Events

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
"Raíces"is a multidisciplinary performance that explores themes of roots and identity through folktales about the majestic Ceiba Tree from across Latin America and the Caribbean. Hyde Square Task Force youth artists will share their interpretation of these folktales with audiences using dance, music, and theatre. Join us after the performance for an audience discussion.
  • Hyde Square Task Force, 30 Sunnyside Street
  • Jamaica Plain, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 524-8303
  • web: www.hydesquare.org/
  • email: eva@hydesquare.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, April 25, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Little remembered today, in 1861 Moses Jacob Ezekiel became the first Jew to attend Virginia Military Institute (VMI). Ezekiel fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War and, when it ended, he moved to Italy, where the Italian king and German emperor, among others, would later award him for his sculptures. In the last decade of the 19th century, the United States began its commemoration of the Confederacy's "Lost Cause," including acknowledging the Confederate dead buried at Arlington National Cemetery. In 1911, the Daughters of the Confederacy chose Ezekiel to create the Confederate Memorial at Arlington. He also sculpted the Thomas Jefferson statue that was a focal point for the fatal Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA. Ezekiel's life and works highlight the ambiguities in the current debate over removing memorials to controversial persons or causes.
Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Join us for an evening of queer poetry. Four featured poets will read original and seminal LGBTQ poetry. Those attending are welcome to read their original or favorite queer poem. Featured poets include Hannah Larrabee, Rage Hezekiah, Jade Sylan and Hannah Baker-Siroty. This program is part of the series, "Journey to Equality: The LGBTQ Civil Rights Movement."
Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Thomas Dalton, who previously worked at the newspapers "The Lynn Item" and "The Salem Evening News" has written "Frederick Douglass, The Lynn Years: 1841-1848." He is especially happy to be able to dispel some myths and inconsistencies that have been reported by newsmen like himself!
Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Support the work of the Cambridge Historical Society at their Spring Benefit, and celebrate this year's theme, "Where Is Cambridge From?" Featuring a conversation with urban anthropologist Merry (Corky) White, second-generation restaurant owner Kari Kuelzer, Grendel's Den, Harvard Square, and more.
Thursday, April 26, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
"Raíces" is a multidisciplinary performance that explores themes of roots and identity through folktales about the majestic Ceiba Tree from across Latin America and the Caribbean. Hyde Square Task Force youth artists will share their interpretation of these folktales with audiences using dance, music, and theatre. Join us for an audience discussion after the performance.
Friday, April 27, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Andover Historical Society Board President Susan McKelliget will take us on a journey through articles, advertisements, and announcements printed in the Andover Townsman during the year 1917. Get a glimpse of what life was like in Andover in the months leading up to and after the U.S. entered World War I.
Friday, April 27, 2018 3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome ELI HIRSCH, Charles Goldman Professor of Philosophy at Brandeis University, for a discussion of his latest book, "Radical Skepticism and the Shadow of Doubt: A Philosophical Dialogue." The book brings something new to epistemology both in content and style. At the outset, we are asked to imagine a person named Vatol who grows up in a world containing numerous people who are brains-in-vats and who hallucinate their entire lives. Would Vatol have reason to doubt whether he himself is in contact with reality? If he does have reason to doubt, would he doubt, or is it impossible for a person to have such doubts? And how do we ourselves compare to Vatol? After reflection, can we plausibly claim that Vatol has reason to doubt, but we don't?
Friday, April 27, 2018 7:00 PM
Students of Oakmont Regional High School will present the 1954 Broadway version of Peter Pan (complete with flying effects), designed in conjunction with local members of the Native American Community to present Native American Characters in a culturally accurate way .
  • Alumni Auditorium, Oakmont Regional High School, 9 Oakmont Drive
  • Ashburnham, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (978) 827-5907
  • email: jaubuchon@awrsd.org/oak
  • cost: Children (under 12): $8, Students (middle, high school, and college) and seniors: $10, Adults: $14
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 28, 2018 1:00 PM3:00 PM
Poets, artists, musicians, and storytellers- Join us for a friendly, inclusive afternoon of sharing of the human spirit through the arts. There will be three featured presenters as well as a limited number of 7-minute performance slots. Come to present or simply enjoy the work of area artists and their creative energy. If you would like to register for a performance slot, please email or call.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:00 PM
Students of Oakmont Regional High School will present the 1954 Broadway version of Peter Pan (complete with flying effects), designed in conjunction with local members of the Native American Community to present Native American Characters in a culturally accurate way . Stay after the show to enjoy a post-matinee discussion with the school's history teacher, the play producers, students and the audience.
  • Alumni Auditorium, Oakmont Regional High School, 9 Oakmont Drive
  • Ashburnham, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (978) 827-5907
  • email: jaubuchon@awrsd.org/oak
  • cost: Children (under 12): $8, Students (middle, high school, and college) and seniors: $10, Adults: $14
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 28, 2018 7:00 PM
Students of Oakmont Regional High School will present the 1954 Broadway version of Peter Pan (complete with flying effects), designed in conjunction with local members of the Native American Community to present Native American Characters in a culturally accurate way .
  • Alumni Auditorium, Oakmont Regional High School, 9 Oakmont Drive
  • Ashburnham, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (978) 827-5907
  • email: jaubuchon@awrsd.org/oak
  • cost: Children (under 12): $8, Students (middle, high school, and college) and seniors: $10, Adults: $14
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:30 AM11:30 PM
Ever pondered the who, what, how of Chinatown's many public murals? Wonder no more! Join the Chinese Historical Society of New England (CHSNE) for a 60-min walking tour of murals in Chinatown, revealing the stories and history behind them. Dates: Saturday, April 28th @ 10:30 am, and Tuesday, May 1st @ 5:30 pm. The tour will begin at the China Trade Building at 2 Boylston Street, on the lower atrium level in front of CHSNE's office and the Chinatown branch of the Boston Public Library. We are part of ArtWeek--a unique annual celebration of arts, culture and creativity. Curious people of all ages will get creative at hundreds of unique events across the state--and many are FREE! Join us April 27-May 6. Get the full festival schedule at artweekma.org to the very end of the description.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 12:00 PM4:00 PM
All ages are welcome to join us for an afternoon of humanities "edutainment," with presentations, discussions, storytelling, crafts, music, food and more. After a slum dunk session with Charles Okwandu, member of the UConn men's basketball national championship team of 2011, we will continue the afternoon with conversations to share, applaud as well as inspire.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:00 PM3:00 PM
"Raíces" is a multidisciplinary performance that explores themes of roots and identity through folktales about the majestic Ceiba Tree from across Latin America and the Caribbean. Hyde Square Task Force youth artists will share their interpretation of these folktales with audiences using dance, music, and theatre. Join us after the performance for an audience discussion.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 6:00 PM7:00 PM
"Raíces" is a multidisciplinary performance that explores themes of roots and identity through folktales about the majestic Ceiba Tree from across Latin America and the Caribbean. Hyde Square Task Force youth artists will share their interpretation of these folktales with audiences using dance, music, and theatre. Join us after the performance for an audience discussion.
Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
As the 400th anniversary of the landing of the Mayflower approaches, there is a renewed interest in the first English settlers to America and in the original materials that document their story. Hear from preeminent early American genealogists and historians, Robert Charles Anderson, FASG and Dr. Francis J. Bremer about their continued contributions to early New England scholarship and their planned projects. Robert Charles Anderson will discuss his research on the genealogical and ideological connections among the Puritans who settled New England, featured in his forthcoming book, "Puritan Pedigrees: The Deep Roots of the Great Migration to New England" (due out in 2018). Dr. Bremer will discuss the importance of William Bradford's journals to our understanding of this period and he will preview his plans for a newly transcribed and annotated edition of Bradford's work, "Of Plimoth Plantation."
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 12:30 PM2:00 PM
For the 40th anniversary of federal affirmative action, Cornell University Press releases "Stanley's Girl: Poems" and re-issues "We'll Call You If We Need You: Experiences of Women Working Construction," a classic of labor history with a new preface that casts the stories of tradeswomen pioneers through today's lens. The timely poems of Stanley's Girl probe workplace-linked suicide, sexual assault, and accidents to investigate how systems of domination and exclusion are maintained. Join us for a reading, discussion, and book-signing!
  • Women's Studies Research Center, Brandeis University, Epstein Building, 515 South St.
  • Waltham, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (781) 736-8100
  • web: www.brandeis.edu/wsrc/
  • email: pcahl@brandeis.edu
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, May 2, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
Labor took many forms for Revolutionary-era Bostonians, who conducted work in many types of locations and under a variety of social arrangements. Occupations, levels of skill, and working conditions varied considerably. Men, women, and children, free and enslaved, worked in households and workshops, on wharves and slipways, in ropewalks and printing-shops. Join Professor Christopher Clark as he provides insights into the Atlantic world, the beginnings of the American Revolution, race and gender relations, and the origins of Boston's subsequent urban growth through the lens of laboring people.
Thursday, May 3, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Offering a behind-the-scenes look into the publishing world, join New York Times bestselling author Julia Pierpont alongside her editor Caitlin McKenna as they discuss Julia's latest work, The Little Book of Feminist Saints, a luminous work illustrated by artist Manjit Thapp. Together they match short biographies with stunning portraits of one hundred exceptional women throughout history.
Friday, May 4, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
A program of dramatic readings and lots of songs, with emphasis on Western Mass voices, telling the origin story of May Day as International Workers' Day in Chicago. Includes an inspiring introduction to U.S. labor history up to the present day.
Sunday, May 6, 2018 3:00 PM5:00 PM
The impact of the First World War is deeply reflected in American popular music of the era. In the first half of this program, Andover Choral Society will tell the story of the war's impact through popular song, featuring arrangements written for Andover Choral Society by Jerry Noble, a Massachusetts resident, accompanist, and arranger. The second half of the program will include contemporary settings of John McCrae's poem, "In Flanders Fields," and Siegfried Sassoon's poem "Everyone Sang," written by Sassoon shortly after the end of the war. Also on the program is Mack Wilberg's arrangement of "My Country 'Tis of Thee," which features words penned in 1832 by Samuel F. Smith, an Andover Theological Seminary student.
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 10:30 AM11:30 AM
Hear Judith Dolkart, The Mary Stripp & R. Crosby Kemper Director of the Addison Gallery of American Art, discuss "Early Morning on the Avenue in May 1917," painted by American artist Fredrick Childe Hassam, one of a series of flag paintings he created during World War I.
Thursday, May 10, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Don Robb looks at the tragic and lasting consequences of World War I. The presentation will touch on the impact of the war on its combatants, the reorganization of Eastern Europe, the results of meddling in the Middle East, the cost of overlooking Africa and Asia, and the long term effects of the Treaty of Versailles.
Saturday, May 12, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For May, we are reading "A Man Called Ove," by Fredrik Backman (2012).
Saturday, May 12, 2018 11:00AM
Join us to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw, who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT, and the First Church Burial Ground. All JPHS tours are free to the public and last between 60 and 90 minutes. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. Additional tours available 6/30 and 8/15.
Saturday, May 19, 2018 12:00 PM2:00 PM
With the expertise of Professor Elisabeth Stoddard of WPI, students have designed and executed a Participatory Photography exhibit to share what they have learned about the Arboretum with the larger community on a culminating walking tour. This exhibit will help the community to grapple with the question, "What do we know about our land through texts and photographs?" Professor Stoddard's WPI students shared exemplars of their own outdoor learning stations to advise our own students in the construction of three outdoor learning stations.
  • Auburn Public Schools, 10 Swanson Road
  • Auburn, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (508) 832-7744
  • email: sconnell@auburn.k12.ma.us
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 19, 2018 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to check out this beautiful area. Developed as a suburb by General William Hyslop Sumner in the mid-nineteenth century, this National Historic District includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The tour includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder as well as the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. Additional dates: July 7th at 11:00 am and August 25th at 11:00 am.
Sunday, May 20, 2018 12:00 PM5:00 PM
Please join the Framingham History Center on our 16th House Tour. Among others, the sites on this year's self-guided tour include a recently restored historic homestead established in 1693 by a family fleeing the Salem witch hysteria, a beautifully updated mid-century modern Campanelli ranch, and a 1920s Craftsman style home designed by renowned Boston architect Frank Kendall.
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:00 PM
Premiere public screening of the thirty-minute documenary film prior to its WGBY broadcast, followed by 45-minute panel discussion.
  • Community Arts Trust Building, Center for the Arts, 33 Hawley Street
  • Northampton, Hampshire County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 210-3384
  • web: gisforgunthefilm.com/
  • email: kateway44@gmail.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
The Vicar of the Old North Church has two occupations: spiritual leader of a North End congregation and director of one of the most famous historical sites in the nation. Have you ever thought about the occupational hazards involved in leading two distinct, but intertwined institutions? The Rev. Stephen Ayres is both the vicar of the Old North Church and the Executive Director of the Old North Foundation. Vicar Ayres has led thousands of worship services, preached over one thousand sermons, married nearly a hundred couples, baptized over a hundred babies, and presided over dozens of funerals. At the same time, he has helped transform the Old North Church from a brief stop on the Freedom Trail into a respected and professional historic site that teaches history and civic values to hundreds of thousands of visitors every year.
Saturday, May 26, 2018 10:00 AMSunday, May 27, 2018 2:30 PM
Not every local landmark has a plaque on it. Join David Dunlap, author of "Building Provincetown," for a walking tour from the Hawthorne Class Studio out to Max Bohm's Grand View cottage (we should all live in such "cottages"), past the homes and studios of more than 60 painters, sculptors, photographers, playwrights, and authors, including Robert Motherwell, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, Marsden Hartley, Joel Meyerowitz, and Eugene O'Neill.
Saturday, May 26, 2018 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970's, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. Additional dates: July 7th at 11:00 am and September 1 at 11:00 am.
Sunday, May 27, 2018 7:00 PM9:30 PM
Every season we bring together diverse literary figures to chat informally, often intimately, about their work and its place in the culture. This year we are privileged to lend our stage to Ptown's own Michael Cunningham, winner of numerous prizes including a Pulitzer, and the internationally best-selling essayist, critic, and translator Daniel Mendelsohn. Inspired by Mendelsohn's acclaimed memoir An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic and Cunningham's fictional works that have paid homage to Woolf, Whitman, and even classic fairy tales, the two authors will discuss how writers turn consciously to literature itself as a way of broadening their own horizons.
Friday, June 1, 2018 7:00 PM
"Almost Sunrise" is a story of veteran resilience and recovery. The film follows two Iraq veterans, Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson, who struggle with depression upon returning home from service. Fearful of succumbing to the epidemic of veteran suicide, they seek a lifeline and embark on a 2,700-mile walk across America as a way to confront their inner pain. The film captures an intimate portrait of two friends suffering from the unseen wounds of war as they discover an unlikely treatment: the restorative power of silence and meditation. Join us for a post-show panel discussion with Dr. Bob Meagher featuring Tom Voss, the documentary subject, and Michael Collins, the film's director.
Saturday, June 2, 2018 10 AM3 PM
On Saturday, June 2nd, anyone with a personal connection to Chinese immigration to Massachusetts is invited to bring up to three photos that represent themselves, their families and/or their community, whether very recently or generations ago. Any photos are welcome: family reunions, special occasions, snapshots, weddings, military service, etc. Old or new unframed originals preferred. Contributors may bring print, digital, and cell phone images. The photos will be scanned onsite, and the originals immediately returned to their owners. There will be an area where individuals can tell a story about their photos on camera. Professional archivists will be on hand to advise contributors on how to care for their family artifacts. This event is free and open to the public.
Saturday, June 2, 2018 7:00 PM9:30 PM
Prize-winning investigative reporter Jodi Kantor and provocative political commentator Andrew Sullivan will unite for a talk on the rapidly changing cultural landscape in the wake of Kantor's momentous New York Times story exposing Harvey Weinstein's decades of alleged abuse toward women. That story set off a worldwide reckoning that empowered victims to come forward with the truth about men who had been abusing their power in a wide range of fields for years. Sullivan, whom we are honored to welcome for a third appearance on the Barn stage, has spoken out fearlessly as well, at times challenging the most far-reaching effects of the #MeToo movement on privacy and sexuality. We anticipate a timely and riveting conversation.
Saturday, June 2, 2018 1:00 PM4:00 PM
Join us for a special celebration of Frederick Douglass's Bicentennial! As part of Mass History Day this year, high school and middle school students from across the state submitted projects related to Douglass, African American history and more; the winners of the competition will be on hand to receive cash awards and to present their projects alongside noted Douglass scholars David Blight (Yale University), Lois Brown (Wesleyan University), and John Stauffer (Harvard University). After the forum, the afternoon will close with a specially commissioned, Fredrick Douglass-themed "choral poem" researched, written, and performed by high school student poets.
Monday, June 4, 2018 8:30 AM5:15 PM
The 14th annual Massachusetts History Conference explores ways our history organizations preserve and present the history of forever more rapidly changing communities and contexts. The conference offers peer sessions, workshops, and networking opportunities to explore and learn about new ways and new communities in public history, and the roles historical organizations do and can play to become part of the social dialogue.
Tuesday, June 5, 2018 8:00 AM10:00 AM
Starting at The Mount's Historic Stable, venture through Edith Wharton's original estate guided by one of Mass Audubon's naturalists. Exploring woods, wetlands and meadows, you'll learn the skills for birding by sight and song as we look for numerous bird species. Following the two-hour walk, join us on The Terrace and compare your findings over a cup of coffee. Bird Tours are every Tuesday, June 5th - Sept 25th.
Tuesday, June 5, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
Today Paul Revere is a household name, but how many people know how multi-talented and complex Revere actually was? He personifies the transformation of the working world in America through his various occupations, which included silversmith, engraver, dentist, hardware merchant, bell and cannon founder, and sheet-copper manufacturer. Our panelists will discuss Revere as patriot, craftsman, metallurgist, and early American industrialist in order to place him in context with his colonial compatriots and to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his death.
Friday, June 8, 2018 7:009:30
Award-winning playwright J.T. Rogers and longtime foreign correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran will talk about the intersection of politics, journalism, and art. Rogers's most recent play, Oslo, won seven awards, including the 2017 Tony for Best Play, and dozens of rave reviews: "as expansive and ambitious as any in recent Broadway history" (New York Times); "a riveting political thriller" (AP). Rogers transforms modern history into drama, tackling such complex subjects as the Rwandan genocide, the CIA's early involvement in war-torn Afghanistan, and racism in America. Chandrasekaran, following a career at the Washington Post that sent him to three dozen countries and led to his authoring books on Iraq (Imperial Life in the Emerald City, a National Book Award finalist), Afghanistan (Little America), and the lives of today's war veterans, is now the executive producer of Starbucks' social impact media initiatives.
Saturday, June 9, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For June we are reading "A Piece of the World," by Christina Baker Kline (2017).
Saturday, June 9, 2018 12:00PM7:00PM
The Caribbean American Heritage Festival acknowledges the heritage and contributions of Caribbean immigrants in celebration of National Caribbean Heritage Month. The theme for the festival is Caribbean diaspora awareness, highlighting our community, showcasing our local arts.
Saturday, June 9, 2018 7:009:30 PM
Robert Pinsky, a former U.S. poet laureate, joins Monica Youn, whose third book, Blackacre, was named one of the best poetry books of 2016 by the New York Times, the New Yorker, and the Washington Post. They will share recent work and exchange ideas, along with moderator Elizabeth Bradfield, an award-winning poet in her own right, as well as a local naturalist who lives in North Truro.
Saturday, June 16, 2018 10:00 AM4:00 PM
Bring Dad for our monthly free, one-hour guided tour of Historic Downtown Taunton. This one-mile walking tour highlights some of the important architectural, cultural, and commercial sites between Church Green and Taunton Green. A great way to learn about the city, from its earliest days through the present, these tours are the third Saturday of every month, May through October. We always start on the front steps of the OCHM. 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm Enjoy lunch with Dad at the Museum! Serving hot dogs, snacks, and drinks immediately following the Walking Tour.
Saturday, June 23, 2018 1:00 PM5:00 PM
Juneteenth is a State holiday commemorating African American Freedom and Achievement. The Lynn Juneteenth Festival will be an afternoon of musical performances, presentations, art, speeches, poetry and fun for all ages. This will be a true community celebration of Freedom! All are Welcome!
Thursday, July 5, 2018 9:00 AM
"Parlez-vous francais?" Come enjoy coffee, croissants, and some French conversation on the Terrace Thursday mornings (July 5- August 30) at 9 AM in honor of Edith Wharton's love affair with France! Reservations are required and must be made at least 24 hours in advance.
Friday, July 6, 2018 5:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us on the Terrace every weekend in July and August from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. for lively evenings of free music played by the region's most talented musicians.
Thursday, July 12, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join Dr. Irene Goldman-Price as she examines evidence of Edith Wharton's prejudices gleaned from Wharton's writings, setting it within the context of her life and times, and probing its implications.
Saturday, July 21, 2018 10:00 AMSunday, July 22, 2018 5:00 PM
This free, family-friendly festival features art, crafts and other ethically made cultural works created by Indigenous artists from dozens of countries. Enjoy demonstrations by artists and a one-of-a-kind opportunity to exchange, connect, and build community. Chat with Indigenous artists about their crafts and bring home a beautiful memento of your local trip around the world. Cultural Survival is a non-profit organization based in Cambridge, MA, whose mission is to advocate for the rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Friday, July 27, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join us for an intimate conversation between Kate and Pamela Paul, author of "My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues" and editor of The New York Times Book Review.
Friday, August 31, 2018
To honor the Bicentennial Celebration, the Frederick Douglass Neighborhood Assocation has created a traveling exhibit that tells the amazing story of Frederick Douglass and connects him to the diversity of Brockton today. Original pieces by Brockton artists highlight the connection of Douglass to Haiti, Cape Verde, Ireland, women and veterans. The display will be in the Main Post Office in Brockton in March and April, and in August will travel to the Main Branch of the Brockton Public Library.
Friday, September 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Come to one of the best preserved and renowned GAR halls to hear Robert Foster's lecture on the Confederate Flag: 'Symbol of Hate, not Heritage'. The author of the book 'Blue is just a Word' is vice president of Lynn Massachusetts' General Lander Civil War Roundtable, a lifetime member of The Lincoln Forum of Gettysburg, The Lincoln Group of Boston and past session musician for a major record label in London, England.
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Come join the Citizens of Massachusetts to protest the Fugitive Slave Law. Taken from the Lynn and Boston newspapers of the time, we will re-enact reactions 'from the record' of our past citizens. Speakers include local politicians, social justice activists, educators and writers.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers with audience participation in a moderated discussion. Participants will be able to carefully handle and closely view 4 to 6 objects from the Society's collections.
Friday, September 28, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
On September 28 1841, Frederick Douglass was forcibly ejected from Eastern Railroad train for refusal to ride in the "Jim Crow" car. Having purchased a first-class ticket he sat beside his friend James Buffum (a future Mayor of Lynn) on their way to an Abolitionist event. The conductor engaged some roughs to get Douglass out of his seat, but that did not happen until Douglass was thrown to the sidewalk, taking that train bench with him! Come watch our re-enactment of this early progenitor of the non-violent protest movement!
Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Come spend a beautiful Autumn morning for this special tour of abolitionist graves and storytelling by Scholar Julia Greene.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:30 PM9:00 PM
Known widely as a simple and courageous mother figure, in fact Harriet Tubman was an intelligent, crafty, fearless visionary who transcended assumptions about black women's abilities, leading scores of enslaved people to freedom. Author of the first adult biography of Tubman, historian Kate Clifford Larson will share new Tubman scholarship and describe recent public history initiatives related to her life and role in the Underground Railroad. Copies of Bound for the Promised Land will be available for purchase and signing.
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.royallhouse.org
  • email: director@royallhouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; general admission $10.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Colonel Earl "The Pearl" Wederbrook, USMC (Ret) on a short trip through time to compare and contrast the occupation of Boston in 1776 with Berlin in 1945 and Baghdad in 2004. Col. Wederbrook will discuss and analyze the military, political, economic, social and moral aspects and consequences of using the military to quell civil unrest, occupy conquered territory or aid in nation building. Afterwards, join us for a reception and conversation with Col. Wederbrook, a representative of the Office of Veterans Services, and several veterans from post-9/11 deployments for an intimate discussion on what it's like being the occupier in a foreign land and how to adapt to civilian life upon return home.
Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In the shadow of the Holocaust, what is the world's continuing responsibility to prevent genocide and mass atrocity crimes and hold accountable those who commit them? In recent decades genocide and mass atrocities have been committed in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, Darfur, Libya and Syria, among other places. The world stood by and did nothing in several of these situations, but intervened in others under the UN doctrine of responsibility to protect. Today, nationalism and authoritarianism are on the rise, the US has withdrawn from human rights leadership, and support for implementing the responsibility to protect has diminished in the UN. John Shattuck is a former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor who participated in the successful international effort to end the genocidal war in Bosnia, and helped establish the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.
Saturday, April 7, 2018 10:00 AMSaturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM
Tapping into History features Greenfield Tap & Die, Lunt Silversmiths, and D. B. Kellogg's Grocery Store, uncovers the connections between them, and examines the lives of employers and employees in the early 20th century. Every Friday 10 AM to 2 PM, April 13 to October 29, first and second Saturdays of each month April through October, 10 AM to 2 PM. By appointment year round!
Friday, April 13, 2018 Monday, April 30, 2018
Why do many of us know so little about WWI? Perhaps because America entered the war during its last year? Or is it because few understood shell shock and how to process the horrors of the trenches? While WWII is known for the "greatest generation," WWI produced the "lost generation." But WWI is not lost to Framingham. As the centenary of Armistice approaches in November, this exhibit features seven local men and women whose stories speak to the larger forces at play in the first war that engulfed the world. Innovations around flight and technology, the impact of the influenza pandemic, pacifism and suffrage are just some of the threads tying Framingham to WWI.

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