Events

Saturday, March 23, 2019 1:00 PM3:00 PM
Join us for the opening of an exhibit of photographs created by over 30 adult English-language learners at SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc. Themes reflect the students' diverse interests and points of view. Some focus promarily on connections with family and friends. Others depict traditions such as the making and sharing of food and celebration of special events. Still others depict the beauty of nature, neighborhoods throughout the city, or new ways to see details of everyday life. Their captions and autobiographical accounts reveal deeply-held hopes and dreams and reveal what it has been like to leave a homeland in order to build a new life for themselves and their children in the U.S.
  • Narrows Center for the Arts, 16 Anawan Street
  • Fall River, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-324-1926
  • email: aklimt@umassd.edu
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 23, 2019 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Back by popular demand! Join us for a night in the 18th century underworld with a bawdy singalong and a presentation of The Beggar's Opera, the first modern comedy musical from 1728. Follow the infamous highwayman Macheath as he tries to dodge his wife's greedy family and the other ladies he abandoned along the way. This jukebox musical uses popular 18th century melodies, but with sarcastic lyrics and a biting political commentary rarely seen on stage at this time. Fill ev'ry glass and sing along!
Saturday, March 23, 2019 2:00 PM3:00 PM
How did Framingham manage to avoid the catastrophic death rates from the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic? Join us as two public health experts review the measures put in place by the Framingham Health and Tuberculosis Demonstration Project (1916-1923) and how these drastically reduced the incidence of death from the flu locally. Kathy Hursen, former Framingham Public Health Nurse, and Dr. Alfred DeMaria, Jr., retired Medical Director and State Epidemiologist at the Mass. Bureau of Infectious Disease, will present Framingham's public health legacy during WWI and during a pandemic that took 50 million lives worldwide.
Tuesday, March 26, 2019 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us as we talk about a new history book over dinner: "Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy" by Karen Abbott. Everyone loves a good untold story, and this month's book offers four. Follow the stories of Belle Boyd, Emma Edmonds, Rose Greenhow, and Elizabeth Van Lew as they use their wits and feminine wiles to participate in the Civil War. From running espionage rings to running headfirst onto the battlefield, these four women defied the odds and accomplished more than anyone would have thought possible. After all, just how dangerous could a woman be?
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome celebrated short story writer AMY HEMPEL--author of Reasons to Live--for a discussion of her first story collection in over a decade, "Sing to It." A master of the short story, Hempel's new collection is her first since "Collected Stories," published more than a decade ago. These fifteen stories reveal Hempel at her most compassionate and spirited, as she introduces characters, lonely and adrift, searching for connection.
Thursday, March 28, 2019 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome lawyer, scholar, and writer CARA ROBERTSON for a discussion of her debut book, "The Trial of Lizzie Borden." The book tells the true story of one of the most sensational murder trials in American history. When Andrew and Abby Borden were brutally hacked to death in Fall River, Massachusetts, in August 1892, the arrest of the couple's younger daughter Lizzie turned the case into international news and her trial into a spectacle. Robertson explores the stories Lizzie Borden's culture wanted and expected to hear and how those stories influenced the debate inside and outside of the courtroom, offering a window onto America in the Gilded Age and showcasing its most deeply held convictions and most troubling social anxieties.
Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:00 PM
Women and men from Boston were very active in the movement to gain the vote for women. Lucy Stone, Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton and others gave speeches, wrote articles, and marched in parades during the almost seventy-year struggle. Come and listen to present day Bostonians as they read from these writings and speeches that reveal women's determination to be able to vote in order to participate fully in the political life of the country. Judith Kalaora, from History at Play, will be a part of the program. Ms. Kalaora portrays a number of famous women through living history performances, including Deborah Sampson, Christa McAuliffe, and Hedy Lamarr. We are very pleased to have her join us in the role of Lucy Stone, one of the most important figures in the woman suffrage movement.
  • Jamaica Plain Branch Library, 30 South St, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-524-2053
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • email: info@jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, March 30, 2019 2:00 PM3:30 PM
Join Rosalyn Elder and More Than Words Youth for a reading of A Ballad for Massachusetts, a poem celebrating the accomplishments of 13 African American heroes in our history, from Elizabeth "MumBett" Freeman to Mel King. Elder is the author of "Exploring the Legacy: People and Places of Significance," detailing African American history across 742 sites in 141 towns in Massachusetts. All event attendees will receive a 20% off coupon to our bookstore and hot tea courtesy of More Than Words, a nonprofit social enterprise that empowers young adults who are in the foster care system, court-involved, homeless, or out of school to take charge of their lives by taking charge of a business.
Sunday, March 31, 2019 1:00 PM2:15 PM
Discover decidedly unstuffy history at the Andover Center for History & Culture Sunday, March 31. At 1:00 PM discover Andover 101: 10,000 years of history in 75 minutes, and at 3:00 PM attend Andover 102: 30 miles of history in 60 minutes. Come to one, come to both, but register early as programs fill quickly!
Friday, April 5, 2019 1:00 PMSaturday, April 6, 2019 4:00 PM
Come celebrate spring and join us for a display of beautiful floral arrangements inspired by our historic artifacts. Members of the Framingham Garden Club picked ten pieces from our collection to interpret and their designs will be on display throughout the Edgell Memorial Library. Meet the designers and hear about their inspiration at Friday's opening reception and enjoy docent-led tours throughout the day on Saturday.
Saturday, April 6, 2019 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Become a part of local history! Bring us a photo taken in the Taunton area and let us scan it for our digital collection. We'll give you back the original and your image will become a part of our archive collection. Bring in your photographs, preferably loose rather than in an album, and unframed. Anything up through 11 x 17 inches is welcome. Please provide us any information you have about the photos: people, places, events, local landmarks, holiday displays. Visit those attics, sort those closets, and dig out those boxes of mementos to help us add to the photographic record of our local community!
Sunday, April 7, 2019 2:00 PM
William Dawes, Jr., is known today only as the other rider who carried news of the British army's march to Lexington in April 1775. Like the more famous Paul Revere, Dawes was deeply involved in the Patriot movement for years both before and after that date. This talk reveals Dawes the militia organizer, the fashion icon, even the arms smuggler whose secret mission for the Patriots' Committee of Safety helped bring on the Revolutionary War. The speaker will be J. L. Bell, author of "The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War." This event is co-sponsored by the Roxbury Historical Society, the Unitarian Universalist Urban Ministry and the JP Historical Society.
  • 10 Putnam St, Roxbury, MA 02119
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org/events
  • cost: Free
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 8:00 AM4:00 PM
Register now for the Digital Commonwealth's 13th Annual Conference, centered around the theme of "Responsibilities in the Digital Age". The world is going digital, but what do we need to consider when handling and digitizing collections? The keynote speaker is Peter Hirtle, Alumni Fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, who will speak on "Learning to Live with the Legal Risks of Digital Collections". Mass Humanities Board Member Whitney Battle-Baptiste will speak on the DuBois collection.
Wednesday, April 10, 2019 6:30 PM8:00 PM
This year we at Cambridge Historical Society ask, "How does Cambridge engage?" On April 10, City Councilors Alanna Mallon and Sumbul Siddiqui discuss how Cambridge engages in the digital realm. Chatting about local politics and their weekly podcast, "Women Are Here," the two city councilors will reflect on the ways local government has engaged with residents historically, and how using the Internet and social media can serve as tools to stay connected. Smarika Suwal, a Cambridge Rindge and Latin School alumnus and now a History and Classics double-major at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, will moderate the conversation.
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Local historian Dereka Smith of the Whately Historical Society and Cher Nicholas, president of the Hatfield Historical Society, will share their extensive research into the agrarian rebellion of 1786-87 that came to weigh so heavily on the minds of the Founders as they crafted our Constitution. You may have heard other talks on Shay's Rebellion in the past, but you won't have heard this new research on the roles of the Hatfield and Whately participants. Who were the Hatfield and Whately men who threw in with the rebels, and what were the repercussions?
Friday, April 26, 2019 Saturday, April 27, 2019
The Radical interconnectedness Festival offers the opportunity for artists to address the concerns of marginalized communities through a wide variety of experiential forms: theater, music, installation, dance, poetry and more, all presented within walking distance in alternative venues, storefronts, and Shea Theater. Stories will engage issues of race, age, gender, religion, economic class, and aspects of cultural identity that have been suppressed. Our commissions include African American experiential theater, indigenous persons photography installation, trans music, identity questioning performance, African American music, neurologically different dance, developmentally disabled theater, and formerly incarcerated women spoken word, among others. One day after the festival (April 28) will be a free panel/workshop featuring participating artists and the public in conversation.
  • Shea Theater Arts Center, 71 Avenue A
  • Turners Falls, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: 413-648-7432
  • web: bit.ly/2IGRDct
  • cost: free
Saturday, April 27, 2019 1:00 PM3:00 PM
Celebrate poetry month with OCHM. Join us for a friendly, inclusive afternoon of sharing of the human spirit through the arts. Poets of all ages are invited to present their original works and all are invited to simply listen and enjoy the work of area artists and share in their vibrant, creative energy. Pre-registration is encouraged to ensure a presentation slot, please email or call to get on the list.
Thursday, May 9, 2019 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Until the 1940's there was no reliable way for fishing vessels to communicate with those on shore. Radio telephones, single side band radios, and marine radio operators were important innovations, allowing family members to communicate with loved ones at sea, but no conversation was private. Today, cell and satellite phones and email have facilitated ship to shore communication. Fishermen's wives will share stories about how changes in communication technology have impacted their lives.
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 Sunday, December 1, 2019
The Westford Museum has two new permanent exhibits! Explore the beginnings of Westford from the time of the Native Americans through its founding. How did Westford come to be? What was the town like in 1729? What did people do? Survey the nearly 275-year history of Westford Academy. Discover notable WA graduates and of their contribution to history. See the evolution of the WA's four buildings.
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 12:00 PMSaturday, April 27, 2019 5:00 PM
A photography exhibit created by over 30 adult English-language learners at SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc. Themes reflect the students' diverse interests and points of view. Some focus promarily on connections with family and friends. Others depict traditions such as the making and sharing of food and celebration of special events. Still others depict the beauty of nature, neighborhoods throughout the city, or new ways to see details of everyday life. Their captions and autobiographical accounts reveal deeply-held hopes and dreams and reveal what it has been like to leave a homeland in order to build a new life for themselves and their children in the U.S.
  • Narrows Center for the Arts, 16 Anawan Street
  • Fall River, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-324-1926
  • email: aklimt@umassd.edu
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

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