Events

Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us as we talk about a new history book over dinner! January's book is a new look at our local history right here in Lexington. "Live to the Truth: The Life and Times of Cyrus Peirce" follows the story of Cyrus Peirce, who was chosen by Horace Mann to be the first director of the Lexington Normal School in 1839. An early advocate for student teaching, conversational learning, and school integration, Peirce was often at odds with the 19th century establishment, but his methods that were formulated here form the basis of much of our modern education today.
Saturday, January 26, 2019 2:30 PM
Taryn Simon's monumental installations- A Cold Hole and Assembled Audience -examine the ways in which individual intention and public performance collide in the ancient rituals of cold-water immersion and applause. On MASS MoCA's annual winter free day, join Associate Curator Alexandra Foradas for a free, public talk on the social history of applause, and on the scientific, historical, and religious context of cold-water immersion.
Saturday, January 26, 2019 1:00 PM
Taryn Simon's monumental installations- A Cold Hole and Assembled Audience -examine the ways in which individual intention and public performance collide in the ancient rituals of cold-water immersion and applause. On MASS MoCA's annual winter free day, join Associate Curator Alexandra Foradas for a free, public talk on the social history of applause, and on the scientific, historical, and religious context of cold-water immersion.
Sunday, January 27, 2019 1:00 PM2:15 PM
Discover decidedly unstuffy history at the Andover Center for History & Culture: in Andover 101, get 10,000 years of history in 75 minutes. And at 3:00 PM, discover Andover 102: 30 miles of history in 60 minutes. Come to one, come to both. Register early as programs fill quickly!
Sunday, January 27, 2019 3:00 PM
We are approaching the 250th anniversary of an act of the Massachusetts colonial legislature defining the boundaries of a new standing order parish on the "pond plain in the Jamaica end" of the Town of Roxbury. These standing order parishes were part of the organization of the colony, providing for the militia as well as taxation used for a meetinghouse and an educated teacher. Learn what the Jamaica Plain area was like at the time, who the founding families were, and how Jamaica Plain fits into the story of three separate municipalities: Roxbury, West Roxbury and Boston.
  • First Church in JP, 6 Eliot St, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Sunday, January 27, 2019 2:00 PM3:00 PM
On the home front during WWI, women and girls of Framingham gathered weekly to support our soldiers "over there." Formed in 1917, the Military Girls Club lifted the spirits of many young men with comfort boxes of sweets and necessities and regular correspondence. Founding member and Treasurer Kathryn (Cassie) Harrington Jordan compiled a beautifully detailed Military Girls scrapbook from 1916-19 with newspaper clippings detailing postcards, letters, photographs and even patriotic Dennison stickers. Cassie's granddaughter will share more with us about this invaluable snapshot of Framingham during wartime and the indomitable spirit of the women who were left behind.
Sunday, January 27, 2019 2:00 PM
Join us for a special discussion with acclaimed historian Robert Gross, author of the book Minutemen and Their World. Bob has been serving as a consulting scholar for our upcoming exhibition on April 19, 1775 in Arlington and will share some of what our research has taught us so far including that "Neither Lexington Green nor the North Bridge in Concord was the principal theater of war. That lay along the battle road passing through Menotomy." Visitors may also enjoy a display of objects and images from our collection inspired by or made from the natural world. Come learn about the connections between fashion and conservation and how mass production often emulated natural materials.
Monday, January 28, 2019 5:45 PM7:00 PM
Join the National Park Service, Boston Harbor Now and Save the Harbor/Save the Bay for a lecture exploring our Revolutionary Harbor. Best-selling author, Eric Jay Dolin will speak about his new book, "Black Flags, Blue Waters: The Epic History of America's Most Notorious Pirates." Through engrossing episodes of roguish glamour and extreme brutality, Dolin depicts the dramatic and surprising history of American piracy's Golden Age. Upending popular misconceptions and cartoonish stereotypes, Dolin provides this wholly original account of the seafaring outlaws whose raids reflect the precarious nature of American colonial life. Following the lecture, Eric Jay Dolin will be available for book signing.
Tuesday, January 29, 2019 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store, and the American Constitution Society welcome award-winning scholar and University of Chicago Law School professor JUSTIN DRIVER for a discussion of his new book, "The Schoolhouse Gate: Public Education, the Supreme Court, and the Battle for the American Mind." From racial segregation to unauthorized immigration, from antiwar protests to compulsory flag salutes, from economic inequality to teacher-led prayer--these are but a few of the cultural anxieties dividing American society that the Supreme Court has addressed in elementary and secondary schools. The Schoolhouse Gate gives a fresh, lucid, and provocative account of the historic legal battles waged over education and illuminates contemporary disputes that continue to fracture the nation.
Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:00 PM7:30 PM
The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when remembered, is often interpreted in a dismissive, comical manner. How does this case compare with other incidences of historical events that are interpreted or "curated" at the expense of accuracy and respect for human experience? How can we bring complexity back to events that have long been relegated to the realm of local folklore? Stephen Puleo, Allison Lange, Gavin Kleespies,and moderator Rev. Stephen T. Ayres will discuss the question of misunderstood history by looking at the Great Molasses Flood, the fight for women's suffrage and Leif Erickson.
Friday, February 1, 2019 6:00 PM
Join the Preservation Society of Fall River for an exhibit on the stories uncovered by research into several historic homes of Fall River.
  • Greater Fall River Art Association, 80 Belmont Street
  • Fall River, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-673-4841
  • email: fallriverpreservationsociety@yahoo.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
Unitarian Universalist Urban Ministry, Roxbury Cultural Network and Mass Humanities are pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series of works by influential women. This event will feature selections from Dorothy's Height's "Open Wide the Freedom Gates" in conjunction with Dr. Carter G. Woodson's "Mis-Education of the Negro." These moving readings--with audience participation--will be followed by a conversation about the authors' words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and there will be an opportunity to meet Mass Humanities' new Executive Director, Brian Boyles. All are welcome--please join us!
Thursday, February 28, 2019 6:00 PM7:30 PM
After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a legal battle for reparations ensued, prompting questions about the role and responsibilities of businesses within a community. Using the Molasses Flood as an historical backdrop, this panel will explore questions around labor rights and safety, the function of government regulations, and the relationship between the public and big business interests; issues that still resonate today as modern Bostonians grapple with a changing corporate landscape and city-wide gentrification. Join us for a panel discussion with Stephen Puleo, Robert Forrant, and moderator Karilyn Crockett Reception at 5:30, program begins at 6:00.
Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Nearly 60 percent of Italian immigrants living in the North End in early part of the 20th century lacked legal citizenship, diminishing their political voice when the Purity Distilling Company erected a shoddily built molasses tank in their densely populated neighborhood. The tragedy that followed is a central event in Boston's urban and immigrant history, and still elicits questions as to the rights of non-citizen residents and the responsibilities of city governments to protect vulnerable communities. The final panel in our Molasses Flood Series will explore the social and political dimensions of immigration in Boston's past, present, and future. Join us for a panel discussion with Stephen Puleo, Jim Vrabel, Marilynn Johnson, and moderator Peter Drummey.
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.
Saturday, September 29, 2018 Saturday, March 9, 2019
From 1637 until the 1920s, Arlington's Mill Brook bustled with industrial activity, ranging from grist and saw mills to large-scale manufacturing of saws, spices, wheat meal, fur clothing, wood products, and calico printing. The original source of water power from the cascading brook was gradually replaced by steam and electric power, but this fast-moving brook was a significant reason for Arlington's early growth and development. The exhibit looks as efforts over the past 100 years to protect and restore the Mill Brook corridor as an ecologically healthy linear park linking public open spaces with the parallel transportation routes of the Minuteman Bikeway, Massachusetts Avenue, and Summer Street.
Friday, February 1, 2019 Thursday, February 28, 2019
Join the Preservation Society of Fall River for an exhibit on the stories uncovered by research into several historic homes of Fall River.
  • Greater Fall River Arts Association, 80 Belmont Street
  • Fall River, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-673-4841
  • email: fallriverpreservationsociety@yahoo.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

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