Events

Sunday, January 1, 2017 Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Who am I? Where am I? These are the fundamental questions proposed by the humanities. Inquiries related to local history, literature, and education, inspire us to think deeply about the places where we live and how our identity fits into the context of our community and the seasons. Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts is a bimonthly publication produced by Hilltown Families that sheds light on embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts. With these downloadable seasonal itineraries, self-directed teens, lifelong learners, and families are encouraged to engage together in cultural opportunities that support similar interests, resulting in a shared history, strengthening sense of place.
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Discover Framingham's fashion from a new perspective! Children ages 7 and up are invited to cut, color and play with paper dolls ranging from colonial soldiers to 1920s flappers. Fashion coloring pages and a scavenger hunt of the History in the Stitches exhibit will also be available. No registration required.
Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:30 PM8:30 PM
This event will combine Professor Kevin McCarthy?EUR(tm)s presentation of film clips from his work-in-progress documentary on the Market Basket boycott with testimonies from several current and former Fitchburg area Market Basket employees involved in the boycott.
  • Ellis White Lecture Hall, Hammond Building, Fitchburg State University
  • Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 978-665-3264
  • email: kmccar13@fitchburgstate.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, February 23, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Let us help you share your story! The Berkshire Immigrant Stories Project help participants with the process of digitizing a chosen object, narrating their story, and uploading them to the "Your Story, Our Story" website. This is the first of three workshops this spring. Laptops, scanners, digital cameras provided on site. Food and drink provided. Writing help from BCC Writing Center, Athenaeum Literacy Volunteers, Translator help from BCC students will be available. The workshop is open to all. For more information on participating in the project or volunteering, see contact info below.
Thursday, February 23, 2017 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome the Harvard Kennedy School's MARY GRAHAM, author and co-director of the Transparency Policy Project, for a discussion of her latest book, "Presidents' Secrets: The Use and Abuse of Hidden Power."
Thursday, February 23, 2017 7:00PM9:30PM
Is it possible to fake your own death in the 21st century? With six figures of student loan debt, author Elizabeth Greenwood was tempted to find out. She set off on a foray into the world of death fraud, where for $30,000 a consultant can make you disappear, possibly forever. Along the way, she considered the role of humor in illuminating and exploring our darkest impulses. Reading from her recent book "Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud" (2016), Greenwood will introduce us to men and women desperate enough to lose their identities -- and their families -- to begin again. What drives our all-too-human desire to escape the lives we lead?
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, February 25, 2017 11:00 AMMonday, February 27, 2017 4:00 PM
Join us for celebrations and explorations of African life and culture! We will dance, play, socialize, and more! Each Saturday will also have a special theme with activities for children and their families; this week, the theme is African Jewelry.
Saturday, February 25, 2017 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Join us for a friendly afternoon of free entertainment to wrap up school vacation week with a matinee showing of Disney's Ruby Bridges. The true story of Ruby Bridges, an African-American girl who, in 1960 at age 6, helped to integrate and the segregarding of all-white schools of New Orleans. Popcorn and drinks will be available.
Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:30 PM3:00 PM
Timothy Murphy, professor at Worcester State University discussed the relationship between gender/sexuality and belonging among a Bohemian community in growing urban interiors of the Brazilian Northeast. Robert L. Green, Religious Studies professor at the College of the Holy Cross examines how religious and cultural traditions have blended together and inform Candomble in Brazil.
  • Worcester Center for Craft, 25 Sagamore Rd
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: wccregistration@worcester.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, February 25, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
In 2005 Ann Goodwin donated over 300 glass-plate negatives to the Florence History Museum. Most of these images were taken by J.W. Bird, her husband's grandfather (whose store continues under his name to this day, near its original location at the corner of Main and Maple streets.) The photographs capture, in rare candid moments, the exuberance of the father, his daughter Lena, and their many friends. A wonderful cyanotype memory book of the photos remains with the family along with the original camera. Steve Strimer will present a selection of these images in a slide show and commentary. A copy of the memory book will be shown at the talk.
Wednesday, March 1, 2017 7:00PM9:30PM
For Chris Edwards, a former advertising creative director, changing his gender from female to male took balls?and a damn good sense of humor. How did he find the courage to come out at a company board meeting -- To endure twenty-eight painful and extensive surgeries -- To show up at his ten-year high school reunion? During a reading from his funny and poignant memoir "Balls: It Takes Some to Get Some" (2016), Edwards will share how humor helped him re-brand himself and gain acceptance from his family, friends, and colleagues at a time when the word "transgender" was almost non-existent. A book signing will follow. Copies of Edwards? book will be on sale at the event. Co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Women's and Gender Studies Program.
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Thursday, March 2, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Let us help you share your story! The Berkshire Immigrant Stories Project help participants with the process of digitizing a chosen object, narrating their story, and uploading them to the "Your Story, Our Story" website. This is the second of three workshops this spring. Laptops, scanners, digital cameras provided on site. Food and drink provided. Writing help from BCC Writing Center, Athenaeum Literacy Volunteers, Translator help from BCC students will be available. The workshop is open to all. For more information on participating in the project or volunteering, see contact info below.
Thursday, March 2, 2017 6:30 PM9:00 PM
A live performance of "The Giver" by American Place Theatre preceded by a facilitated discussion of the book. Martha Ucci will address themes of the novel and how they relate to the social contract and our modern lives. For more information and to purchase tickets visit or call the box office at 508-994-2900
Friday, March 3, 2017 9:00 AM12:00 PM
This is a fourm for caregivers, both family and professional, to explore how art may serve as a means of communication and engagement for people with Alzheimer's and other dementia. Following a presentation by artist Michael James, there will be a panel discussion leading to an interactive audience discussion and reflection session. The program will conclude with refreshments and networking.
Saturday, March 4, 2017 11:00 AM5:00 PM
Dr. Joseph Moser will provide historical and cultural contexts of the Great Depression to introduce two satirical comedies about individuals struggling for dignity in the workplace, and he will lead discussions with members of the public about "Modern Times" (1936) and "The Devil and Miss Jones" (1941). Fitchburg State University and the Leominster Public Library are collaborating with Mount Wachusett Community College on this event.
Wednesday, March 8, 2017 1:00 PM2:00 PM
Dr. Joseph Moser and Marcia Ladd will lead an informal discussion of Robert Putnam's "Our Kids: the American Dream in Crisis" with members of the public.
  • Fitchburg Public Library, 610 Main Street
  • Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 978-829-1780
  • email: mladd@cwmars.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, March 9, 2017 3:00 PM
Vasco Pires, a Falmouth resident and Cape Verdean immigrant, discusses how Cape Verdean families helped shape the demographics and economics of the Upper Cape region.
Thursday, March 9, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Enjoy tea and cookies while viewing a short lecture that will take you more deeply into the Framingham History Center's History in the Stitches exhibition. All guests are invited to stay and view the exhibition. We knew Edna Dean Proctor was a local poetess during the Civil War era, but since we chose her 1870s tea gown for our exhibit we decided to do more digging. Storyteller Libby Franck will discuss Edna's remarkable life including a solo trip to Russia. Libby is not able to join us for a live presentation on this day however, and Access Framingham has recorded her for our viewing. Space is limited.
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 7:00 PM
Dava Sobel, an Emmy Award winning author and former science writer for the New York Times, discusses how women working at Harvard in the 19th century changed the course of astronomical study, in spite of being ostracized in the process.
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
Public historian Edward Gordon presents a talk and discussion on Somerville's economic history.
Thursday, March 16, 2017 4:30PM6:00PM
In the United States, much of the current debate around gun control focuses on the Second Amendment. But struggles between government efforts to regulate gun ownership and public gun culture date back to 16th and 17th-century England. When the English government tried to limit possession and use of guns to wealthy subjects, the policy was met with outrage and willful disobedience. In this talk, historian Lois Schwoerer (George Washington University) will examine the impact of gun ownership and regulation on both the government and private subject of early modern England. Clark University professor Mark Miller (Political Science/Law and Society) will offer commentary. Co-sponsored by Early Modernists Unite, the Higgins School of Humanities, and the Department of History.
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, March 18, 2017 7:00 PM10:00 PM
Wild Ways: Corridors of Life explores the cutting edge of Conservation Biology to discover how the world's parks and preserves can be connected and better function as the last enclaves of wild nature. Today most wildlife remaining on Planet Earth are confined to designated parks and preserves. These protected areas, from the Serengeti Plains to Yellowstone National Park, are crucial - but they are fast becoming islands of nature in a sea of human development, which places these animals in danger of extinction. Wild Ways: Corridors of Life probes a promising solution to the world wide fragmentation of wildlife habitat - Connectivity Conservation. Wild Ways takes viewers around the world to some of the most dramatic natural areas on earth where conservation biologists are helping vanishing species with innovative solutions. We learn what elephants, lions, elk, grizzly bears, tigers, and jaguars need: room to roam, neighboring populations for genetic diversity, and connected ecosystems that allow migration and adaptation to a changing climate. Following the documentary, panelists from Mass Audubon will address the importance of wildlife corridors in protecting open space, moderated by Heather Goldstone of WCAI.
Saturday, March 18, 2017 2:00 PM3:30PM
Dave Dixon's new book, "The Lost Gettysburg Address" is a fast-paced narrative that tells the remarkable life story of Charles Anderson, who kept turning up at critical places and moments in the Civil War. The book features a complete printing of Anderson's lost speech and his hand-drawn map of the Stones River Battlefield, both published for the first time. David Dixon likes nothing more than spending hours dumpster-diving in archives and throughout cyberspace. He has published numerous articles in scholarly journals and magazines. Most focus on Black history and on Union sympathizers in the Civil War South. He remains intrigued by the problem of defining "loyalty" in the context of the Civil War. Refreshments will be available at 1:30 p.m. and the lecture will begin at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 7:00PM9:30PM
Ferne Pearlstein's feature documentary, "THE LAST LAUGH," proceeds from the premise that the Holocaust would seem to be an absolutely off-limits topic for comedy. But is it? History shows that even the victims of the Nazi concentration camps used humor as a means of survival and resistance. Still, any hint of comedy in connection with this horror risks diminishing the suffering of millions. So where is the line? If we make the Holocaust off limits, what are the implications for other controversial subjects -- 9/11, AIDS, racism -- in a society that prizes freedom of speech? Co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, and Screen Studies.
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Even when it was new, Stonehurst was a destination for school groups. The socially conscience Paine family welcomed students from industrial institutes founded and run by Robert Treat Paine out to their country place in Waltham each year to escape the city. Be the first to hear Dr. Jennifer Pustz's discoveries in the history of these early vocational schools and their excursions to Stonehurst. Begin to see the place through a different lens, and then share your ideas for new programming. Cohosted by the Friends of Stonehurst and the Waltham Historical Society. This project is funded in part by Mass Humanities, whose grants inspire thoughtful conversations and civic engagement throughout Massachusetts.
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:00 PM5:00 PM
The 2017 Edith Wharton Writers-in-Residence - Christene Barberich, global editor in chief and co-founder of Refinery29, Donna M. Lucey author of "Archie and Amelie: Love and Madness in the Gilded Age," and Vanessa Manko, author of "The Invention of Exile" - will discuss their past and forthcoming works, their careers, and their experiences writing in the house where Edith Wharton penned many of her most popular works. They will also touch on how Edith Wharton's literary legacy has shaped and inspired their own works, and how she continues to influence female writers in the 21st century. The discussion will be moderated by 2016 Writer-in-Residence and Mount Trustee, Claire McMillan.
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 7:30 PM9:00 PM
J. L. Bell, a co-editor of "Colonial Comics," will lead a panel of participating authors and illustrators discussing the stories and artwork that make up this innovative graphic anthology series on New England's history. Volume I tells lesser known stories of the years 1620-1750, and the new Volume II features the period 1750-1775. Featuring an array of writing and illustration styles, the series tells stories about Puritans and free thinkers, Pequots and Jewish settlers, female business owners and playwrights, grave digging medical students, instigators of civil disobedience, college students, rum traders, freemen, and slaves. Copies of both volumes will be available for purchase and signing.
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.RoyallHouse.org
  • email: Director@RoyallHouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; $5 non-members.
Saturday, March 25, 2017 11:00 AM4:00 PM
Join us for celebrations and explorations of African life and culture! We will dance, play, socialize, and more! Each Saturday will also have a special theme with activities for children and their families; this week, the theme is African Toys.
Saturday, March 25, 2017 2:00 PM4:30 PM
Screening of a documentary film about Carlos Arredondo followed by discussion. Carlos Arredondo is best known for saving a life during the Boston Marathon bombing. But the story begins a decade earlier with the death of his own son, Alex, in the Iraq War.
  • Rabb Lecture Hall, Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 536-5400
  • web: www.bpl.org
  • email: ask@bpl.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, March 28, 2017 7:00PM9:30PM
Challenges to America's most sacred myths fuel the traditions of vernacular humor, which asserts faith in ordinary Americans and mistrust of elites. Spoof presidential campaigns by ostensibly ordinary citizens -- heirs of Brother Jonathan, folklore's quintessential American -- have mocked the ideological contradictions of presidential campaigns whose vernacular values nonetheless yield elite results. Professor Judith Yaross Lee (Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University) will consider how nearly two hundred years of spoof campaigns in cartoon, video, newspaper features, and other formats highlight values and visions always at stake in the presidential race, but especially in the candidacy of Donald Trump. Co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Bland Fund of the Department of Political Science.
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 3:00 PM4:00 PM
Paul K. Chappell graduated from West Point in 2002, was deployed to Iraq, and left active duty in 2009. He grew up in Alabama, the son of a half-black and half-white father who fought in the Korean and Vietnam wars, and a Korean mother. Paul now believes in nonviolence, and he is the author of the "Road to Peace" series, a seven-book series about waging peace, ending war, the art of living, and what it means to be human. Chappell serves as the Peace Leadership Director for the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Lecturing across the country and internationally, he also teaches courses and workshops on Peace Leadership.
Thursday, March 30, 2017 Sunday, April 9, 2017
Emilie du Chatelet is best known for her fifteen-year liaison with Voltaire but she was more than a great man's mistress. She was one of the leading interpreters of modern physics during the Age of Enlightenment. In this play Emilie must defend her life by tallying her achievements in Love and Philosophy-and searching for a formula that will convince the world of her worth.
Saturday, April 1, 2017
Register your family for the 4 part series of Family Adventures in Reading featuring professional storyteller, Diane Edgecomb. Families with children ages 6-10 will explore and keep 6 great picturebooks over our 4 meetings along with a healthy snack and arts and crafts activity. Sponsored by the Plainville Public Library and held at An Unlikely Story Bookstore, third floor. Please only register if you can attend all 4 Saturdays, April 1, 8 , 22 and 29, 10:30am - 12:00pm. Parking is available in the lot across the intersection from the bookstore.
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 11:00 AM3:00 PM
Several UMass Boston students from around the world will speak about their experiences having to leave their homeland and then face the challenges of adjusting to life in the United States. The William Joiner Institute has partnered with teachers from four schools in the Boston area (Boston Tech Academy, Cambridge Rindge and Latin, EMK Health Careers Academy, and Seekonk High School) who will bring students who would like to participate in the symposium. We are hoping the symposium will be a forum where stories of exodus and arrival can be told and heard by a diverse group of faculty and students.
Thursday, April 6, 2017 12:15 PM2:15 PM
Let us help you share your story! The Berkshire Immigrant Stories Project help participants with the process of digitizing a chosen object, narrating their story, and uploading them to the "Your Story, Our Story" website. This is the last of three workshops this spring. Laptops, scanners, digital cameras provided on site. Food and drink provided. Writing help from BCC Writing Center, Athenaeum Literacy Volunteers, Translator help from BCC students will be available. The workshop is open to all. For more information on participating in the project or volunteering, see contact info below.
Thursday, April 6, 2017 Thursday, April 27, 2017
Participate in a four-session book discussion of Jana Laiz's "Weeping Under This Same Moon." "Weeping" is the three time award winning novel, based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives. The final session is a special presentation by the author. Sessions are Thursdays from 2:30-3:30 PM on April 6, 13, 20, and 27. Books will be made available to participants.
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 7:00 PM
Nina Sankovitch, Connecticut author and graduate of Tufts University and Harvard Law School, discusses the Lowells, a remarkable family involved in the founding of a new nation and who shaped many aspects of it, including politics and religion. Among its family members was industrialist Francis Cabot Lowell, who essentially began the American Industrial Revolution; American Romantic poet James Russell Lowell; and Amy Lowell, the twentieth century poet who lived openly in a Boston Marriage with the actress Ada Dwyer Russell.
Thursday, April 13, 2017 3:00 PM4:00 PM
This is the story of war, refugees, and humanitarian relief, told through the eyes of children and the people who helped them. In this lecture, Belgian best-selling author Anne Provoost will share the harrowing story of World War I refugee children, their families, and the kind strangers who rescued them. Provoost's research on this historical moment uncovered a link to her own grandmother, Anna Vandewalle. Anna arrived in Paris with the first convoy of rescued children in 1915 and stayed in France until 1919. Vandewalle came into the care of The Children of Flanders Rescue Committee, the charity initiative of Edith Wharton.
Friday, April 21, 2017 12:00 PM
Join us for a poetry reading and presentation by Martin Espada, a critically acclaimed poet and author. Espada has published almost twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. He has dedicated much of his career to the pursuit of social justice, including fighting for Latino rights and reclaiming the historical record. His critically acclaimed collections of poetry have been finalists for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.The Jonathan Edwards Library will have copies of his books on reserve and for loan.
  • Koussevitzky Arts Center, Boland Theatre, Berkshire Community College 1350 West St
  • Pittsfield, Berkshire County, MA (Berkshire)
  • contact: 413-236-2103
  • email: laney@berkshirecc.edu
  • cost: Free and open to the public
Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:00 PM10:00 PM
There is an epidemic of extinction of silence on our planet. World renowned nature sound recordist and acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton works to protect the few remaining quiet places from noise pollution so that we may listen to nature at its most natural. The film takes place on the Olympic Peninsula, the largest coniferous forest and only rain forest in the continental United States. It also features his world renowned and award-winning sound recordings. Nature sounds have been recognized as crucial indicators of environmental quality ever since the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring. Traveling across the planet to every continent since the late 1960s, noted musician and soundscape ecologist Dr. Bernie Krause has recorded more than 15,000 species - marine and terrestrial. Panel Moderator: Mindy Todd, WCAI
Thursday, April 27, 2017 2:30PM3:45 PM
"Weeping" is the three time award winning novel, based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives. Participation in the library book discussion that began on April 6th is not necessary in order to attend this special presentation by the author. A reception will follow.
Saturday, April 29, 2017 11:00 AM4:00 PM
Join us for celebrations and explorations of African life and culture! We will dance, play, socialize, and more! Each Saturday will also have a special theme with activities for children and their families; this week, the theme is African Musical Instruments.
Sunday, April 30, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Garden historian Kathryn Aalto will discuss how the magical forests of south east England inspired A.A. Milne to create the cherished tales of Winnie-the-Pooh and the Hundred Acre Wood. Aalto takes readers through an exploration of the real landscapes, shares iconic moments from the books, and celebrates the interplay of landscape and literature.
Monday, May 1, 2017 Tuesday, October 31, 2017
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 7:00 PM
Allison Lange, assistant professor of history at Wentworth Institute of Technology, Ph.D. from Brandeis University, is an historian who focuses on gender, culture and politics. She completed her work on her doctorate by focusing on women's suffrage and the 19th Amendment. She discusses women's rights and women's suffrage movements to trace the development of modern political campaigns.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 Sunday, October 29, 2017
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for tour dates and times.
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 10:30 AM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Thursday, June 1, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Sip a Tauntini and test your general knowledge during a night of trivia inspired by Taunton. Winners will receive a special prize. OCHM After Hours is a program for artists, aspiring artists, and young professionals (21 and older) looking for an evening for low-key, hands-on fun. Developed in conjunction with the Museum's art and history collections and special exhibitions, each OCHM After Hours program will include a variety of live music, hands-on art-making, food, beer, wine, cocktails and more! Each one will be different and offer a new way for people to get involved.
Saturday, June 10, 2017 1:00 PM3:00PM
Are you interested in music? Poetry? Storytelling? Do you want to learn more about these things? Join us for an afternoon program featuring local artists who will be sharing their songs, poems, stories, and artwork in a casual, friendly setting. You can come and just listen, or if you would like to participate, let us know as there is a limited number of open slots to share your work. Schedule: Ethel Fraga, poet Alan O'Hare, storyteller and more!
Sunday, June 11, 2017 12:00 PM6:00 PM
The Brockton Historical Society invites visitors to spend a fun "Sunday in the Park with George - Keith" in a recreated pop-up Campello Village of 1917. Visitors will see buildings that represent a slice of life. Visitors can ask the villagers "What was the Keith Theater? Who owned the small shops? What was it like attending the Huntington School? How did you feel when you arrived as an immigrant? Did you work in a shoe factory?" One of the most famous was run by George E. Keith - the WalkOver Company. Brockton today is a city of immigrants. By connecting face to face with our past, our purpose is to create common ground to build understanding and pride in our city.
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.

Exhibits

Friday, July 15, 2016 Wednesday, May 31, 2017
"Picturing Frederick Douglass," the first major exhibition of photographs of the famed abolitionist, promises to revolutionize our knowledge of race and photography in 19th-century America. Many were unpublished, forgotten for decades, and previously unseen by contemporary viewers. Several were taken in Boston. Together, the images trace Douglass's visual journey from self-emancipated man to firebrand abolitionist and elder statesman, and they narrate a photographic autobiography across a half-century of history. Douglass, who was in love with photography, sat for his portrait whenever possible, from his earliest known photograph in 1841 until his passing in 1895. As a result, he became the most photographed American of the 19th century; more photographed than President Abraham Lincoln. Picturing Frederick Douglass offers a visually stunning re-introduction to America's first black celebrity immediately recognizable in his own lifetime by millions.
  • 46 Joy St.
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: maah.org
  • cost: Admission by donation, Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
Friday, October 28, 2016 1:00 PMSaturday, April 29, 2017 4:00 PM
The Framingham History Center is unveiling an exhibition of its extensive costume collection with fashions ranging from tea-gowns to flapper dresses to an elaborate kimono representing the influence of Japanese design on ladies' salons across the country. These styles and the stories of the women who wore them provides a fascinating glimpse into their lives, their times, and their town. Parking: Please park on 3 Oak St. (street parking available) or in the Village Hall lot (2 Oak St.). Hours: 1:00-4:00 p.m., Wednesdays through Saturdays.

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