Events

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Sunday, April 30, 2017
Who am I? Where am I? These are the fundamental questions proposed by the humanities. Inquiries related to local history, literature, and education, inspire us to think deeply about the places where we live and how our identity fits into the context of our community and the seasons. Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts is a bimonthly publication produced by Hilltown Families that sheds light on embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts. With these downloadable seasonal itineraries, self-directed teens, lifelong learners, and families are encouraged to engage together in cultural opportunities that support similar interests, resulting in a shared history, strengthening sense of place.
Sunday, April 30, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Garden historian Kathryn Aalto will discuss how the magical forests of south east England inspired A.A. Milne to create the cherished tales of Winnie-the-Pooh and the Hundred Acre Wood. Aalto takes readers through an exploration of the real landscapes, shares iconic moments from the books, and celebrates the interplay of landscape and literature.
Sunday, April 30, 2017 9:30 AM4:30 AM
Research your ancestry long enough and you're bound to hit a brick wall -- the paper trail vanishes, the family seemingly disappears, and you're unable to go back to earlier generations. Whether you are struggling to find an immigrant's exact origins, uncover a maiden name, determine parentage, or discover where a family moved to, cluster research can help. The Research Services team at New England Historic Genealogical Society is routinely contracted to solve such genealogical mysteries. In this full-day seminar, our experts will teach you valuable organizational tips and practical strategies to circumnavigate common genealogical brick walls and enrich your understanding of an ancestor's life.
Monday, May 1, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Monday, May 1, 2017 Monday, October 30, 2017
From the golden dome of the State House to the elegant homes of Louisburg Square, the Beacon Hill tour travels picturesque streets, highlighting examples of early American architecture with particular emphasis on the work of Charles Bulfinch. Experience Beacon Hill's ornate past, from its rural beginnings to the vision of the Mount Vernon Proprietors, while walking among this historic collection of Federal and Greek Revival row houses. You will also hear the stories of Boston's prominent citizens who have called Beacon Hill their home. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Monday, May 1, 2017 7:30 PM9:00 PM
CANCELLED: Erica Armstrong Dunbar, University of Delaware professor of Black American Studies and History, will discuss and sign her new book in the only remaining freestanding slave quarters in New England, located next to the 18th-century mansion of the Massachusetts colony's largest slaveholding family. This program is part of the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area's annual "Hidden Treasures" celebration.
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 6:00 PM
Margaret Atwood is the author of more than forty books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays. Her novels include "The Blind Assassin," winner of the Booker Prize; "Alias Grace," which won the Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in Italy; and "The Robber Bride," "Cat's Eye," and "The Handmaid's Tale" -- coming soon as a TV series with MGM and Hulu. Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto with writer Graeme Gibson. Doors will ooen at 5:30. Parking will be available at the Davis parking garage, located across from Alumnae Hall.
Wednesday, May 3, 2017 7:00 PM9:00 PM
"The crisis of leadership in the white community is remarkable - and terrifying - because there is, in fact, no white community." by James Baldwin. King's Chapel Christian Unitarian Church invites the public to a three-part series titled: Racial Justice: Addressing Whiteness. The first is an Open and Honest Communal Reading and discussion of James Baldwin essay "On being White and other Lies". Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments provided.
  • King's Chapel Parish House, 64 Beacon Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-227- 2155 ext. 108
  • email: administrator@kings-chapel.org
  • cost: Free
Thursday, May 4, 2017 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Stonehill College's Professor of Sociology and former president of the Association for Humanist Sociology COREY DOLGON for a discussion of his latest book, "Kill It to Save It: An Autopsy of Capitalism's Triumph over Democracy." "Kill It to Save It" lays bare the hypocrisy of contemporary US political discourse, documenting the historical and theoretical trajectory of capitalism's triumph over democracy.
Friday, May 5, 2017 2:00 PM
Unlike the casual, chaotic way in which early Boston was laid out, the streets of Back Bay are arranged in an orderly grid. Renowned for its elegant homes, the architectural marvels of Copley Square, and its signature stately boulevard, Commonwealth Avenue, the Back Bay is one of Boston's most charming neighborhoods. On this tour you will learn how the Back Bay, once an actual body of water, was filled in and how the neighborhood was developed in the mid-1800s to become one of America's richest collections of art and architecture. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Friday, May 5, 2017 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School faculty and Boston Museum of Fine Arts educators as we explore works in the collection that relate to the experience of illness and our mortality -- through the lens of poetry and storytelling. Creative self-expression through the arts has always been indispensable to how we make sense of our bodies and our suffering, and is perhaps even more important in this moment of ascent technologies and the growing power of science. How do great works of the imagination help doctors to be better healers? How do they challenge us to find strength in ourselves as we confront disease? These questions and more will be the subjects of our own writing as we reflect on what we see. Participants will have an opportunity to explore the MFA art galleries and take part in two activities focused on close looking, teamwork, and empathy. Each group will be co-facilitated by an art educator and medical educator. Throughout, we will share examples of how these programs have resonated with other medical practitioners. A welcome reception for participants and delegates to the Hippocrates Symposium on Poetry and Medicine will follow. After the reception enjoy time on your own in the MFA galleries or grab a bite to eat in one of the MFA's restaurants.
Friday, May 5, 2017 3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Harvard religious history scholar BENJAMIN W. GOOSSEN for a discussion of his book, "Chosen Nation: Mennonites and Germany in a Global Era." During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the global Mennonite church developed an uneasy relationship with Germany. Despite the religion's origins in the Swiss and Dutch Reformation, as well as its longstanding pacifism, tens of thousands of members embraced militarist German nationalism. "Chosen Nation" is a sweeping history of this encounter and the debates it sparked among parliaments, dictatorships, and congregations across Eurasia and the Americas.
Friday, May 5, 2017 6:00 PM
Meet Joan Sullivan, one of John Turner I's indentured servants who lived and worked at The Gables. Through an interactive theatrical performance, learn about her life, tasks, daily challenges, and joys via a unique interpretation. Light refreshments will be available.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: advance tickets: $15; $10 for Gables members day of tickets: $17; $12 for Gables members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 6, 2017 Sunday, May 7, 2017
In 2017, The House of the Seven Gables is exploring its history related to work and labor. Life and Labor weekends will take place on first weekends May-September and will feature tours focused on labor in the home, live demonstrations of historic work and crafts, Living History Labs, and guest speakers.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:00 AM
By the mid-nineteenth century, Boston had earned the nickname "The Athens of America," as an important center for literature and as home to many of America's greatest writers. This literary tour highlights the homes and haunts of such prominent Victorians as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Charles Dickens, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Collectively, they made Boston the epicenter of American letters. What brick building went from being an apothecary's shop to the headquarters of literary Boston? What was the Saturday Club and where did they meet? For answers to these questions and more, join your guide for a stroll through Boston's literary history. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 7:00 PM
Allison Lange, assistant professor of history at Wentworth Institute of Technology, Ph.D. from Brandeis University, is an historian who focuses on gender, culture and politics. She completed her work on her doctorate by focusing on women's suffrage and the 19th Amendment. She discusses women's rights and women's suffrage movements to trace the development of modern political campaigns.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 8:00 AM5:00 PM
The 2017 International Symposium will include lectures, round-table discussions, and poetry readings. There will be talks, discussion panel, and poster sessions on historical and contemporary themes, illness and poetry, poetry as therapy, poetry in the education of health professionals, and poetry as an aid to health professionals. Symposium faculty includes: Neal Baer (writer and producer of Emmy award-winning US television show ER: judge); Jorie Graham (Harvard University, USA, judge); Jackie Kay (Newcastle University, UK: judge); Owen Lewis (Columbia University, New York City, USA: judge); Maya Catherine Popa (New York City, USA: judge).
Saturday, May 6, 2017 Sunday, May 7, 2017
Life and Labor Guided Tours, at 11:00, 1:00 & 2:00 both days, will explore the work and labor history at The House of the Seven Gables.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:30PM
"The Brush Shop" is a documentary film by Stan Sherer. Through interviews with former Pro Brush people, archival photographs from the collection of Historic Northampton, and commercials and advertisements from different periods, this film tells the story of a vital Northampton industrial history. The company was once the world's largest manufacturer of toothbrushes. This is the second showing of the day. There is an earlier showing at 2PM.
Sunday, May 7, 2017 2:00 PM3:30 PM
"The Brush Shop" is a documentary film by Stan Sherer. Through interviews with former Pro Brush people, archival photographs from the collection of Historic Northampton, and commercials and advertisements from different periods, this film tells the story of a vital Northampton industrial history. The company was once the world's largest manufacturer of toothbrushes. There is a second showing at 4:30 PM.
Sunday, May 7, 2017 3:00 PM
Meet Joan Sullivan, one of John Turner I's indentured servants who lived and worked at The Gables. Through an interactive theatrical performance, learn about her life, tasks, daily challenges, and joys via a unique interpretation. Light refreshments will be available.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: advance tickets: $15; $10 for Gables members day of tickets: $17; $12 for Gables members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 7:30 PM9:00 PM
Princeton University history professor Wendy Warren's book links the growth of the northern colonies to the Atlantic slave trade, demonstrating how New England's economy derived its vitality from the profusion of slave-trading ships coursing through its ports. Warren documents how Indians were systematically sold into slavery in the West Indies and reveals how colonial families like the Winthrops were motivated not only by religious freedom but also by their slave-trading investments. "New England Bound" punctures the myth of a shining "City on a Hill."
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.RoyallHouse.org
  • email: Director@RoyallHouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; $5 non-members.
Thursday, May 11, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Dr. Wendy Warren of Princeton University will be presenting about her book, "New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America." Her work explores the experience of chattel bondage in seventeenth-century New England, illuminating the deadly symbiosis between slavery and colonization in the Atlantic World. A book signing will follow the lecture in our Museum Store.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: $7; free for Gables members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 12, 2017 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome author NINA SANKOVITCH for a discussion of her latest book, "The Lowells of Massachusetts: An American Family." The Lowells of Massachusetts were a remarkable family. They were settlers in the New World in the 1600s, revolutionaries creating a new nation in the 1700s, merchants and manufacturers building prosperity in the 1800s, and scientists and artists flourishing in the 1900s. For the first time, Nina Sankovitch tells the story of this fascinating and powerful dynasty in "The Lowells of Massachusetts."
Friday, May 12, 2017 7:00 PM
As the latest installment of our ongoing tribute to the painters who worked and taught in the Hawthorne Barn when it was an art school, Polednik and Wilkin, both contributors to the recent catalogue raisonné of Hans Hofmann's paintings, will discuss and present images from Hans Hofmann: Works on Paper, an exhibit they curated for MOCA Jacksonville in Florida. In collaborating on this show, which will travel to the Portland Museum of Art in Maine this summer, Polednik, director of the Milwaukee Art Museum and former director of MOCA Jacksonville, and Wilkin, a New York-based independent curator, critic, and scholar of 20th-century modernism, have succeeded in illuminating the robust beauty of the abstract expressionist's drawings and watercolors.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
During the last 500 years, major changes have occurred in Northampton's wildlife. Wolves and passenger pigeons and mountain lions are gone, while beaver, bear and turkeys, which had disappeared for decades, are now back in abundance. What's more, many species are relatively new arrivals. Think of gypsy moths from Europe, cardinals and tufted titmice from the South, coyotes from the West. Sanders will highlight some of the major trends and changes that explain the mix of animal species that we now encounter in Northampton, from its urbanized center to its wilder spaces.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
Authors Abbott and Wickersham have both written critically acclaimed memoirs about the fathers they loved and lost too soon. In Fairyland, which won an ALA Stonewall Award, Abbott chronicles her Haight-Ashbury upbringing with an openly bisexual father who succumbed to AIDS. Wickersham's The Suicide Index, a National Book Award finalist, is a wise, moving, and often surprisingly humorous account of how she and her family endured in the aftermath of her gentle, affectionate father's shocking suicide. The two authors will discuss their memoirs, their writing lives, and their other work.
Sunday, May 14, 2017 6:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome STEPHEN KENNEDY SMITH and DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, editors of "JFK: A Vision for America," for a panel discussion on this new compendium of JFK's most important speeches. The book's editors will be joined by contributors Ambassador SAMANTHA POWER and RON SUSKIND for a discussion moderated by historian FREDRIK LOGEVALL. The event will include a book signing with the editors.
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Jeanne Kempthorne and Rick Reibstein will talk about the exposure of immigrant labor to harmful pollutants and noise in the landscaping industry. Prof. Reibstein will also address other environmental pollutants, including lead, pesticides, and mold, that affect immigrant and low-income communities.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 18, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
High School students explore local and regional history topics. The winning research paper receives a $250 award tonight. 3 Finalists will read their essays. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Explore the engineered world of Fort Point Channel. On this tour of discovery, you will experience the history and engineering marvels of this industrial waterway that has become the centerpiece of this neighborhood's revival. Fort Point Channel was the most difficult undertaking of the Central Artery/Tunnel Project - the I-90 extension. Since then, the Channel experienced great change. Cleaner water, parks, public docks, hotels, and restaurants have appeared among the historic bridges, buildings, and Gilette's 30MG/day cooling system. This tour focuses on the Channel itself from how it came to be through the activities of the Boston Wharf Company, South Station development, the Central Artery/Tunnel Project, and recent activation efforts. It will feature the workings of its three remaining historic bridges, plus the memories of the Mt. Washington, the rolling bridges at South Station, and the ambitious cofferdam.
Saturday, May 20, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 20, 2017 9:00 AM4:00 PM
Master how to use Italian resources and records on both sides of the Atlantic, learn how to apply for Italian dual citizenship, and gain the tools needed to plan your research trip to Italy. Whether you are just beginning your Italian family history discovery or have been researching for years, you won't want to miss this seminar. Attend lectures, chat with our genealogists, enter to win door prizes, view rare books from our collection, learn more about the Catholic record digitization project, and meet fellow family historians. Let's find our ancestors; let's explore our Italian family roots!
Saturday, May 20, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
It is an honor to host onstage, together, esteemed and beloved novelists Richard Russo and Anita Shreve. Between them, they have published some thirty books, most best-sellers, several turned into movies starring such actors as Paul Newman and Jessica Tandy (Nobody's Fool), Sean Penn (The Weight of Water), and Julia Ormond (Resistance). Russo, also a successful screenwriter, won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel "Empire Falls;" Shreve, who is currently touring for her latest book, "The Stars Are Fire," wrote the Oprah's Book Club selection "The Pilot's Wife." Both committed New Englanders, Russo and Shreve will talk about life, literature, and anything else they please. Twenty Summers cofounder Julia Glass will moderate.
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00 PM
A walk through Boston is a walk through time! The eclectic urban landscape is composed of layers of history whose story is revealed by the clues left behind. The city has aggressively reinvented itself over and over again to accommodate a growing population, the needs of business and industry, public and private transportation and public health and safety. It is engineered. Discover all the layers of Boston and the hows and whys of its changes: the invention of the telephone, the first American subway, the rise and fall of interstate highways, the recovery of the harbor, and perhaps even a forgotten body of water that was once Ben Franklin's favorite swimming hole. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00PM3:00PM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore the Southwest Corridor Park. The Park was the result of protests about the creation of an eight lane highway running through Boston's southwestern neighborhoods. Jamaica Plain's residents played an important role in stopping the planned I-95 and the efforts to create a park out of the razed land. This historical walking tour will follow the path of the park and discuss the changes in landscape to that section of Jamaica Plain and the communities that forced those changes to happen. Free and open to the public. Please note the tour will follow the SW Corridor Park (while it starts at the Jackson Square T stop, the tour will end near the Green St T stop). We invite you to continue the conversation at Doyle's Cafe after the tour, where light refreshments will be on offer (cash bar).
  • Jackson Square T Stop, 240 Centre Street
  • Jamaica Plain, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Sunday, May 21, 2017 12:00 PM5:00 PM
Join the Framingham History Center for a tour of many sites. From a 1749 gambrel owned by Henry Ford to a charming cape-style cottage. See website for more information. Don't miss refreshments at a stunning new office space in a former Saxonville Mill warehouse with cutting-edge design incorporating the mill's history.
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Thursday, May 25, 2017 5:00 PM6:15 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join Kate for an intimate conversation with author Ariel Levy about her new work, "The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir."
Friday, May 26, 2017 11:00 AM12:30 PM
Cambridge film studio Interlock Media, in association with Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, is proud to participate in an upcoming panel covering the remarkable life of lesser known feminist Margaret Fuller. A clip from their upcoming documentary on Fuller-the first full length documentary to tell her story-will be screened at the panel. Born in Cambridge Massachusetts in 1810, she was known-amongst many other accomplishments-as: A leading intellectual and the most famous feminist of the 19th century; Closely associated with the transcendentalist movement and their ideals; The first female correspondent for the New York Tribune. An author -- her book "Woman in the Nineteenth Century" is widely considered to be the first extensive feminist work in the United States. Tragically her life was cut short at age 40, when a ship she was traveling on sank off the coast of Fire Island in 1850, perishing while in the prime of her life-leaving many potential accomplishments on the table. Please join us as we delve into the fascinating life of this remarkable woman who was ahead of her time.
  • Westin Copley Hotel, 10 Huntington Ave
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 577-0000
  • email: jonathan.director@gmail.com
  • cost: $90 standard, or $60 for retired faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 26, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
Last year we featured Aurea Ensemble's string quartet in the third of our yearly "literary classical concerts." They played so exquisitely that we've invited them back to present their own tribute to Moby-Dick, "Melville and the Great White Whale," which will feature Beethoven, Webern, sea shanties, and other nautically evocative music along with readings from the novel and from Melville's correspondence with Nathaniel Hawthorne, to whom he dedicated his masterpiece. The mission of Aurea is to investigate and invigorate the relationship between music and the spoken word. Aurea aspires to unify the humanities and fine arts in dynamic, accessible & engaging ways through performance and educational outreach. Aurea's concerts combine poetry with classical, folk and contemporary music, to create performances that sweep from intimate chamber settings to major theatrical venues.
Saturday, May 27, 2017 4:00 PM
America's oldest neighborhood is a delightful labyrinth of narrow streets and exotic marketplaces. A gateway for immigrants from around the world, the North End is also home to the Old North Church, Copp's Hill Burying Ground, and the Paul Revere House. Isolated from the rest of downtown by the construction of the old Central Artery in the 1950s, the North End remains largely preserved from modern development. Upon entering the North End, you will be greeted by the new North End parks of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway. Walking among the Italian markets and one of Boston's largest collection of colonial buildings, you'll hear the story of a changing neighborhood from the time of Cotton Mather to present day re-gentrification. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 27, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, May 27, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
In a conversation sure to delve into the divisive politics of our age and what it means to be an American fiction writer of color today, Junot Díaz, whose work has been honored with a Pulitzer and a MacArthur, joins Jacqueline Woodson, whose books for readers of all ages have won prizes including a National Book Award and a Coretta Scott King Award. From his "Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" to her "Brown Girl Dreaming," from his activist work in the Dominican-American community to her stories for teenage readers about what it means to grow up black and gay, Diaz and Woodson are writers who know how to raise their voices when it counts.
Monday, May 29, 2017 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Everyone knows MIT as a Cambridge institution with a global reputation. But for its first 55 years, MIT called the Back Bay home. 101 years ago, MIT made the move from Back Bay to Cambridge. Join us as we trace "Boston Tech" from its founding to its relocation across the Charles River. This walking tour will feature some of the sites of the original Back Bay campus while discussing the drivers and the drama leading to the construction of its new campus.
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 10:30 AM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 6:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome New Yorker staff writer and acclaimed Harvard historian JILL LEPORE-author of National Book Award finalist "Book of Ages" and "The Secret History of Wonder Woman"-for the paperback release of her latest book, "Joe Gould's Teeth," the tale of her search for the long-lost, century-old manuscript called "The Oral History of Our Time." Joe Gould, a madman, believed he was the most brilliant historian of the twentieth century. So did some of his friends, a group of modernist writers and artists that included E. E. Cummings, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, John Dos Passos, and Ezra Pound. Gould began his life's work before the First World War, announcing that he intended to write down nearly everything anyone ever said to him. "I am trying to preserve as much detail as I can about the normal life of every day people," he explained, because "as a rule, history does not deal with such small fry."
Thursday, June 1, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Sip a Tauntini and test your general knowledge during a night of trivia inspired by Taunton. Winners will receive a special prize. OCHM After Hours is a program for artists, aspiring artists, and young professionals (21 and older) looking for an evening for low-key, hands-on fun. Developed in conjunction with the Museum's art and history collections and special exhibitions, each OCHM After Hours program will include a variety of live music, hands-on art-making, food, beer, wine, cocktails and more! Each one will be different and offer a new way for people to get involved.
Thursday, June 1, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Professor Ben Railton will discuss his four books and online public scholarship on the tension at the heart of American identity. The program starts after a museum-hosted reception from 6:30-7 PM. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Thursday, June 1, 2017 5:30 PM7:00 PM
A free history talk on the oral histories and new research shedding light on three generations of immiagrants.
Friday, June 2, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
In 2012, author and journalist David France released the documentary "How to Survive a Plague," the culmination of his decades-long coverage of the U.S. AIDS crisis. It won a New York Film Critics Circle Award and was an Oscar nominee. Last fall he published his book of the same title. In reviewing it for the New York Times, provocative political commentator Andrew Sullivan called it "the first and best history" of the courage behind the fight to end AIDS "and a reminder that if gay life and culture flourish for a thousand years, people will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'" In bringing them together, we anticipate a bracing discourse on politics, culture, history, and more.
Saturday, June 3, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, June 3, 2017
An exhibit of paintings by Double Edge Resident Designer Michal Kuriata will be held March 2nd through March 29th at Elmer's Store, located at 396 Main Street in Ashfield. Gallery hours will be held during Elmer's regular business hours. The exhibit is part of a series of events exploring the relationship between culture, community, and democracy, in conjunction with Double Edge's Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair, June 3 & 4.
Saturday, June 3, 2017 Sunday, June 4, 2017
Life and Labor Guided Tours, at 11:00, 1:00 & 2:00 both days, will explore the work and labor history at The House of the Seven Gables.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, June 4, 2017 1:00 PM9:00 PM
We are dancing, singing, flying, speaking, painting, and acting throughout the Center of Ashfield, from the community hall through the commons, on Main Street, to the Lake! And WE means anyone and everyone in Ashfield, the Hilltowns, and beyond. The Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair will use the whole town as the set, present-day Ashfield life and the town's history as the subject, and YOU, the community, as the performers and creators. A celebration of Ashfield's unique history of acceptance, freedom, and creativity, performed in the heart of the town by the people of this community.
Saturday, June 10, 2017 1:00 PM3:00PM
Are you interested in music? Poetry? Storytelling? Do you want to learn more about these things? Join us for an afternoon program featuring local artists who will be sharing their songs, poems, stories, and artwork in a casual, friendly setting. You can come and just listen, or if you would like to participate, let us know as there is a limited number of open slots to share your work. Schedule: Ethel Fraga, poet Alan O'Hare, storyteller and more!
Saturday, June 10, 2017 12:00 PM2:00 PM
Iconic poets Doty and Olds are among the truth-tellers we count on for words of wisdom and beauty in dark times. Their many collections have won them dozens of prizes, and they are regarded by peers as modern masters of their craft. "Sharon Olds's poems are pure fire in the hands, risky, on the verge of falling, and in the end leaping up," wrote Michael Ondaatje. "I love the roughness and humor and brag and tenderness and completion in her work as she carries the reader through rooms of passion and loss." Former U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine praised Doty as "a maker of big, risky, fearless poems in which ordinary human experience becomes music." Provincetown poet Kelle Groom will moderate.
Sunday, June 11, 2017 12:00 PM6:00 PM
The Brockton Historical Society invites visitors to spend a fun "Sunday in the Park with George - Keith" in a recreated pop-up Campello Village of 1917. Visitors will see buildings that represent a slice of life. Visitors can ask the villagers "What was the Keith Theater? Who owned the small shops? What was it like attending the Huntington School? How did you feel when you arrived as an immigrant? Did you work in a shoe factory?" One of the most famous was run by George E. Keith - the WalkOver Company. Brockton today is a city of immigrants. By connecting face to face with our past, our purpose is to create common ground to build understanding and pride in our city.
Monday, June 12, 2017 8:30 AM5:15 PM
The 13th annual Massachusetts History Conference is exploring how to ignite a passion for history among our public. Public historians are responsible for igniting a passion for history and consciousness of the past, and fostering public dialogue. This year's conference will also showcase the launch of the Mass History Alliance, a new endeavor to support and advocate for all public history organizations and their work in Massachusetts.
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour Green Street. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain's development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district's residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.
Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00 PM6:15 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join Kate for an intimate conversation with author Lee Siegel about his memoir, "The Draw."
Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Saturday, June 24, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.
Saturday, July 1, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 1, 2017 Sunday, July 2, 2017
Life and Labor Guided Tours, at 11:00, 1:00 & 2:00 both days, will explore the work and labor history at The House of the Seven Gables.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, July 3, 2017 6:00PM11:00PM
The Parks Department of Lynn, Ward Councilor Richard Colucci and coordinator Wendy Joseph are partnering with the New Lynn Coalition for our 7th annual reading of the Mass Humanities Program "Reading Frederick Douglass" at the beautiful High Rock Tower Park. All the usual favorites that make up this highly anticipated Community Event over the July 4th weekend are in place; the local musical and dance acts, local food vendors and pony rides are on board are ready for action! Per usual, we are delighted to offer this event Free to the public, Monday July 3rd, 6pm until dark at High Rock Tower Park, ending with the Fireworks display.
  • High Rock Tower Park, Circuit Ave
  • Lynn, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 617-680-1707
  • email: wendy_joseph@mac.com
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, July 5, 2017 7:00 PM9:30 PM
The Charlemont Forum is hosting a community reading of Frederick Douglass' famous speech, will take place exactly 165 years after its initial presentation. The co-artistic directors of the Double Edge Theater of Ashfield, are partnering with the Charlemont Forum to choreograph an engaging event. Actors from the Double Edge Theater together with approximately nine other readers who have volunteered from the hill towns, will give a dramatic reading of this stirring speech, which dates back to 5 July, 1852. The event will include singing of Negro spirituals and a post-reading discussion of the issues raised in the reading. After the event, refreshments will be served in the Social Hall.
  • Charlemont Federated Church, 175 Main Street
  • Charlemont, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 339-4294
  • email: sspurdy@verizon.net
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, July 6, 2017 3:00 PM4:15 PM
WAMC's Book Show comes to The Mount! Host Joe Donahue and author Courtney Maum will discuss Courtney's newest book, "Touch," a satirical and moving novel about a New York City trend forecaster who finds herself wanting to overturn her own predictions, move away from technology, and reclaim her heart.
Saturday, July 8, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. Sumner Hill includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as both abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed
Saturday, July 15, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Sunday, July 16, 2017 1:30 PM3:00 PM
This season, The Mount, in partnership with SculptureNow, is pleased to welcome back an exhibition of large-scale outdoor sculptures. Join us for a free 90-minute artist-guided tour of this world-class show, and hear the stories behind the art and artists. The tour will start at the Ticketbooth at 1:30 pm. The tour includes access to The Mount's grounds, Cafe, and Bookstore only. The tour will commence rain or shine.
Wednesday, July 19, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Come explore the narrative of racial and sexual danger that arose from the murder of Elsie Wiegel in 1909 and the widespread concerns about interracial and sexual mixing during the era. Join Mary Lui, author and Columbia University professor, in this second 2017 Community Conversation about the murder's far-reaching impacts on white working-class and middle-class women in New York City and beyond.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, July 22, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, August 2, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
This is the illustrated life history of USS Constitution in a presentation by Naval Historian Margherita Desy. For nearly 150 of her 220-year career, "Old Ironsides" has called Boston her homeport and the two have become inextricably entwined. Desy will review the building of Constitution, the service of U.S. Navy sailors and Marines in the War of 1812 when she battled the Royal Navy, the largest navy in the western world, and the tremendous skill and effort that it takes to preserve a national icon!
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: $7; free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, August 5, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society? to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 5, 2017 Sunday, August 6, 2017
Life and Labor Guided Tours, at 11:00, 1:00 & 2:00 both days, will explore the work and labor history at The House of the Seven Gables.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; Free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, August 12, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society?. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. All tours are free to the public and are offered on dates shown. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 19, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 26, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. Sumner Hill includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as both abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed
Saturday, September 2, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, September 2, 2017 Sunday, September 3, 2017
Life and Labor Guided Tours, at 11:00, 1:00 & 2:00 both days, will explore the work and labor history at The House of the Seven Gables.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: included with general admission; Free for Salem residents
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
This lecture will illustrate the diversity of domestic service in New England over the 19th and 20th centuries by focusing on three Historic New England properties. Period domestic manuals, ephemera, and other general material will also bring the lives of servants and relationships with their employers to the foreground.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: $7; free for Gables and Historic New England members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, September 9, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Thursday, September 14, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Salem State University's Avi Chomsky returns for her second Community Conversation to share the diverse stories about labor and work in the Point neighborhood of Salem. This neighborhood represents an ever-changing fabric of newly arriving immigrants to Salem.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, September 16, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour Green Street. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain's development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district's residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Sunday, September 17, 2017 1:00 PM2:30 PM
This talk and discussion will focus on Boston's Hidden Sacred Spaces.
Saturday, September 23, 2017 11:00AM
?Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society? to tour this part of the JP neighborhood which developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.??
Sunday, September 24, 2017 1:00 PM
This is a walking tour of Salem's Point Neighborhood focusing on the work in the mills and in the homes. What has made this neighborhood of enclaves for immigrant families function through the years? Join us to find out! This program is free as part of Essex National Heritage Area's Trails and Sails events. Space is limited and registration is required. The meeting location will be sent with the reservation confirmation.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: free with preregistration
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, September 30, 2017 11:00AM
Travel around the Pond with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society?. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Historical novelist William Martin’s next book, "The Mother Lode," is due out in the fall of 2017. This work continues his lifelong epic of American history with the further adventures of Boston rare-book dealer Peter Fallon and his girlfriend, Evangeline Carrington. This time, they are headed to California, where their search for a lost journal takes them into the history of the Gold Rush and gets them into plenty of trouble, too. The journal follows a group of young men who journey by sea from staid Boston to wild San Francisco, then travel up into the gold country, where they confront greed, racism, and themselves in an epic tale of adventure. Join the author for the final lecture in the Seven Lectures at Seven Gables and learn about his research and writing process. A book signing will follow the lecture.
  • The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for Gables members
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Friday, July 15, 2016 Wednesday, May 31, 2017
"Picturing Frederick Douglass," the first major exhibition of photographs of the famed abolitionist, promises to revolutionize our knowledge of race and photography in 19th-century America. Many were unpublished, forgotten for decades, and previously unseen by contemporary viewers. Several were taken in Boston. Together, the images trace Douglass's visual journey from self-emancipated man to firebrand abolitionist and elder statesman, and they narrate a photographic autobiography across a half-century of history. Douglass, who was in love with photography, sat for his portrait whenever possible, from his earliest known photograph in 1841 until his passing in 1895. As a result, he became the most photographed American of the 19th century; more photographed than President Abraham Lincoln. Picturing Frederick Douglass offers a visually stunning re-introduction to America's first black celebrity immediately recognizable in his own lifetime by millions.
  • 46 Joy St.
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: maah.org
  • cost: Admission by donation, Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
Monday, March 27, 2017 10:00 AMWednesday, June 7, 2017 6 PM
The exhibit will showcase many artifacts, documents, uniforms, equipment and photos that have been preserved either in our collection, at the fire department or from personal collections on loan to us. The exhibit will feature the stories of the line of chiefs who continue to served our city with professionalism, dedication and pride. It honors all of our firefighters who place their lives on the line at each call, and it honors those who gave their lives in the line of duty.
Friday, April 7, 2017 Saturday, September 30, 2017
This annual exhibition will examine life and labor over four centuries and the work roles of those that have worked in the buildings on our site ranging from the slaves to settlement workers. The Seven Lectures at Seven Gables series will welcome authors from around the country to speak on topics that related to work and how it has impacted American culture. The popular Community Conversation series will open up dialogue about the impact of labor on modern American immigrants. Besides these signature programs, Gables staff will be offering themed tours, family programs, and theatrical experiences in the coming year.
  • National Historic Landmark District museum campus at The House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x152
  • web: www.7Gables.org
  • email: jarrison@7Gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 1:00 PMSunday, September 3, 2017 4:00 PM
See the progression of bridal gown designs from 1870 to the present. The gowns all come from a private collection and are accompanied by headpieces. The exhibit will run until Labor Day during regular museum opening hours Wednesday-Sunday from 1-4 PM

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