Events

Saturday, April 30, 2016 9:00 AMSunday, May 1, 2016 4:00 PM
Spend some time at OSV learning a historical craft. Formerly known as Crafts at Close Range, these adult workshops vary from blacksmithing to textiles, coopering, foodways, and more. Come and try your hand at a craft and take home your finished masterpiece! Unless otherwise specified, workshops will be held in the Museum Education building. Our April 30 and May 1 classes include Intro to Basketmaking, Intro to Pottery, Bread Making, Basic Blacksmithing, Forge Welding, and more. Cost varies depending on class. Pre-registration required. Visit our website for more information and to register.
Sunday, May 1, 2016 3:30 PM4:30 PM
Part of New Repertory Theatre's ongoing Spotlight Symposium series, in which theatre artists, area academics, and experts explore and discuss ideas related to the play and how they impact our world. In this discussion, experts put the play's imagined dialogue between Sigmund Freud and C.S. Lewis in context by exploring and debating the many ways in which science and religion both contradict and complement each other. Moderated by Kyna Hamill, Ph.D., with panelists: Ian Hutchinson, Ph.D., Sir Chrisopher Ricks, Diane O'Donoghue, Ph.D.
Monday, May 2, 2016 7:30 PM
At once an intimate drama and a decades-spanning epic that leaps from the recent past to the present to the speculative near-future, this film from "Sixth Generation" filmmaker Zhangke is an intensely moving study of how China's economic boom and the culture of materialism it has spawned has affected the bonds of family, tradition, and love. Official selection at the Cannes Film Festival. Directed by Jia Zhangke, China, France, Japan| 2015 | 99 min. | Chinese and English with English subtitles.
  • Studio Cinema, 376 Trapelo Road
  • Belmont, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (617) 484-3980
  • web: www.belmontworldfilm.org
  • email: egitelman@belmontworldfilm.org
  • cost: General Admission : $11 in advance online, $12 cash or check only at the door; Students & Seniors: $9 in advance online, $10 cash or check only at the door; Passports: $70 online, $75 cash or check at the door (provides admission to 8 films and can be shared with one other person)
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, May 2, 2016 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome magazine editor MARGARET GUROFF for a discussion of her book "The Mechanical Horse: How the Bicycle Reshaped American Life. About The Mechanical Horse." With cities across the country adding miles of bike lanes and building bike-share stations, bicycling is enjoying a new surge of popularity in America. It seems that every generation or two, Americans rediscover the freedom of movement, convenience, and relative affordability of the bicycle.
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 5:30 PM7:00 PM
The Nichols family (who resided in what is now the museum from 1885-1960) was an upper middle class, Progressive-era (1890-1920) family with three intelligent, driven, and very different daughters who were involved in many reform activities of the day, including: women's suffrage, pacifism, and civil service reform. On May 4, the museum will open an exhibition that delves into the social and political activities of this innovative family, focusing especially on the advocacy of the younger generation of the three Nichols sisters, Rose, Marian and Margaret. We hope that by telling the stories of the past alongside the stories of the present, audiences will be inspired to engage in critical thinking about the role of women in public policy and politics. Join us to celebrate the opening! Light refreshments will be served.
  • Nichols House Museum, 55 Mount Vernon Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 227-6993
  • web: www.nicholshousemuseum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 6, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
After being accidentally rammed by the Coast Guard destroyer USS Paulding on December 17, 1927, the USS S-4 submarine sank to the ocean floor off Cape Cod with all forty crew aboard. Only six sailors in the forward torpedo room survived the initial accident, trapped in the compartment with the oxygen running out. Author and naval historian Joseph A. Williams has delved into never-revealed archival sources to tell the compelling narrative of the S-4 disaster, the first attempt to rescue survivors stranded aboard a modern submarine.
Saturday, May 7, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 7, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Monday, May 9, 2016 7:30 PM
Iremar works the vaquejadas, a traditional sport similar to rodeo from the rural northeast of Brazil and Brazil's second highest grossing sport after soccer. He and his co-workers live in the truck used to transport the animals, forming a makeshift, but close-knit family. But the country and region are changing and the area's booming clothing industry has Iremar dreaming of becoming a fashion designer. A wild and sexy ride of a film! Winner at both the Venice Film Festival and Toronto International Film Festival. Part of our spotlight on Brazil, host of the 2016 Summer Olympics. Contains several graphic sex scenes. Directed by Jia Zhangke, Brazil, Uruguay, The Netherlands | 2015 | 101 min. | Portuguese with English subtitles.
  • Studio Cinema,376 Trapelo Road
  • Belmont, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (617) 484-3980
  • web: www.belmontworldfilm.org
  • email: egitelman@belmontworldfilm.org
  • cost: General Admission : $11 in advance online, $12 cash or check only at the door; Students & Seniors: $9 in advance online, $10 cash or check only at the door; Passports: $70 online, $75 cash or check at the door (provides admission to 8 films and can be shared with one other person)
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, May 9, 2016 6:30 PM8:00 PM
Join us for a four-part discussion on competing notions for a common good. Led by Jill Silos-Rooney PhD, we will discuss to what extent we are responsible for each other. What do we owe each other as members of the same nation? To what extent do we take responsibility for what happens in the country at large? The World? Participants may attend one, several, or all sessions. Copies of each title will be available at the circulation desk. Please ask for the Common Good Reads program books.
  • M.G. Parker Memorial Library, Large Print Room, 28 Arlington Street
  • Dracut, Middlesex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 454-5474
  • web: www.dracutlibrary.org/
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Join us for a sneak peak at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center (opening to the public on June 25th). Several members of the fishing community will display family photographs, documents, and artifacts and share stories about how the industry and community have changed over time. This event is part of "Salted, Pickled, or Smoked: Preserving & Presenting the Cultural Heritage of the New Bedford/Fairhaven Fishing Community", a year-long effort to digitize the cultural heritage of New Bedford’s fishing community.
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 7:00 PM9:00 PM
In today's climate of division and Islamophobia, it is easy to imagine that we are going through a uniquely troubling moment in our history that is out of sync with our national ethos of religious tolerance. In his book, "American Heretics", Dr. Peter Gottschalk provides a historical perspective on the treatment of various religious groups and describes how many groups from Quakers to Judaism, once regarded as anti-thetical to American values, are embraced as evidence of our strong religious heritages giving hope to today's Muslims, Sikhs, and other religious groups now under fire. Dr. Peter Gottschalk and Muslim activist, Tahira Wadud will examine religious intolerance and ways to combat it in the current climate.
Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 12, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Dan-el Padilla, author of "Undocumented: A Dominican Boy's Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League", will give an overview of his own life to address the question, Will There Ever Be a Clear Path to Citizenship? Despite his exceptional accomplishments as a scholar at Princeton, Oxford, Stanford and at Columbia Universities, he has still not been able to obtain full legal resident status in the United States. Refreshments will be served.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • email: anuncio@7gables.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
This presentation by renown professor Teresa Fava Thomas explores Migration from Italy to Central MA between 1880 and 1920 and what happened to those people. You will learn about their work on the Wachusett Reservoir project and in the quarries and factories.See flyer for more information. Event is open to the public. Registration is required: please call or e-mail the museum.
Friday, May 13, 2016 7:00 PMMonday, May 16, 2016 8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 13, 2016 6:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome senior adviser to Hillary Clinton SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL for a discussion of his latest book, "A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln, 1809–1849." The first of a multi-volume history of Lincoln as a political genius—from his obscure beginnings to his presidency, assassination, and the overthrow of his post-Civil War dreams of Reconstruction. This first volume traces Lincoln from his painful youth, describing himself as “a slave,” to his emergence as the man we recognize as Abraham Lincoln.
Saturday, May 14, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 14, 2016 10:00 AM2:00 PM
15th Mass Vol. Infantry reenactors present a living history of the American Civil War including stories of Fitchburg’s soldiers’ valor and courage. Learn about Fitchburg’s contributions to the war. Presented by the Fitchburg Historical Society, the Fitchburg Public Library and the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Reenactment Group. Presented as part of the Freedom’s Way Hidden Treasures program. Visit http://www.discoverhiddentreasures.org/ for more information.
Saturday, May 14, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The district includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Sunday, May 15, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, May 15, 2016 7:00 PM9:30 PM
CASA GRANDE is an exploration of issues of race and class privilege among Rio de Janeiro's decadent elite. The timely film depicts a teenage boy's struggle to escape his overprotective parents as they covertly spiral into bankruptcy. Directed by Fellipe Barbosa | 2014 | 115 min. | Brazil | Portuguese and French with English subtitles.
  • Studio Cinema, 376 Trapelo Road
  • Belmont, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (617) 484-3980
  • web: www.belmontworldfilm.org
  • email: egitelman@belmontworldfilm.org
  • cost: $12 general admission, $10 for students and seniors. The Belmont World Film Passport includes eight admissions for $75 and can be shared with one other person.
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, May 15, 2016 12:00 PM5:00 PM
This house tour provides an opportunity for visitors to experience some remarkable homes -- four centuries of Framingham homes 1696-1980. Visit a relatively untouched first period home built in 1696, a 1790 (federal style) restoration, an 1812 boardinghouse, an exquisite timber framed home built in 1980 and more! Wallace Nutting, most famous for colorized New England landscape photographs, rehabilitated one particular home in the early 1900s.
Sunday, May 15, 2016 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome National Book Award winner and renowned historian NATHANIEL PHILBRICK for a discussion of his latest book, "Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution"—a surprising account of the middle years of the American Revolution, and the tragic relationship between George Washington and Benedict Arnold.
Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Whiskey has profoundly influenced America’s political, economic, and cultural destiny, just as those same factors have inspired the evolution and unique flavor of the whiskey itself. Unraveling the many myths and misconceptions surrounding America’s most iconic spirit, Bourbon Empire traces a history that spans frontier rebellion, Gilded Age corruption, and the magic of Madison Avenue. Taking readers behind the curtain of an enchanting—and sometimes exasperating—industry, the work of writer Reid Mitenbuler crackles with attitude and commentary about taste, choice, and history. Few products better embody the United States, or American business, than bourbon.
Friday, May 20, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 20, 2016 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome author of Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life JOSHUA RUBENSTEIN for a discussion of his latest book, "The Last Days of Stalin. About The Last Days of Stalin." Joshua Rubenstein’s riveting account takes us back to the second half of 1952 when no one could foresee an end to Joseph Stalin’s murderous regime.
Saturday, May 21, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 21, 2016 11:00 AM3:30 PM
Fishing community members are invited to bring photographs, documents and/or artifacts reflecting their fishing heritage. These items will be scanned and/or photographed to create a digital record. Preservation specialists will provide advice about preserving your past and industry experts will help identify people and places in photographs. An oral historian will record community stories. Those who participate by sharing their photographs, documents, or artifacts will be given a USB drive containing the scanned images of their materials. Digital files will be archived at UMASS Boston, UMASS Dartmouth, the New Bedford Public Library and the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center. This event is part of "Salted, Pickled, or Smoked: Preserving & Presenting the Cultural Heritage of the New Bedford/Fairhaven Fishing Community", a year-long effort to digitize the cultural heritage of New Bedford’s fishing community.
Saturday, May 21, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today’s Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Sunday, May 22, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, May 23, 2016 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome writer and Yale PhD candidate MOIRA WEIGEL and the Boston Globe's Love Letters columnist MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN for a discussion of Weigel's first book, "Labor of Love: The Invention of Dating." “Does anyone date anymore?” Today, the authorities tell us that courtship is in crisis. But when Moira Weigel dives into the history of sex and romance in modern America, she discovers that authorities have always said this.
Tuesday, May 24, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Beards—they’re all the rage these days. Take a look around: from hip urbanites to rustic outdoorsmen, well-groomed metrosexuals to post-season hockey players, facial hair is everywhere. The New York Times traces this hairy trend to Big Apple hipsters circa 2005 and reports that today some New Yorkers pay thousands of dollars for facial hair transplants to disguise patchy, juvenile beards. And in 2014, blogger Nicki Daniels excoriated bearded hipsters for turning a symbol of manliness and power into a flimsy fashion statement. The beard, she said, has turned into the padded bra of masculinity. Of Beards and Men makes the case that today’s bearded renaissance is part of a centuries-long cycle in which facial hairstyles have varied in response to changing ideals of masculinity.
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Important maritime landmarks dot the coastline. The House of the Seven Gables has been one for four centuries. Even more important to maritime safety, America's lighthouses have kept countless ships from wrecking, saved untold lives, and contributed mightily to the growth and prosperity of the nation. Eric Jay Dolin, the author of Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America, will share the dramatic story of these soaring coastal sentinels, using numerous slides to illuminate the beauty and grandeur of America's lighthouses. It is a riveting tale of nasty political battles, technological innovation, natural disasters, and war. But most of all it is a story about the male and female keepers, who, often with the invaluable assistance of their families, faithfully kept the lights shining and the fog signals blaring. A book signing for Brilliant Beacons will follow the talk.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • cost: $7, Free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 26, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 26, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
2016 is the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Harvard educated Misha Teramura looks at what it was like to be a playwright in Renaissance London; some of the actors for whom Shakespeare wrote; his friends and rivals, his patrons and publishers; and other aspects of “The Bard’s” life.
Friday, May 27, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 27, 2016 5:30 PM7:30 PM
It's a family friendly celebration of two exciting exhibitions - Tiny Titans: Dinosaur Eggs and Babies and Finding Raven: Art and Stories from the Northwest Coast. Explore the galleries, enjoy refreshments, discover the interactive stations, and hear the legends and stories. Please RSVP to 413.443.7171 ext. 313.
Saturday, May 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 28, 2016 10:00 AM5:00 PM
Travel with Raven to the Northwest Coast and experience the rich heritage of the Native peoples, portrayed in dramatic storytelling and striking art objects. Fantastic tales set in the oceans, streams, and forests of the Pacific Northwest are accompanied by totem poles, carved masks, and other ceremonial and utilitarian objects reflecting the traditions and artistry of the Kwakiutl, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit groups, among others. The exhibit features objects from the collection of Joan and Paul Gluck, one of the finest private collections of Pacific Northwest coastal art.
Saturday, May 28, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Sunday, May 29, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. "Blood on the Snow" is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Beatles arrived in the United States on February 7, 1964, and immediately became a constant, compelling presence in fans’ lives. For the next six years, the band presented a nonstop deluge of sounds, words, images, and ideas, transforming the childhood and adolescence of millions of baby boomers. Beatleness explains how the band became a source of emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual nurturance in fans’ lives, creating a relationship that was historically unique. Looking at that relationship against the backdrop of the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, political assassinations, and other events of those tumultuous years, the book examines critically the often-heard assertion that the Beatles “changed everything” and shows how—through the interplay between the group, the fans, and the culture—that change came about.
Thursday, June 2, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Ada Gobetti's Partisan Diary is both diary and memoir. From a political and military point of view, the "Partisan Diary" provides firsthand knowledge of how the partisans in Piedmont fought, what obstacles they encountered, and who joined the struggle against the Nazis and the Fascists. The mountainous terrain and long winters of the Alpine regions (the site of many of their battles) and the ever-present threat of reprisals by German occupiers and their fascist partners exacerbated problems of organization among the various partisan groups. So arduous was their fight,that key military events--Italy's declaration of war on Germany, the fall of Rome, and the Allied landings on D-Day --appear in the diary as remote and almost unrelated incidents. Ada Gobetti writes of the heartbreak of mothers who lost their sons or watched them leave on dangerous missions of sabotage, relating it to worries about her own son Paolo.
Saturday, June 4, 2016 11:00AM
Walk along Green Street with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain’s development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district’s residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map with the starting point is on our website.
Saturday, June 4, 2016 6:30 PM9:30 PM
Outstanding multi-award-winning actor Brian Dennehy, recognized for his interpretation of many of Eugene O'Neill's complex characters, will be the guest of honor at their annual dinner on June 4, 2016 at Provincetown Town Hall. The gala is to support this fall's 11th festival, "Eugene O'Neill and Tennessee Williams: Beyond Success" with performances from theaters around the world throughout the charming seaside town from Sept 22-25, 2016. Following the dinner, a conversation with Dennehy will be led by renowned O'Neill scholar, Robert M. Dowling, author of "Eugene O'Neill: A Life in Four Acts". For more information, see www.twptown.org.
  • Provincetown Town Hall, 260 Commercial Street
  • Provincetown, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508)789-8366
  • email: info@twptown.org
  • cost: Varies. See http://www.twptown.org/annual-dinner-2016 for details.
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, June 10, 2016 4:00 PM5:00 PM
In September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within. Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation.
Saturday, June 11, 2016 5:307:30
The Great Barrington Historical Society and the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers invite you to join them on the terrace of a beautiful, historic mansion to enjoy cocktails and appetizers while taking in the breathtaking views of the surrounding Berkshire Hills. Tour the first and second floors, then hear a lecture by author Paula Uruburu about the Gilded Age mega-celebrity Evelyn Nesbit. Her biography of Miss Nesbit is entitled "American Eve: Evelyn Nesbit, Standford White, the Birth of the "It" Girl and the Crime of the Century."
Saturday, June 11, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to tour this neighborhood developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tour lasts between 60 and 90 minutes and canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Monday, June 13, 2016 8:30 AM4:30 PM
The 12th annual Massachusetts History Conference is leaping forward with a day filled with opportunities to meet, network, and collaborate with others in public history in the Commonwealth. "We" are local historical societies, libraries, town clerk offices, historic houses, larger historical organizations, and national historical parks, independent professionals and academic historians. In our state, local history is national history. We not only educate Americans about the Revolution and the industrial revolution, we tell the stories and safeguard ancestral records of a significant percentage of American families. We work to put history on the map in the Commonwealth. Together our efforts can be more successful in preservation, outreach, and educating our visitors and participants about the complex economic, social, political, and cultural issues that dominated our past and shape our present. The conference is widely celebrated as the best networking and skill-sharing opportunity for historians of our state culture.
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Henriette Lazaridis, author of The Clover House, will explore immigration-related themes of exile and nostalgia, belonging, and identity from the perspective of a modern Greek-American family. Reflecting on every immigrant's rite of passage in becoming part of a new country.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: anuncio@7gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, June 20, 2016 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
A family-favorite tradition returns! Fitchburg-made Iver Johnson bicycles are on display, in one of the largest displays ever, within one mile of the factory where they were created. The Iver Johnson company made some of the most highly regarded racing and pleasure bikes in America, from the 1890’s till World War II. They were shipped from Fitchburg to Iver Johnson sporting goods stores all over the world. These historic bikes have been loaned by local collectors and restoration experts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 AM to 4 PM and Wednesdays 10 AM to 6 PM.
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
When the House of the Seven Gables opened as a museum in 1910, Caroline Emmerton recognized this importance of Nathaniel Hawthorne's literary fame in attracting visitors to the site. The tradition continues with author Mark Beauregard who will discuss his new novel, The Whale: A Love Story, which explores the intense relationship between Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville and their surprising influence on each other's work. Hawthorne and Melville were neighbors while Hawthorne was writing The House of the Seven Gables and Melville was finishing Moby-Dick: their passionate friendship shaped their work and changed American literature. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, June 23, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Essex—the famous shipwreck that inspired Moby Dick—and its aftermath is a captivating story of a ship’s crew battered by whale attack, broken by four months at sea, and forced—out of necessity—to make meals of their fellow survivors. Dowling delves into the ordeal’s submerged history—the survivors’ lives, ambitions and motives, their pivotal actions during the desperate moments of the wreck itself, and their will to reconcile those actions and their consequences.
Saturday, June 25, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South Street, Jamaica Plain 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
At the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation. Responsible for orchestrating the American push into the continent was President Thomas Jefferson. He most famously recruited Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, who led the Corps of Discovery to the Pacific, but at the same time there were other teams who did the same work, in places where it was even more crucial.
Saturday, July 2, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The district includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 9, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today’s Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, July 16, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Wednesday, July 20, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
This groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book—until now. In Romantic Outlaws,Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein—two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy. In 1797, less than two weeks after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died, and a remarkable life spent pushing against the boundaries of society’s expectations for women came to an end. But another was just beginning. Wollstonecraft’s daughter Mary was to follow a similarly audacious path.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. University of Massachusetts Professor Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.
Thursday, August 11, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Ken Turino will explore the life and work of William Sumner Appleton, founder of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities now Historic New England. Using examples from New England historic sites including Caroline Emerton and The House of the Seven Gables, the presentation will illustrate Appleton's numerous contributions to the evolution of the historic preservation movement during the first half of the twentieth century. The presentation will also look at the history of the preservation movement in America as well as Appleton's legacy and influence on modern preservation efforts. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, August 13, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South St, JP 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, August 13, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South St, JP 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, August 20, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The district includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 27, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today’s Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, September 3, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, September 10, 2016 11:00AM
Walk along Green Street with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain’s development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district’s residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map with the starting point is on our website.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Alexandra Pi?eros Shields, Ph.D., Executive Director, Essex County Community Organization, will give an overview of the political and economic dynamics that have shaped U.S immigration policy and affected immigrants from Latin America. Her talk, Framing the Immigration Debate will highlight lessons for our current immigration policy challenges. Refreshments will be served.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: anuncio@7gables.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Dance, theatre, and pageantry played an important role at the House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association in the days of Caroline Emmerton. Join Anjali Mitter Duva, author of the historical novel "Faint Promise of Rain" for a journey to 16th century Rajasthan, India. Based on her travels to that desert region and on her study of kathak dance, a classical storytelling art that blends both Hindu and Muslim traditions and aesthetics, Anjali will tell the story of this classical art form as it traveled through India's tumultuous history, mirroring the region's own story as the dance was performed by Hindu temple women, then Muslim courtesans, then residents of red light districts, and finally by artists on the international stage. Anjali will include a short kathak dance demonstration, and books will be available for sale and signing. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email or call.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7; free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
In the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they didn't turn to male graduates. Rather, they recruited an elite group of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible. For the first time, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women--known as "human computers"--who broke the boundaries of both gender and science.
Saturday, October 8, 2016 3:00 PM4:00 PM
Between 1911 and 1922, a series of wars would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states, in which the central conflict, of course, is World War I—a story we think we know well. As Sean McMeekin shows us in this revelatory new history of what he calls the “wars of the Ottoman succession,” we know far less than we think. The Ottoman Endgame brings to light the entire strategic narrative that led to an unstable new order in postwar Middle East—much of which is still felt today. McMeekin also brilliantly reconceives our inherited Anglo-French understanding of the war’s outcome and the collapse of the empire that followed.
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 6:00 PMFriday, November 16, 2018 8:00 PM
In 1768, precisely one hundred years after the House of the Gables was built, craftsmen had likely completed the final decorative embellishments of a new mansion erected across the harbor in Marblehead. Exquisite carvings, mahogany paneling, and magnificent hand-painted murals gave the grand new residence an aura of splendor that would have rivaled most New England homes at that time, just as the Turners' impressive dwelling would have a century earlier. Join former Lee Mansion curator Judy Anderson for an illustrated talk about the preservation of the splendid house and its hand painted wallpapers over two and a half centuries. A book about those wall-coverings will be for sale after the talk. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members.
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Saturday, February 6, 2016 Sunday, May 1, 2016
Foodways — how people produce and sell food and how people cook and eat it — is a popular topic. Everyone eats, and tastes and trends change. This exhibition at Historic Northampton features nearly 250 years of Northampton's changing food scene.
Saturday, February 27, 2016 Sunday, February 12, 2017
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts explores through more than 20 objects how nature has inspired, impressed, and enlightened society long before the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859. Using three themes, the exhibition explores the subject of flora and how it inspired the decorative arts. “Botanizing” looks at the movement to classify, study, and teach though a selection of educational books and prints detailing floral anatomy and stages of life. “Art in Nature” delves into the museum’s rich collection of decorative arts to see how plants and flowers have influenced designers and craftspeople in fields as diverse as textiles, ceramics, furniture, and architecture. Finally, “Bringing the Outdoors In” showcases ceramic and glass vessels which literally brought colorful and fragrant flowers and plants indoors for personal enjoyment and study.
Monday, April 4, 2016 10:00 AMWednesday, May 25, 2016 6:00 PM
A new exhibition on doctors, nurses, hospitals and medicine in Fitchburg. Fitchburg’s Burbank Hospital was a center for innovations in public health; while generations of nurses trained in Fitchburg’s modern facilities. This exhibition is supported by a grant from the George R. Wallace Foundation.
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 11:00 AMSaturday, November 19, 2016 4:00 PM
The Nichols family (who resided in what is now the museum from 1885-1960) was an upper middle class, Progressive-era (1890-1920) family with three intelligent, driven, and very different daughters who were involved in many reform activities of the day, including: women's suffrage, pacifism, and civil service reform. On May 4, the museum will open an exhibition that delves into the social and political activities of this innovative family, focusing especially on the advocacy of the younger generation of the three Nichols sisters, Rose, Marian and Margaret. We hope that by telling the stories of the past alongside the stories of the present, audiences will be inspired to engage in critical thinking about the role of women in public policy and politics.
  • Nichols House Museum, 55 Mount Vernon Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 227-6993
  • web: www.nicholshousemuseum.org/
  • cost: Free with museum admission. Adults: $10, Children 12 and under: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 28, 2016 10:00 AMSunday, October 30, 2016 5:00 PM
Travel with Raven to the Northwest Coast and experience the rich heritage of the Native peoples, portrayed in dramatic storytelling and striking art objects. Fantastic tales set in the oceans, streams, and forests of the Pacific Northwest are accompanied by totem poles, carved masks, and other ceremonial and utilitarian objects reflecting the traditions and artistry of the Kwakiutl, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit groups, among others. The exhibit features objects from the collection of Joan and Paul Gluck, one of the finest private collections of Pacific Northwest coastal art.
  • Berkshire Museum, 39 South Street (Route 7)
  • Pittsfield, Berkshire County, MA (Berkshire)
  • contact: (413)443-7171
  • web: berkshiremuseum.org
  • email: info@berkshiremuseum.org
  • cost: Regular museum admission: $13 adult; $6 child (under 18), Museum members & children 3 and under free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, June 20, 2016 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
A family-favorite tradition returns! Fitchburg-made Iver Johnson bicycles are on display, in one of the largest displays ever, within one mile of the factory where they were created. The Iver Johnson company made some of the most highly regarded racing and pleasure bikes in America, from the 1890’s till World War II. They were shipped from Fitchburg to Iver Johnson sporting goods stores all over the world. These historic bikes have been loaned by local collectors and restoration experts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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