Events

Friday, August 17, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week.
Friday, August 17, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Porochista Khakpour, author of "Brain on Fire" and "Darkness Visible," will discuss her career, work and forthcoming memoir "Sick" with cultural critic Kate Bolick.
Saturday, August 18, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Come walk the Liberty and Union Downtown tour! Join us for a free, one-hour guided tour of Historic Downtown Taunton. Our one-mile walking tour highlights some of the important architectural, cultural, and commercial sites between Church Green and Taunton Green. A great way to learn about the city, from its earliest days through the present. These tours are the third Saturday of every month, May through October.
Friday, August 24, 2018 3:00 PM3:45 PM
Taryn Simon's monumental installations- A Cold Hole and Assembled Audience -examine the ways in which individual intention and public performance collide in the ancient rituals of cold-water immersion and applause. On MASS MoCA's Free Fun Friday, join Associate Curator Alexandra Foradas for two free, public talks on the social history of applause, and on the scientific, historical, and religious context of cold-water immersion.
Friday, August 24, 2018 11:00 AM11:45 AM
Taryn Simon's monumental installations- A Cold Hole and Assembled Audience -examine the ways in which individual intention and public performance collide in the ancient rituals of cold-water immersion and applause. On MASS MoCA's Free Fun Frida, join Associate Curator Alexandra Foradas for two free, public talks on the social history of applause, and on the scientific, historical, and religious context of cold-water immersion
Friday, August 31, 2018
To honor the Bicentennial Celebration, the Frederick Douglass Neighborhood Assocation has created a traveling exhibit that tells the amazing story of Frederick Douglass and connects him to the diversity of Brockton today. Original pieces by Brockton artists highlight the connection of Douglass to Haiti, Cape Verde, Ireland, women and veterans. The display will be in the Main Post Office in Brockton in March and April, and in August will travel to the Main Branch of the Brockton Public Library.
Tuesday, September 4, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
For decades Martha C. Nussbaum has been an acclaimed scholar and humanist, earning dozens of honors for her books and essays. In "The Monarchy of Fear" she turns her attention to the current political crisis that has polarized America since the 2016 election. Although today's atmosphere is marked by partisanship, divisive rhetoric, and the inability of two halves of the country to communicate with one another, Nussbaum focuses on what so many pollsters and pundits have overlooked: the political is always emotional.
Wednesday, September 5, 2018 4:00 PM5:00 PM
Heidi Pitlor, editor of The Best American Short Stories, will delve deep into the life of Geraldine Brooks, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "People of the Book and The Secret Chord." Proudly sponsored by Canyon Ranch Lenox.
Saturday, September 8, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome. For September we will be reading "Bellamy's Bride: The Search for Maria Hallett of Cape Cod," by Kathleen Brunelle (2010). Venture back to Cape Cod in 1715, when Maria Hallett fell in love with pirate captain "Black Sam" Bellamy, to hear the true history of their fates and the legends their story inspired.
Sunday, September 9, 2018 12:00 PM4:00 PM
Meet costumed reenactors showcasing 18th century trades and activities on the lawn beside Buckman Tavern, including yarn spinning, chocolate making, medicine, singing, dancing, and more. Free and open to the public!
Monday, September 10, 2018 7:00 PM
Soon after publication on September 30, 1868, Little Women became an enormous bestseller and one of America's favorite novels. In "Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still Matters," Anne Boyd Rioux sees the novel's beating heart in Alcott's portrayal of family resilience and her honest look at the struggles of girls growing into women. In gauging its current status, Rioux shows why Little Women remains a book with such power that people carry its characters and spirit throughout their lives.
Tuesday, September 11, 2018 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
Thursday, September 13, 2018 5:00 PM7:30 PM
Join us for an evening of celebration and stimulating conversation as we present the first MAAH Stone Book Award, sponsored by the Museum of African American History Boston and Nantucket and the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation. The MAAH Stone Book Award honors the authors of exceptional non-fiction literature that celebrates African American history and culture. The award includes a $25,000 prize. Pre-award reception starts at 5:00 PM; award ceremony starts at 6:30 PM.
  • 46 Joy St. Beacon Hill
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 216-408-6558
  • email: acole@maah.org
  • cost: Free
Thursday, September 13, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us for a panel discussion around movements that led to education reform in Worcester, part of the "Resistance & Movements: Puerto Ricans in Worcester from the 60's to Today" series.
Friday, September 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Come to one of the best preserved and renowned GAR halls to hear Robert Foster's lecture on the Confederate Flag: 'Symbol of Hate, not Heritage'. The author of the book 'Blue is just a Word' is vice president of Lynn Massachusetts' General Lander Civil War Roundtable, a lifetime member of The Lincoln Forum of Gettysburg, The Lincoln Group of Boston and past session musician for a major record label in London, England.
Friday, September 14, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
"Brief Evidence of Heaven" is a poetic meditation on biography. This book turns the facts and stories of Anna Murray Douglass into songs. Nzadi Keita has masterfully resurrected a forgotten voice, injecting breath and pulse into a woman too often and easily relegated to backdrop. This is a history deftly crafted, enhanced by the skills of a poet who floods this necessary story with light.
Saturday, September 15, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
As part of the 200th anniversary of the life of Frederick Douglass, author Nzadi Keita will read from "Brief Evidence of Heaven," a book of persona poems that give voice to Anna Douglass's life and times as she supported her family and her husband. Nzadi will pay homage to the woman who worked as an advocate and abolitionist in her own right.
Saturday, September 15, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Come walk the Liberty and Union Downtown Walking Tour! Join us for a free, one-hour guided tour of Historic Downtown Taunton. Our one-mile walking tour highlights some of the important architectural, cultural, and commercial sites between Church Green and Taunton Green. A great way to learn about the city, from its earliest days through the present. These tours are the third Saturday of every month, May through October.
Monday, September 17, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Celeste-Marie Bernier reads from her work, "If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection." If I Survive sheds light on the private life of Douglass the family man and collects many of his letters to and from his family for the first time. If I Survive situates the lives and works of Douglass and his family within the social, political, historical, and cultural contexts in which they lived and worked. Each unafraid to die for their cause, they dedicated their lives to the emancipation of the slave and to social justice by every means necessary.
Monday, September 17, 2018 6:00 PM
Learn about the curious case of Joseph and Mary Wyman and their daughter, Susan Wyman of Medford who may have been the subject of Medford author Susanna Rowson's last novel, Lucy Temple (published posthumously in 1828).
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Come join the Citizens of Massachusetts to protest the Fugitive Slave Law. Taken from the Lynn and Boston newspapers of the time, we will re-enact reactions 'from the record' of our past citizens. Speakers include local politicians, social justice activists, educators and writers.
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 7:00 PM
When the paper mill in Groveton, NH closed after being the economic engine of the community for decades, the town fell on hard times. This discussion will focus on what became of the town, how women fought for equal pay and benefits, and how the factory's closing impacted the family unit.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers with audience participation in a moderated discussion. Participants will be able to carefully handle and closely view 4 to 6 objects from the Society's collections.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
A discussion of five remarkable women, including Amelia Earhart, who fought against entrenched prejudice for the chance to race planes alongside men.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 5:45 PM9:30 PM
Gloucester Stage's 2018 Season is full of fabulous stories, steeped in history and classic literature. The Page2Stage book group through Sawyer Free Library will discuss William McFeely's award winning biography, "Frederick Douglass" followed by a production of Gloucester Stage's "The Agitators." This new play tells of the enduring but tempestuous friendship of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass. Young abolitionists when they met in Rochester in the 1840s, they were full of hopes, dreams, and a common purpose. They agitated the nation, they agitated each other and, in doing so, they helped shape the Constitution and the course of American history. Registration is free with discount theater tickets available for registered members.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Library of Congress has designated American Cookery (1796) by Amelia Simmons one of the eighty-eight "Books That Shaped America." Its recognition as "the first American cookbook" has attracted an enthusiastic modern audience of historians, food journalists, and general readers, yet until now American Cookery has not received the sustained scholarly attention it deserves. Keith Stavely and Kathleen Fitzgerald's "United Tastes" fills this gap by providing a detailed examination of the social circumstances and culinary tradition that produced this American classic.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 4:00 PM5:00 PM
Join us and for a panel discussion with award-wining educator Donovan Livingston, literary advocate Ty Allan Jackson, and psychology professor Dr. Eden-Renee Hayes as they examine the importance of representation in education and media.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us for a panel discussion on the riots of Great Brook Valley, part of the "Resistance & Movements: Puerto Ricans in Worcester from the 60's to Today" series.
Friday, September 21, 2018 8:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer and historian DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN for a discussion of her highly anticipated latest book, "Leadership: In Turbulent Times." In Leadership, Goodwin draws upon the four presidents she has studied most closely--Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)--to show how they recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized as leaders by others. Although set apart in background, abilities, and temperament, these men shared a fierce ambition and a deep-seated resilience that enabled them to surmount uncommon hardships. At their best, all four were guided by a sense of moral purpose. At moments of great challenge, they were able to summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others.
Sunday, September 23, 2018 5:30 PM7:30 PM
Historic re-enactor, Jessa Piaia, will present a one-person interpretation of pioneer aviatrix Amelia Earhart entitled "Meet Amelia Earhart (1897-1937): First Lady of the Air". The program is set in 1936, when Earhart was a popular speaker on the national circuit and preparing for take-off for the around-the-world flight in 1937. Clad in basic aviator gear and bearing a striking resemblance to the subject of her character portrayal, Ms. Piaia uses drama to reveal the accomplishments, struggles, and contributions of women to American history.
Tuesday, September 25, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome UMass Lowell philosophy professor JOHN KAAG for a discussion of his latest book, "Hiking with Nietzsche: On Becoming Who You Are." The book is a tale of two philosophical journeys--one made by Kaag as an introspective young man of nineteen, the other seventeen years later in radically different circumstances: he is now a husband and father, and his wife and small child are in tow. "Hiking with Nietzsche" is a fascinating exploration not only of Nietzsche's ideals but of how his experience of living relates to us as individuals in the twenty-first century.
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 7:00 PM
Adam Smith is now widely regarded as the greatest economist of all time. But what he really thought, and the implications of his ideas, remain fiercely contested. Was he an eloquent advocate of capitalism and individual freedom? A prime mover of "market fundamentalism"? An apologist for human selfishness? Or something else entirely? In "Adam Smith," political philosopher Jesse Norman dispels the myths and caricatures and provides a far more complex portrait of the man.
Thursday, September 27, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
"Forged in Crisis", by celebrated Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn, spotlights five masters of crisis: polar explorer Ernest Shackleton; President Abraham Lincoln; legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson. What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? In delivering the answers to those questions, Nancy Koehn offers a remarkable template by which to judge those in our own time to whom the public has given its trust.
Sunday, October 7, 2018 2:00PM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society and local historian Richard Heath for a walking tour of the imagination. Not one square inch remains of the Forest Hills of forty years ago; the Southwest Corridor and the Casey Arborway obliterated all architectural landmarks from that era. And yet the vista and connection that Frederick Law Olmsted once designed and supervised for the parkway between the Arboretum and Franklin Park (most of which was destroyed in 1952 for the Casey Overpass) have been remade. Our walk will follow Olmsted's plan (and end at the lower busway of Forest Hills Station). The tour will also cover the original transportation patterns which characterized Forest Hills well before Olmsted made his plan, those of the Norfolk & Bristol Turnpike and the Boston & Providence Railroad. Tour participants will also learn about the architecture along the parkway and at the station. Simply meet your guide at the Arnold Arboretum. Event will be cancelled if rain.
  • Forest Hills Gates of the Arnold Arboretum, Arborway and South St
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM3:30 PM
This is the story of how America's first women soldiers helped win World War I, earned the vote, and fought the U.S. Army for the veterans' benefits they had earned.
Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Join us for a panel discussion on Puerto Rican youth activism in the past and present, part of the "Resistance & Movements: Puerto Ricans in Worcester from the 60's to Today" series.
Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Come spend a beautiful Autumn morning for this special tour of abolitionist graves and storytelling by Scholar Julia Greene.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:30 PM9:00 PM
Known widely as a simple and courageous mother figure, in fact Harriet Tubman was an intelligent, crafty, fearless visionary who transcended assumptions about black women's abilities, leading scores of enslaved people to freedom. Author of the first adult biography of Tubman, historian Kate Clifford Larson will share new Tubman scholarship and describe recent public history initiatives related to her life and role in the Underground Railroad. Copies of Bound for the Promised Land will be available for purchase and signing.
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.royallhouse.org
  • email: director@royallhouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; general admission $10.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Colonel Earl "The Pearl" Wederbrook, USMC (Ret) on a short trip through time to compare and contrast the occupation of Boston in 1776 with Berlin in 1945 and Baghdad in 2004. Col. Wederbrook will discuss and analyze the military, political, economic, social and moral aspects and consequences of using the military to quell civil unrest, occupy conquered territory or aid in nation building. Afterwards, join us for a reception and conversation with Col. Wederbrook, a representative of the Office of Veterans Services, and several veterans from post-9/11 deployments for an intimate discussion on what it's like being the occupier in a foreign land and how to adapt to civilian life upon return home.
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Join Mass Humanities in conferring the Governor's Award upon three exemplary honorees whose public actions have been grounded in an appreciation of the humanities and have enhanced civic life in the Commonwealth. The honorees: Ellen Dunlap, David Harris, Nancy Netzer, and David Tebaldi. Reception begins at 5:00 PM, followed by dinner and The Governor's Awards in the Humanities.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 3:30 PM5:00 PM
This year's forum will explore the role of the humanities in addressing what many consider the most urgent challenge facing the world today. As our nation was founded, debates arose on how to achieve the proper balance of power between (among others) a more landed aristocracy and laboring citizens; between a central executive, a representative legislature, and the courts; between educated experts and ordinary voters; between private interests and the public good. History has proven the American system of government to be remarkably resilient managing difficult crises and serving as a model for other emerging democracies throughout the globe. Some question, however, whether our current national and international institutions can solve the looming global environmental challenges of our time. It is impossible to debate potential solutions if we cannot first define the problem. This forum will feature historians, scientists, policy makers, activists and, we hope, a cross section of the general public.
Saturday, November 3, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
The morning of November 25th, 1856, Mary Chipman Lawrence set sail aboard the whaling ship Addison bound for the Pacific on a voyage that would last three and a half years. In this performance, Mary will bring forth from her meticulously kept journal, the joys and tribulations of life at sea with her husband, Captain Samuel Lawrence, and their daughter Minnie. The sights and sounds of foreign ports and their inhabitants, the sailors' sea shanties, the surprisingly robust social life amongst whaling ships, and the challenging everyday details, all will come to life as Mary takes you on a journey so real, you'll feel the pitch of the ship and the spray over the rails. Come join us as re-enactor Anne Barrett takes you through the adventures of Mary Chipman Lawrence!
Thursday, November 15, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
In his new book, Vincent Luti focuses on an aspect of our history that has been largely overlooked; the 18th century Taunton River Basin School of Gravestone Carvers. This rich heritage of early American folk artifacts is a precious resource for scholars of all stripes, and something to be enjoyed by an appreciative public as well. The native work of this overlooked area now has its deserved place in the story of American folk art culture as evidenced in its early gravestones and their carvers. Mr. Luti is one of the most knowledgeable people in the world regarding the history of tombstone carvers in New England. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 pm with the talk to begin at 7 pm.
Monday, November 26, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
A fun art event where youth will paint or draw what signifies an African family. Artwork will be displayed and the jury will choose winners using criteria like most detailed, color theme, use of space, and creativeness. Fun art activities for all ages available. Come one, come all, and let's dive into the fine art imagination with Abel!
Saturday, December 1, 2018 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Become a part of local history! Bring us a photo taken in the Taunton area and let us scan it for our digital collection. We'll give you back the original and your image will become a part of our archive collection. Bring in your photographs, preferably loose rather than in an album, and unframed. Anything up through 11 x 17 inches is welcome. Please provide us any information you have about the photos. People, places, events, local landmarks, holiday displays--share your photographs, memories, and even help us solves some mysteries! No more than five per person, please. Visit those attics, sort those closets, and dig out those boxes of mementos to help us add to the photographic record of our local community!
Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In the shadow of the Holocaust, what is the world's continuing responsibility to prevent genocide and mass atrocity crimes and hold accountable those who commit them? In recent decades genocide and mass atrocities have been committed in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, Darfur, Libya and Syria, among other places. The world stood by and did nothing in several of these situations, but intervened in others under the UN doctrine of responsibility to protect. Today, nationalism and authoritarianism are on the rise, the US has withdrawn from human rights leadership, and support for implementing the responsibility to protect has diminished in the UN. John Shattuck is a former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor who participated in the successful international effort to end the genocidal war in Bosnia, and helped establish the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.
Saturday, December 8, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For December we will be reading A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens. A Christmas Carol has long been one of the most beloved stories in the English language. As much a part of the holiday season as holly, mistletoe, and evergreen wreaths, this perennial favorite continues to delight new readers and rekindle thoughts of charity and goodwill.
Thursday, December 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Enjoy a dramatic reading of the classic holiday tale by Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. Paul Hayden narrates, along with various members of OCHM's board and community playing their parts of the story while you enjoy refreshments sure to transport you back to Dickensian England. All ages are welcome to join us for this nostalgic evening to celebrate the holiday season.
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.
Saturday, April 7, 2018 10:00 AMSaturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM
Tapping into History features Greenfield Tap & Die, Lunt Silversmiths, and D. B. Kellogg's Grocery Store, uncovers the connections between them, and examines the lives of employers and employees in the early 20th century. Every Friday 10 AM to 2 PM, April 13 to October 29, first and second Saturdays of each month April through October, 10 AM to 2 PM. By appointment year round!
Thursday, July 5, 2018 10:00 AMSaturday, September 1, 2018 4:00 PM
The Old Colony History Museum announces the return of a collaborative museum program, Passport to History. Passport to History is a joint effort of eleven local museums, spearheaded by Old Colony History Museum, to share and explore the fantastic and diverse history of southeastern Massachusetts. Visitors will have a chance to explore eleven area museums and learn about the exciting and varied history of the Old Colony region. Take a photo at your favorite spot (or all of them!) and tag us with #PassportToHistory to share a piece of history!

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