Events

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Important maritime landmarks dot the coastline. The House of the Seven Gables has been one for four centuries. Even more important to maritime safety, America's lighthouses have kept countless ships from wrecking, saved untold lives, and contributed mightily to the growth and prosperity of the nation. Eric Jay Dolin, the author of Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America, will share the dramatic story of these soaring coastal sentinels, using numerous slides to illuminate the beauty and grandeur of America's lighthouses. It is a riveting tale of nasty political battles, technological innovation, natural disasters, and war. But most of all it is a story about the male and female keepers, who, often with the invaluable assistance of their families, faithfully kept the lights shining and the fog signals blaring. A book signing for Brilliant Beacons will follow the talk.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • cost: $7, Free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 26, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, May 26, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
2016 is the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Harvard educated Misha Teramura looks at what it was like to be a playwright in Renaissance London; some of the actors for whom Shakespeare wrote; his friends and rivals, his patrons and publishers; and other aspects of “The Bard’s” life.
Friday, May 27, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, May 27, 2016 5:30 PM7:30 PM
It's a family friendly celebration of two exciting exhibitions - Tiny Titans: Dinosaur Eggs and Babies and Finding Raven: Art and Stories from the Northwest Coast. Explore the galleries, enjoy refreshments, discover the interactive stations, and hear the legends and stories. Please RSVP to 413.443.7171 ext. 313.
Saturday, May 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 28, 2016 10:00 AM5:00 PM
Travel with Raven to the Northwest Coast and experience the rich heritage of the Native peoples, portrayed in dramatic storytelling and striking art objects. Fantastic tales set in the oceans, streams, and forests of the Pacific Northwest are accompanied by totem poles, carved masks, and other ceremonial and utilitarian objects reflecting the traditions and artistry of the Kwakiutl, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit groups, among others. The exhibit features objects from the collection of Joan and Paul Gluck, one of the finest private collections of Pacific Northwest coastal art.
Saturday, May 28, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Sunday, May 29, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Many know the story of the Boston Massacre, but few know of the events that took place the day after, on March 6, 1770. Blood on the Snow is a new play by Patrick Gabridge, set and staged in the Council Chamber of the Old State House. Almost 250 years ago, in that very room, the leaders of Boston struggled to heal their town and unwittingly placed Massachusetts on the road to revolution.
  • Old State House, 206 Washington Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 720-1713
  • web: www.bostonmassacreplay.com/
  • cost: $17.50 - $25
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Beatles arrived in the United States on February 7, 1964, and immediately became a constant, compelling presence in fans’ lives. For the next six years, the band presented a nonstop deluge of sounds, words, images, and ideas, transforming the childhood and adolescence of millions of baby boomers. Beatleness explains how the band became a source of emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual nurturance in fans’ lives, creating a relationship that was historically unique. Looking at that relationship against the backdrop of the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, political assassinations, and other events of those tumultuous years, the book examines critically the often-heard assertion that the Beatles “changed everything” and shows how—through the interplay between the group, the fans, and the culture—that change came about.
Tuesday, May 31, 2016 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Session 1 of Common Good Reads discussion series that will cover texts that ask participants to consider the relationship between diversity, culture, migration, and the social contract.
  • Peabody Institute Library, Technology Lab, 82 Main Street
  • Peabody, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 531-0100
  • web: www.peabodylibrary.org
  • email: unger@noblenet.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, June 2, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Ada Gobetti's Partisan Diary is both diary and memoir. From a political and military point of view, the "Partisan Diary" provides firsthand knowledge of how the partisans in Piedmont fought, what obstacles they encountered, and who joined the struggle against the Nazis and the Fascists. The mountainous terrain and long winters of the Alpine regions (the site of many of their battles) and the ever-present threat of reprisals by German occupiers and their fascist partners exacerbated problems of organization among the various partisan groups. So arduous was their fight,that key military events--Italy's declaration of war on Germany, the fall of Rome, and the Allied landings on D-Day --appear in the diary as remote and almost unrelated incidents. Ada Gobetti writes of the heartbreak of mothers who lost their sons or watched them leave on dangerous missions of sabotage, relating it to worries about her own son Paolo.
Saturday, June 4, 2016 11:00AM
Walk along Green Street with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain’s development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district’s residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map with the starting point is on our website.
Saturday, June 4, 2016 6:30 PM9:30 PM
Outstanding multi-award-winning actor Brian Dennehy, recognized for his interpretation of many of Eugene O'Neill's complex characters, will be the guest of honor at their annual dinner on June 4, 2016 at Provincetown Town Hall. The gala is to support this fall's 11th festival, "Eugene O'Neill and Tennessee Williams: Beyond Success" with performances from theaters around the world throughout the charming seaside town from Sept 22-25, 2016. Following the dinner, a conversation with Dennehy will be led by renowned O'Neill scholar, Robert M. Dowling, author of "Eugene O'Neill: A Life in Four Acts". For more information, see www.twptown.org.
  • Provincetown Town Hall, 260 Commercial Street
  • Provincetown, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508)789-8366
  • email: info@twptown.org
  • cost: Varies. See http://www.twptown.org/annual-dinner-2016 for details.
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, June 5, 2016 3:00 P.M.5:00 P.M.
Renowned playwright Kirsten Greenidge will speak at this year’s annual benefit event on the museum grounds to support the preservation and interpretation of the Royall House and Slave Quarters. Author of Obie award-winning play "Milk Like Sugar," and "The Luck of the Irish," Greenidge's work shines a light on the intersection of race and class in America, and she enjoys the challenge of placing underrepresented voices on stage. "I like to write about the have nots," she says, "the outsiders.” She is currently writing 3 plays based in history, about Sally Hemings in Thomas Jefferson’s Paris home, seamstress Elizabeth Keckley’s friendship with Mary Todd Lincoln, and Belinda Sutton’s petition for a pension from Isaac Royall Jr.’s estate.
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Session 2 of a Common Good Reads discussion series that will cover texts that ask participants to consider the relationship between diversity, culture, migration, and the social contract.
  • Peabody Institute Library, Technology Lab, 82 Main Street
  • Peabody, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 531-0100
  • web: www.peabodylibrary.org
  • email: unger@noblenet.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been such a lengthy battle, involving so many men, situated on such a tiny piece of land. The battle, which lasted from 21 February 1916 until 19 December 1916 caused over an estimated 700,000 casualties (dead, wounded and missing). The battlefield was not even a square ten kilometres. From a strategic point of view there can be no justification for these atrocious losses. The battle degenerated into a matter of prestige of two nations—Germany and France--fighting literally for the sake of fighting.
Friday, June 10, 2016 4:00 PM5:00 PM
In September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within. Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation.
Saturday, June 11, 2016 5:307:30
The Great Barrington Historical Society and the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers invite you to join them on the terrace of a beautiful, historic mansion to enjoy cocktails and appetizers while taking in the breathtaking views of the surrounding Berkshire Hills. Tour the first and second floors, then hear a lecture by author Paula Uruburu about the Gilded Age mega-celebrity Evelyn Nesbit. Her biography of Miss Nesbit is entitled "American Eve: Evelyn Nesbit, Standford White, the Birth of the "It" Girl and the Crime of the Century."
Saturday, June 11, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to tour this neighborhood developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tour lasts between 60 and 90 minutes and canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Monday, June 13, 2016 8:30 AM4:30 PM
The 12th annual Massachusetts History Conference is leaping forward with a day filled with opportunities to meet, network, and collaborate with others in public history in the Commonwealth. "We" are local historical societies, libraries, town clerk offices, historic houses, larger historical organizations, and national historical parks, independent professionals and academic historians. In our state, local history is national history. We not only educate Americans about the Revolution and the industrial revolution, we tell the stories and safeguard ancestral records of a significant percentage of American families. We work to put history on the map in the Commonwealth. Together our efforts can be more successful in preservation, outreach, and educating our visitors and participants about the complex economic, social, political, and cultural issues that dominated our past and shape our present. The conference is widely celebrated as the best networking and skill-sharing opportunity for historians of our state culture.
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Henriette Lazaridis, author of The Clover House, will explore immigration-related themes of exile and nostalgia, belonging, and identity from the perspective of a modern Greek-American family. Reflecting on every immigrant's rite of passage in becoming part of a new country.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: anuncio@7gables.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, June 18, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour around the Jamaica Pond. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston’s elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond’s shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tour last 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Monday, June 20, 2016 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
A family-favorite tradition returns! Fitchburg-made Iver Johnson bicycles are on display, in one of the largest displays ever, within one mile of the factory where they were created. The Iver Johnson company made some of the most highly regarded racing and pleasure bikes in America, from the 1890’s till World War II. They were shipped from Fitchburg to Iver Johnson sporting goods stores all over the world. These historic bikes have been loaned by local collectors and restoration experts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 AM to 4 PM and Wednesdays 10 AM to 6 PM.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Reporting from the West Wing briefing room since 2008, Paul Brandus—the most followed White House journalist on Twitter (@WestWingReport)—weaves together stories of the presidents, their families, the events of their time—and an oft-ignored major character, the White House itself. From George Washington—who selected the winning design for the White House—to the current occupant, Barack Obama—the story of the White House is the story of America itself. Through triumph and tragedy, boom and bust, secrets and scandals, Brandus takes you to the presidential bedroom, movie theater, Situation Room, Oval Office and more. "Under This Roof" is a “sensuous account of the history of both the home of the President, and the men and women who designed, inhabited, and decorated it."
Tuesday, June 21, 2016 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Session 3 of a Common Good Reads discussion series that will cover texts that ask participants to consider the relationship between diversity, culture, migration, and the social contract.
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
When the House of the Seven Gables opened as a museum in 1910, Caroline Emmerton recognized this importance of Nathaniel Hawthorne's literary fame in attracting visitors to the site. The tradition continues with author Mark Beauregard who will discuss his new novel, The Whale: A Love Story, which explores the intense relationship between Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville and their surprising influence on each other's work. Hawthorne and Melville were neighbors while Hawthorne was writing The House of the Seven Gables and Melville was finishing Moby-Dick: their passionate friendship shaped their work and changed American literature. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, June 23, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
The Essex—the famous shipwreck that inspired Moby Dick—and its aftermath is a captivating story of a ship’s crew battered by whale attack, broken by four months at sea, and forced—out of necessity—to make meals of their fellow survivors. Dowling delves into the ordeal’s submerged history—the survivors’ lives, ambitions and motives, their pivotal actions during the desperate moments of the wreck itself, and their will to reconcile those actions and their consequences.
Saturday, June 25, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South Street, Jamaica Plain 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
At the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation. Responsible for orchestrating the American push into the continent was President Thomas Jefferson. He most famously recruited Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, who led the Corps of Discovery to the Pacific, but at the same time there were other teams who did the same work, in places where it was even more crucial.
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Session 4 of a Common Good Reads discussion series that will cover texts that ask participants to consider the relationship between diversity, culture, migration, and the social contract.
Saturday, July 2, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The district includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Tuesday, July 5, 2016 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Session 5 of a Common Good Reads discussion series that will cover texts that ask participants to consider the relationship between diversity, culture, migration, and the social contract.
Saturday, July 9, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today’s Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, July 16, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Wednesday, July 20, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
This groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book—until now. In Romantic Outlaws,Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein—two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy. In 1797, less than two weeks after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died, and a remarkable life spent pushing against the boundaries of society’s expectations for women came to an end. But another was just beginning. Wollstonecraft’s daughter Mary was to follow a similarly audacious path.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. University of Massachusetts Professor Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.
Saturday, July 30, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to tour this neighborhood developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tour lasts between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Saturday, August 6, 2016 11:00AM12:30 PM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour around the Jamaica Pond. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston’s elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond’s shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. All tours are free to the public and are offered on dates shown. Tour last 90 minutes and is canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Thursday, August 11, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Ken Turino will explore the life and work of William Sumner Appleton, founder of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities now Historic New England. Using examples from New England historic sites including Caroline Emerton and The House of the Seven Gables, the presentation will illustrate Appleton's numerous contributions to the evolution of the historic preservation movement during the first half of the twentieth century. The presentation will also look at the history of the preservation movement in America as well as Appleton's legacy and influence on modern preservation efforts. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, August 13, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South St, JP 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, August 13, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country’s first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burial Ground. Free, just meet your guide at the starting location. Tours last 60 minutes and are cancelled in the case of heavy rain.
  • Loring-Greenough House, 12 South St, JP 02130
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, August 20, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. The district includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 27, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today’s Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, September 3, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston’s first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a “worker’s utopia” for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours is on our website.
Saturday, September 10, 2016 11:00AM
Walk along Green Street with the Jamaica Plain Historical Society. Laid out in 1836, the street played a key role in Jamaica Plain’s development, functioning as a residential, commercial, and transportation conduit in the lives of the district’s residents. Although Green Street was subdivided as early as 1851 for stores, factories and houses, it was not extensively developed until the late 1870s with construction continuing until the early 1900s. The Bowditch School was completed in 1892, and early in the 20th century the United States Post Office moved from its location on Call Street at Woolsey Square to its new location at the corner of Green and Cheshire Streets. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map with the starting point is on our website.
Thursday, September 15, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Alexandra Pi?eros Shields, Ph.D., Executive Director, Essex County Community Organization, will give an overview of the political and economic dynamics that have shaped U.S immigration policy and affected immigrants from Latin America. Her talk, Framing the Immigration Debate will highlight lessons for our current immigration policy challenges. Refreshments will be served.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x105
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: anuncio@7gables.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, September 17, 2016 11:00AM
Join the JP Historical Society to tour this neighborhood developed from 19th-century summer estates into a model suburban enclave. It contains examples representative of New England architecture with designs by local architects and builders. It also contains an unusual garden city model housing development by the Boston Dwelling House Company which was founded in 1912. Tour lasts between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Dance, theatre, and pageantry played an important role at the House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association in the days of Caroline Emmerton. Join Anjali Mitter Duva, author of the historical novel "Faint Promise of Rain" for a journey to 16th century Rajasthan, India. Based on her travels to that desert region and on her study of kathak dance, a classical storytelling art that blends both Hindu and Muslim traditions and aesthetics, Anjali will tell the story of this classical art form as it traveled through India's tumultuous history, mirroring the region's own story as the dance was performed by Hindu temple women, then Muslim courtesans, then residents of red light districts, and finally by artists on the international stage. Anjali will include a short kathak dance demonstration, and books will be available for sale and signing. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email or call.
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7; free for members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.
Saturday, September 24, 2016 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour around the Jamaica Pond. Once a district that only included the houses of Boston’s elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley who made their homes on the Pond’s shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. Tour lasts 90 minutes and will be canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. A map showing the starting points of the walking tours can be found on our website.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
In the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they didn't turn to male graduates. Rather, they recruited an elite group of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible. For the first time, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women--known as "human computers"--who broke the boundaries of both gender and science.
Saturday, October 8, 2016 3:00 PM4:00 PM
Between 1911 and 1922, a series of wars would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states, in which the central conflict, of course, is World War I—a story we think we know well. As Sean McMeekin shows us in this revelatory new history of what he calls the “wars of the Ottoman succession,” we know far less than we think. The Ottoman Endgame brings to light the entire strategic narrative that led to an unstable new order in postwar Middle East—much of which is still felt today. McMeekin also brilliantly reconceives our inherited Anglo-French understanding of the war’s outcome and the collapse of the empire that followed.
Sunday, November 6, 2016 6:30 PM
Join Mass Humanities in conferring the Governor's Award upon three exemplary honorees whose public actions have been grounded in an appreciation of the humanities and have enhanced civic life in the Commonwealth. The honorees: Frieda Garcia, Atul Gawande, or Lia Poorvu. Reception begins at 6:30 PM, followed by dinner and The Governor's Awards in the Humanities Presentations at 7:15PM.
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 6:00 PMFriday, November 16, 2018 8:00 PM
In 1768, precisely one hundred years after the House of the Gables was built, craftsmen had likely completed the final decorative embellishments of a new mansion erected across the harbor in Marblehead. Exquisite carvings, mahogany paneling, and magnificent hand-painted murals gave the grand new residence an aura of splendor that would have rivaled most New England homes at that time, just as the Turners' impressive dwelling would have a century earlier. Join former Lee Mansion curator Judy Anderson for an illustrated talk about the preservation of the splendid house and its hand painted wallpapers over two and a half centuries. A book about those wall-coverings will be for sale after the talk. To reserve your spot for this lecture please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 104
  • House of the Seven Gables, 115 Derby Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 744-0991 x104
  • web: www.7gables.org
  • email: groups@7gables.org
  • cost: $7, free for members.
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Saturday, February 27, 2016 Sunday, February 12, 2017
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts explores through more than 20 objects how nature has inspired, impressed, and enlightened society long before the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859. Using three themes, the exhibition explores the subject of flora and how it inspired the decorative arts. “Botanizing” looks at the movement to classify, study, and teach though a selection of educational books and prints detailing floral anatomy and stages of life. “Art in Nature” delves into the museum’s rich collection of decorative arts to see how plants and flowers have influenced designers and craftspeople in fields as diverse as textiles, ceramics, furniture, and architecture. Finally, “Bringing the Outdoors In” showcases ceramic and glass vessels which literally brought colorful and fragrant flowers and plants indoors for personal enjoyment and study.
Monday, April 4, 2016 10:00 AMWednesday, May 25, 2016 6:00 PM
A new exhibition on doctors, nurses, hospitals and medicine in Fitchburg. Fitchburg’s Burbank Hospital was a center for innovations in public health; while generations of nurses trained in Fitchburg’s modern facilities. This exhibition is supported by a grant from the George R. Wallace Foundation.
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 11:00 AMSaturday, November 19, 2016 4:00 PM
The Nichols family (who resided in what is now the museum from 1885-1960) was an upper middle class, Progressive-era (1890-1920) family with three intelligent, driven, and very different daughters who were involved in many reform activities of the day, including: women's suffrage, pacifism, and civil service reform. On May 4, the museum will open an exhibition that delves into the social and political activities of this innovative family, focusing especially on the advocacy of the younger generation of the three Nichols sisters, Rose, Marian and Margaret. We hope that by telling the stories of the past alongside the stories of the present, audiences will be inspired to engage in critical thinking about the role of women in public policy and politics.
  • Nichols House Museum, 55 Mount Vernon Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: (617) 227-6993
  • web: www.nicholshousemuseum.org/
  • cost: Free with museum admission. Adults: $10, Children 12 and under: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, May 28, 2016 10:00 AMSunday, October 30, 2016 5:00 PM
Travel with Raven to the Northwest Coast and experience the rich heritage of the Native peoples, portrayed in dramatic storytelling and striking art objects. Fantastic tales set in the oceans, streams, and forests of the Pacific Northwest are accompanied by totem poles, carved masks, and other ceremonial and utilitarian objects reflecting the traditions and artistry of the Kwakiutl, Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit groups, among others. The exhibit features objects from the collection of Joan and Paul Gluck, one of the finest private collections of Pacific Northwest coastal art.
  • Berkshire Museum, 39 South Street (Route 7)
  • Pittsfield, Berkshire County, MA (Berkshire)
  • contact: (413)443-7171
  • web: berkshiremuseum.org
  • email: info@berkshiremuseum.org
  • cost: Regular museum admission: $13 adult; $6 child (under 18), Museum members & children 3 and under free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Monday, June 20, 2016 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
A family-favorite tradition returns! Fitchburg-made Iver Johnson bicycles are on display, in one of the largest displays ever, within one mile of the factory where they were created. The Iver Johnson company made some of the most highly regarded racing and pleasure bikes in America, from the 1890’s till World War II. They were shipped from Fitchburg to Iver Johnson sporting goods stores all over the world. These historic bikes have been loaned by local collectors and restoration experts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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