference--its context, content, and participants--and how the settlement on the North Coast of the Dominican Republic, Sosúa, came to be.
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 10:30 AM1:00 PM
Come read Frederick Douglass narrative together. All ages welcome.
Friday, February 23, 2018 3:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Assistant Professor of History at Williams College ALEXANDER BEVILACQUA for a discussion of his new book, "The Republic of Arabic Letters: Islam and the European Enlightenment." In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a pioneering community of Christian scholars laid the groundwork for the modern Western understanding of Islamic civilization. These men produced the first accurate translation of the Qur'an into a European language, mapped the branches of the Islamic arts and sciences, and wrote Muslim history using Arabic sources. The Republic of Arabic Letters reconstructs this process, revealing the influence of Catholic and Protestant intellectuals on the secular Enlightenment understanding of Islam and its written traditions.
Friday, February 23, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Who was the first African American golf champion to tour on the Professional Golf Association (PGA) circuit?, Who was the first African American to serve as the United States Secretary of State?, Who was the first African American to have his likeness portrayed on a U.S. postage stamp?, Which author became the first ...come show your knowledge, learn and have fun remembering what you already knew!
Saturday, February 24, 2018 1:00 PM3:00 PM
The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in The Commonwealth of Massachusetts invites you to a public lecture on "OVERCOMING UNCIVIL DIALOGUE: New Lessons from the Puritans." The program will feature Dr. Robert Allison, Professor in the Department of History at Suffolk, and Dr. Dale Kuehne, chair of the Department of Ethics, Economics, and the Common Good at St. Anselm's College. A reception will follow where Boston weekday Puritan 1635 dresses from each of 3 socioeconomic classes hand-sewn by dame Ruby-Grace Miller will be displayed and contrasted with a Virginia gown of the same period.
  • Suffolk University, Sargent Hall, 120 Tremont Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-742-3190
  • email: Dames@nscdama.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, February 24, 2018 12:00 PM4:00 PM
The first "We Need to Talk" Day is a platform for you to tell your story, explain the services of your group or organization, to ask questions, and to start discussions. It is also a place for art, music, poetry and comedy -- everything under the topic of celebrating immigration! Enjoy free Purerto Rican food while it lasts. Free transportation to and from event (send text of "WNTT" to 413-841-0836). Supported by Berkshire Community College and Mass Humanities.
Sunday, February 25, 2018 3:00 PM4:30 PM
Join Historic Somerville for a moderated discussion with celebrated history teacher Kevin Dua. Dua is the 2017 Massachusetts History Teacher of the Year, an award sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Dua was also named a top ten finalist for the National History Teacher of the Year prize. Recognized for his work at Somerville High School, Dua will address the roles of patriotism, freedom, individuality, and collectivism in the United States, both historically and in the present. The event will be moderated by historian and legal scholar Dan Breen (Brandeis University), a longtime Somerville resident.
Sunday, February 25, 2018 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Storyteller Libby Franck will portray Edna Dean Proctor as an abolitionist and journalist who published Aunt Sally Williams' story just 5 years after Uncle Tom's Cabin was released. Born in New Hampshire and buried in Framingham, Edna Dean Proctor spent many years in Brooklyn, NY at the home of Henry Bowen, publisher of The Independent. When Aunt Sally showed up at the offices of the paper in January 1857, Edna was asked to record her story. How Sally's son bought her freedom through a network of literate slaves, and her delivery to Brooklyn is a tale as compelling today as it was in antebellum days. Songs of the period will be sung by Adrienne Williams.
Monday, February 26, 2018 6:30PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store, Boston Review and the Cambridge Public Library welcome acclaimed educators BRANDON M. TERRY, TOMMIE SHELBY, ELIZABETH HINTON, and CORNEL WEST for a panel discussion on the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. This discussion will feature Fifty Years Since MLK, the latest Boston Review issue, edited by Brandon M. Terry; and To Shape a New World: Essays on the Political Philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr. from Harvard University Press, edited by Tommie Shelby and Brandon M. Terry.
Monday, February 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
The call and desire for unity among Black leaders has historically been a challenge. The point of this summit is not to list all of the issues and problems that have prevented Black leaders from attaining unity on how we should work to improve the quality of life of Black people in America. We touch on the goals, objectives, national agenda, strategies, organizations, mobilizations, mobilizations, litigation, court rulings, legislation and mass movements for change all focused on advancing the interests of Black people toward freedom, justice, equality and empowerment.
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Six Gentlemen, one goal: the destruction of Hitler's war machine. Operating under a total veil of secrecy to carry out guerrilla attacks against top Nazi officials and chosen by Churchill himself, the Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare was a well hidden detail of the Second World War for decades. Join Giles Milton, author of "Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks who Plotted Hitler's Defeat," to learn more about the incredible men and women in this inner circle who helped defeat the Nazi regime. Books sales and signing to follow.
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Americans have a love/hate relationship with technology when it comes to elections. As with so many aspects of modern life, the act of voting now depends on computer technologies to do everything--from tracking voter registrations to verifying the accuracy of ballot counts. Yet news cycles are full of stories accusing these same systems of undermining elections with hanging chads, paperless computerized voting machines, and the threat of hacking. Charles Stewart III, founding director of the MIT Election Data and Science Lab, will explore why America--alone among the world's democracies--relies so heavily on voting technologies and how this dependence has been largely beneficial. But are there compelling new reasons for skepticism in light of the 2016 presidential election?
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 7:00PM9:00 PM
At a time of national reckoning and accountability around sexual harassment, what challenges and opportunities do women of minority communities experience in speaking out against men both inside and outside their identity groups? What does the #MeToo movement represent for women of color? What are the causes of misogyny in the broader American culture and what are the legal, political, and social shifts required to address the prevalence of sexual harassment in society? Join us in February to hear Professor Shaheen Pasha and others speak on this critical issue.
  • Friends Meeting House, 43 Center St, Rm 202
  • Northampton, Hampshire County, MA (CT Valley)
  • email: Leif.maynard@gmail.com
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 7:30 PM
Join us for a panel discussion on reflections of those who served during the height of the AIDS epidemic with moderator Rebecca Haag, former CEO of the AIDS Action Committee of MA.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store, and WBUR welcome acclaimed linguist, cognitive scientist, and award-winning author STEVEN PINKER for a discussion of his latest book, "Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress." He will be joined in conversation by Radio Open Source's CHRISTOPHER LYDON. The follow-up to Pinker's groundbreaking The Better Angels of Our Nature presents the big picture of human progress: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.
Saturday, March 3, 2018 5:30 PM
An exploration of the period of South Asian history referenced in Rajiv Joseph's play "Guards at the Taj." The plot revolves around the construction of the Taj Majal and raises questions about how grand building projects affect the ordinary lives of people who are caught in the great game of power and politics. During this symposia, actors will perform scenes from "Guards at the Taj" and audience members will be guided to explore the following questions: What drives the building of a monumental masterpiece like the Taj Majal? To whose benefit? At what cost? These questions --? as well as related questions raised in the play about beauty, love, and the power to design one's life --? will all be posed in relationship to the history of India and in the context of today's cultural/political climate.
Monday, March 5, 2018 7:00PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Harvard University Lecturer and New America Senior Fellow YASCHA MOUNK for a discussion of his latest book, "The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It." "The People vs. Democracy" is the first book to go beyond a mere description of the rise of populism. In plain language, it describes both how we got here and where we need to go. For those unwilling to give up on either individual rights or the popular will, Mounk shows, there is little time to waste: this may be our last chance to save democracy.
Tuesday, March 6, 2018 11:00 AM
A film and discussion featuring the Oscar Nominated film "Hidden Figures," a 2016 American biographical drama film directed by Theodore Melfi and written by Melfi and Allison Schroeder, based on the non-fiction book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly about Black female mathematicians who worked at the NASA during the Space Race.
  • Springfield Technical Community College, 1 Armory Square, Building 2/Scibelli Hall, Theater, 1st floor
  • Springfield, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 755-4461
  • email: vmlightfoot@stcc.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, March 6, 2018 2:00 PM
A film and discussion featuring the Oscar Nominated film "Hidden Figures," a 2016 American biographical drama film directed by Theodore Melfi and written by Melfi and Allison Schroeder, based on the non-fiction book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly about Black female mathematicians who worked at the NASA during the Space Race.
  • Springfield Technical Community College, 1 Armory Square, Building 2/Scibelli Hall, Theater, 1st floor
  • Springfield, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 755-4461
  • email: vmlightfoot@stcc.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, March 8, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 AM
Bringing decades of clinical practice with transgender and gender-diverse children and youth, Dr. Elijah C Nealy will explore the joys and challenges experienced by families of trans youth. Dr. Nealy, a social work professor at the University of Saint Joseph in Connecticut, is an out trans man, father, and author of "Transgender Children and Youth: Cultivating Pride and Joy with Families in Transition". This program is ideal for families, trans youth and adults, students, educators, and professionals interested in gender issues and family counseling.
Thursday, March 8, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us for a presentation and discussion of FHC member Elizabeth Fideler's latest book titled "Margaret Pearmain Welch (1893-1984): Proper Bostonian, Activist, Pacifist, Reformer, Preservationist." Margaret Welch grew up on Beacon Hill and as a child spent summers in the Pearmain House on Wayside Inn Road in Framingham. She resided in Louisburg Square for 60 years and was a quintessential grande dame and relentless activist. Her causes included women's suffrage, reproductive rights, world peace, and environmental protection. She and her second husband, E. Sohier Welch, also owned the Thomas Nixon House across from what is now Stearns Farm where they retreated when they needed a dose of country air. She left a tremendous legacy locally when she donated Stearns Farm and a larger 87.1 acre Welch Reservation to the Sudbury Valley Trustees.
Friday, March 9, 2018 7:00PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Harvard Law School professor Cass R. Sunstein, one of the most cited legal scholars in the U.S. and the world, for a discussion of his latest book, "Can It Happen Here? Authoritarianism in America." With the election of Donald J. Trump, many people on both the left and right feared that America's 240-year-old grand experiment in democracy was coming to an end, and that Sinclair Lewis' satirical novel, "It Can't Happen Here," written during the dark days of the 1930s, could finally be coming true. Sunstein's thought-provoking collection of essays explores the lessons of history, how democracies crumble, how propaganda works, and the role of the media, courts, elections, and "fake news" in the modern political landscape--and what the future of the United States may hold.
Saturday, March 10, 2018 5:30 PM
This symposia explores the dynamics between the discipline of history on the one hand (involving research and complex interpretations designed to arrive at truth) and the discipline of theater on the other (involving the retelling of history at the service of discerning meaning from the past). Actors from State Ensemble Theater Unit will perform scenes from "Shah Jahan" and "Guards at the Taj." Following the scene performances, audience members will engage in discussion asking the following questions: What is the nature of the truths we seek from the stage? How does the history of the Mogul Emperor Shah Jahan differ from the work of the late 19th century Bengali playwright D.L. Ray in "Shah Jahan," and the contemporary Indian--?American playwright Rajiv Joseph in "Guards at the Taj?"
Saturday, March 10, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For March, we are reading "The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914," by Christopher Clark (2012).
Sunday, March 11, 2018 1:00 PM2:15 PM
Discover decidedly unstuffy history in Andover. After selling out its popular Andover 101 program nearly a dozen times, and at the request of Andover 101 participants, Andover Historical Society is launching Andover 102. Whether you're a newcomer to Andover, or you've lived here for years, Andover 102 will introduce you to some of Andover's special places from boxing camps to Gilded Era mansions through ten short and lively stories illustrated by historic maps, photographs, and cultural artifacts.
Monday, March 19, 2018 7:00PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome DEBORAH SANTANA, JENNIFER DE LEON, LISA A. JONES, FABIANA MONTEIRO, and DEBORAH L. PLUMMER for a discussion of "All the Women in My Family Sing: Women Write the World: Essays on Equality, Justice, and Freedom." The book is an anthology documenting the experiences of women of color at the dawn of the twenty-first century. These brief, trenchant essays capture the aspirations and wisdom of women of color as they exercise autonomy, creativity, and dignity and build bridges to heal the brokenness in today's turbulent world.
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Images of the black subject--artistic, documentary, and anthropological--are forever fixed in the popular imagination through photography. Coupling the aspirations of their subjects with their own, some American photographers of the 19th and 20th centuries evoked an emotional message that went beyond self-representation and toward the re-characterization of African American experience. William Bullard and other photographers--both black and white--responded to social issues of their time, creating images that commented on politics, culture, family, and history. Deborah Willis, University Professor and Chair of Photography and Imaging at New York University, will mediate between the objectification and (re)presentation of the black body in the work of Bullard and other photographers who transformed the course of art history.
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 4:00 PM5:00 PM
A moderated discussion with The Mount's 2018 Writers-in-Residence: Elif Batuman, Buzzy Jackson and Kate Reed Petty, moderated by 2017 Writer-in-Residence Christene Barberich. Elif Batuman is a staff writer for The New Yorker and author of "The Idiot." Buzzy Jackson is the award-winning nonfiction author of "Shaking the Family Tree." Kate Reed Petty is the author of the forthcoming children's graphic novel "Chasma Knights." Christene Barberich was a 2017 Writer-in-Residence at The Mount and is the global editor-in-chief & co-founder of Refinery29.
Friday, March 23, 2018 3:00PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store, Harvard Kennedy School's digitalHKS, and the MIT Center for Civic Media welcome VIRGINIA EUBANKS, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany SUNY, for a discussion of her latest book, "Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor." Since the dawn of the digital age, decision-making in finance, employment, politics, health, and human services has undergone a revolutionary change. Today, automated systems--rather than humans--control which neighborhoods get policed, which families attain needed resources, and who is investigated for fraud. In the book, Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms, and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America.
Tuesday, March 27, 2018 8:00PM
The Gulag was a monstrous network of labor camps that held and killed millions of prisoners from the 1930s to the 1950s. More than half a century after the end of Stalinist terror, the geography of the Gulag has been barely sketched and the number of its victims remains unknown. Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome National Book Award-winning journalist MASHA GESSEN and acclaimed photographer MISHA FRIEDMAN for a discussion of their new book, "Never Remember: Searching for Stalin's Gulags in Putin's Russia."
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
In survival and in grief, with resilience and creativity, residents of Puerto Rico and other islands continue to live through the extreme, forced reversion from the digital world to analog life. After catastrophic failures of basic infrastructure, wrenching decisions and practical strategies have introduced radical approaches to the far-reaching consequences of colonialism, the implications of climate change, and the effects of continuing political neglect. Join us as panelists from across the Clark community share stories of unimaginable transformations in Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and other places forever altered by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Professor Maria Acosta Cruz (Language, Literature and Culture) will lead this interactive forum.
Thursday, March 29, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Some of the great stories of American freedom explore how disenfranchised groups have asserted their rights to be citizens. We will host a discussion that will explore how groups through American history have used agitation to help change the dialog about their position as citizens and how this history can help inform our views and reactions to the changing political climate we see today. We will explore questions of race, politics, sexuality, immigration and throughout all of it, citizenship.
  • Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 646-0515
  • web: www.masshist.org
  • email: gkleespies@masshist.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, April 2, 2018 1:35 PM
A film and discussion featuring the Emmy Nominated film "Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks," a film directed by George C. Wolfe and starring Oprah Winfrey and Rose Byrne. It is based on the book of the same name by Rebecca Skloot and documents the story of Henrietta Lacks, who was diagnosed with cervical cancer in the 1950s, and whose cancer cells (later known as HeLa) would change the course of cancer treatment.
  • Springfield Technical Community College, 1 Armory Square, Building 2/Scibelli Hall, Theater, 1st floor
  • Springfield, Hampden County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 755-4461
  • email: vmlightfoot@stcc.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 4:30 PM6:00 PM
The selfie is everywhere, but in some ways, it is nothing new. Self-portraiture--for critical examination, personal expression, public display, and demonstration of craft--has a long history, but in its current digital form does it expand or shrink one's perception of self? What is the purpose of a selfie, and is there still an art to making one? In this talk, Clark University professor John Garton (Visual and Performing Arts) will examine how the tradition pioneered in the Renaissance and other early modern epochs is being renovated today. Esteban Cardemil (Psychology) will offer commentary.
Monday, April 9, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
While the digital turn has vastly enriched many lives, it has also amplified divides, accelerated inequalities, elevated the possibility of historical amnesia, and brought us new and onerous forms of labor. But it is not irreversible. Digital emergence is feeding a renaissance of physical media, a revival of the handmade, and an analog culture that consciously looks forward rather than to the past. The opposition of digital progress and analog nostalgia is giving way to a new vision of hybridity, suggests Rick Prelinger, founder of Prelinger Archives. Centered on the archival record and the production of culture as models for social imagination, Prelinger will explore how strategies that look beyond physical/virtual binaries can redistribute power and heal digital wounds.
Thursday, April 12, 2018 6:00 PM9:30 PM
Join Dr. Robert Meagher for a free pre-show discussion about the book and and how the Vietnam War changed so much for veterans and civilians. A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds since it burst onto the literary scene, "The Things They Carried" is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling. It follows the men of Alpha Company and the character Tim O'Brien, who has survived his tour in Vietnam to become a father and writer at age 43. With original cello music as underscoring, the audience lays witness to the complex issues of war and the universal struggle of the soldier. The solo performance from presents a blurred line between truth and reality, fact and fiction for an unforgettable and thought-provoking journey.
Thursday, April 12, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Using a historical and political lens, Dr. Katherine Rye Jewell will discuss pinnacle moments of the LGBTQ civil rights movement that helped secure basic rights while highlighting the work still needed to achieve true equality for the LGBTQ community. Katherine Rye Jewell is Assistant Professor of History, and the author of "Dollars for Dixie: Business and the Transformation of Southern Conservatism in the Twentieth Century." A specialist in American political history, she is currently writing a book on the history of college radio that examines regulation and the politics of the culture wars. This program is part of the series, "Journey to Equality: The LGBTQ Civil Rights Movement."
Sunday, April 15, 2018 2:00 PM3:00 PM
A FREE drumming workshop that offers participants a physical and emotional outlet as well as space for stress reduction, self-expression and community building. The workshop is for veterans or anyone who has experienced trauma.
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 10:00 AMFriday, April 20, 2018 4:00 PM
Spend a day of school vacation MAKING HISTORY at OCHM! Come do a scavenger hunt, a craft, and tour the museum. We are located in a historic school building and promise to make learning fun! Admission for kids age 12 and under always free!
Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers with audience participation in a moderated discussion. Participants will be able to carefully handle and closely view 4 to 6 objects from the Society's collections.
  • Tapley Memorial Hall, 13 Page Street
  • Danvers, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 777-1666
  • web: www.danvershistory.org
  • email: DHS@DANVERSHISTORY.ORG
  • cost: donations gratefully accepted for educational programming
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Join us for an evening of queer poetry. Four featured poets will read original and seminal LGBTQ poetry. Those attending are welcome to read their original or favorite queer poem. Featured poets include Hannah Larrabee, Rage Hezekiah, Jade Sylan and Hannah Baker-Siroty. This program is part of the series, "Journey to Equality: The LGBTQ Civil Rights Movement."
Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Thomas Dalton, who previously worked at the newspapers "The Lynn Item" and "The Salem Evening News" has written "Frederick Douglass, The Lynn Years: 1841-1848." He is especially happy to be able to dispel some myths and inconsistencies that have been reported by newsmen like himself!
Saturday, April 28, 2018 1:00 PM3:00 PM
Poets, artists, musicians, and storytellers- Join us for a friendly, inclusive afternoon of sharing of the human spirit through the arts. There will be three featured presenters as well as a limited number of 7-minute performance slots. Come to present or simply enjoy the work of area artists and their creative energy. If you would like to register for a performance slot, please email or call.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:00 PM
Students of Oakmont Regional High School will present the 1954 Broadway version of Peter Pan (complete with flying effects), designed in conjunction with local members of the Native American Community to present Native American Characters in a culturally accurate way . Stay after the show to enjoy a post-matinee discussion with the school's history teacher, the play producers, students and the audience.
  • Alumni Auditorium, Oakmont Regional High School, 9 Oakmont Drive
  • Ashburnham, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (978) 827-5907
  • email: jaubuchon@awrsd.org/oak
  • cost: Children (under 12): $8, Students (middle, high school, and college) and seniors: $10, Adults: $14
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 28, 2018 7:00 PM
Students of Oakmont Regional High School will present the 1954 Broadway version of Peter Pan (complete with flying effects), designed in conjunction with local members of the Native American Community to present Native American Characters in a culturally accurate way .
  • Alumni Auditorium, Oakmont Regional High School, 9 Oakmont Drive
  • , County, MA ()
  • contact: (978) 827-5907
  • email: jaubuchon@awrsd.org/oak
  • cost: Children (under 12): $8, Students (middle, high school, and college) and seniors: $10, Adults: $14
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 12, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For May, we are reading "A Man Called Ove," by Fredrik Backman (2012).
Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:00 PM2:00 PM
With the expertise of Professor Elisabeth Stoddard of WPI, students have designed and executed a Participatory Photography exhibit to share what they have learned about the Arboretum with the larger community on a culminating walking tour. This exhibit will help the community to grapple with the question, "What do we know about our land through texts and photographs?" Professor Stoddard's WPI students shared exemplars of their own outdoor learning stations to advise our own students in the construction of three outdoor learning stations.
  • Auburn Public Schools, 10 Swanson Road
  • Auburn, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (508) 832-7744
  • email: sconnell@auburn.k12.ma.us
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, June 1, 2018 7:00 PM
"Almost Sunrise" is a story of veteran resilience and recovery. The film follows two Iraq veterans, Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson, who struggle with depression upon returning home from service. Fearful of succumbing to the epidemic of veteran suicide, they seek a lifeline and embark on a 2,700-mile walk across America as a way to confront their inner pain. The film captures an intimate portrait of two friends suffering from the unseen wounds of war as they discover an unlikely treatment: the restorative power of silence and meditation. Join us for a post-show panel discussion with Dr. Bob Meagher featuring Tom Voss, the documentary subject, and Michael Collins, the film's director.
Saturday, June 9, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For June we are reading "A Piece of the World," by Christina Baker Kline (2017).
Saturday, June 16, 2018 10:00 AM4:00 PM
Bring Dad for our monthly free, one-hour guided tour of Historic Downtown Taunton. This one-mile walking tour highlights some of the important architectural, cultural, and commercial sites between Church Green and Taunton Green. A great way to learn about the city, from its earliest days through the present, these tours are the third Saturday of every month, May through October. We always start on the front steps of the OCHM. 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm Enjoy lunch with Dad at the Museum! Serving hot dogs, snacks, and drinks immediately following the Walking Tour.
Saturday, June 23, 2018 1:00 PM5:00 PM
Juneteenth is a State holiday commemorating African American Freedom and Achievement. The Lynn Juneteenth Festival will be an afternoon of musical performances, presentations, art, speeches, poetry and fun for all ages. This will be a true community celebration of Freedom! All are Welcome!
Friday, September 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Come to one of the best preserved and renowned GAR halls to hear Robert Foster's lecture on the Confederate Flag: 'Symbol of Hate, not Heritage'. The author of the book 'Blue is just a Word' is vice president of Lynn Massachusetts' General Lander Civil War Roundtable, a lifetime member of The Lincoln Forum of Gettysburg, The Lincoln Group of Boston and past session musician for a major record label in London, England.
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Come join the Citizens of Massachusetts to protest the Fugitive Slave Law. Taken from the Lynn and Boston newspapers of the time, we will re-enact reactions 'from the record' of our past citizens. Speakers include local politicians, social justice activists, educators and writers.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers with audience participation in a moderated discussion. Participants will be able to carefully handle and closely view 4 to 6 objects from the Society's collections.
Friday, September 28, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
On September 28 1841, Frederick Douglass was forcibly ejected from Eastern Railroad train for refusal to ride in the "Jim Crow" car. Having purchased a first-class ticket he sat beside his friend James Buffum (a future Mayor of Lynn) on their way to an Abolitionist event. The conductor engaged some roughs to get Douglass out of his seat, but that did not happen until Douglass was thrown to the sidewalk, taking that train bench with him! Come watch our re-enactment of this early progenitor of the non-violent protest movement!
Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Come spend a beautiful Autumn morning for this special tour of abolitionist graves and storytelling by Scholar Julia Greene.

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, October 14, 2017 Sunday, February 25, 2018
Itinerant photographer William Bullard left behind a trove of over 5,400 glass negatives at the time of his death in 1918. Among these negatives are over 230 portraits of African Americans and Native Americans mostly from the Beaver Brook community in Worcester,MA. This exhibit features eighty of these unprinted and heretofore unpublished photographs. that otherwise may have been lost to history. Bullard's identification of over 80% of his sitters makes this collection especially rare and enables this exhibition to tell specific stories about individuals and recreate a more accurate historical context. Moreover, Bullard's portraits examine the role of photography as the vehicle for "a new Black identity" during the nascent years of the New Negro movement. Offering a photographic narrative of migration and resettlement in the aftermath of Emancipation and Reconstruction, Bullard's portraits address larger themes involving race in American history, many of which remain relevant today, notably, the story of people of color claiming their rightful place in society as well as the fundamentally American story of migration, immigration, and the creation of a community in new surroundings.
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 7:00 PMMonday, February 26, 2018 9:00 PM
View multiple galleries of historic Ebony magazine covers. See history as it was covered!
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.

Back to the top!