Events

Monday, June 18, 2018 6:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Pulitzer Prize-winning author and presidential historian JON MEACHAM for a discussion of his latest book, "The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels." Our current climate of partisan fury is not new, and in "The Soul of America" Meacham shows us how what Abraham Lincoln called the "better angels of our nature" have repeatedly won the day. Painting surprising portraits of Lincoln and other presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, and Lyndon B. Johnson, and illuminating the courage of such influential citizen activists as Martin Luther King, Jr., early suffragettes Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt, civil rights pioneers Rosa Parks and John Lewis, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and Army-McCarthy hearings lawyer Joseph N. Welch, Meacham brings vividly to life turning points in American history.
Thursday, June 21, 2018 12:00 PM1:00 PM
Join us for an author talk with Patricia Harris and David Lyon, authors of the new book "Historic New England: A Tour of the Region's Top 100 National Landmarks." The talk will focus on some of the most interesting historic destinations in New England. Authors Patricia Harris and David Lyon have traveled and written together for decades and are the authors of more than thirty books about travel, food, and art.
Thursday, June 21, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
In Puritan and Colonial times, until land-filling started in 1796, Boston was a peninsula running north-south in Boston harbor. It was surrounded on the west by the large estuary of the Charles River, Back Bay, and on the east by the smaller estuary of the Neponset River, Front Bay. "Crossing the Peninsula," a distance of 9/10th of a mile, you will see Boston evolve over its almost 400 year history. Witness as the cows are banished from Boston Common; as the hills are shorn of fifty or sixty feet to build Charles Street and the North End; as Boston invents and secures its water supply; as graves and the subway are dug; as government and its buildings spring up; as smallpox is conquered and Boston becomes a medical center; and as the town is finally cleaned of 170 years of accumulated filth.
Thursday, June 21, 2018 5:30 PM6:30 PM
Barbara Suchocki's book is short, but gets to the heart of what having meaningful work and losing that work means for an individual and community. Barbara will be there to talk more about her experience, and everyone is welcome to share similar or different experiences, ask questions, talk about what her story means to you, or just listen. You can get Barbara's book by volunteering for 3 hours at the Chair City Community Workshop or donating $50 to the project. You can also sit and read it during open hours at the Heywood Memorial Library in the local history room or in the Chair City Community Workshop. The Chair City Community Workshop is a community space where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books.
Thursday, June 21, 2018 7:00 PM
A discussion of the life of 17 year-old Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (later Shelley) who, attending a dinner party hosted by Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and others, accepted a challenge to create a legendary character. Because of that contest, she wrote her epic work "Frankenstein". 2018 is the 200th anniversary of this creation.
Saturday, June 23, 2018 1:00 PM5:00 PM
Juneteenth is a State holiday commemorating African American Freedom and Achievement. The Lynn Juneteenth Festival will be an afternoon of musical performances, presentations, art, speeches, poetry and fun for all ages. This will be a true community celebration of Freedom! All are Welcome!
Saturday, June 23, 2018 11:00AM
Once a district that only included the houses of Boston's elite, the Pond later was put to industrial use as tons of ice were harvested there each winter. Learn about the movers and shakers such as Francis Parkman and James Michael Curley, who made their homes on the Pond's shores. Discover how the Pond was transformed from private estates and warehouses into the parkland we know today. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed. Additional tours available 8/11 and 9/29.
Sunday, June 24, 2018 2:00 PM3:30 PM
The Kendall Square area has exploded with new development and is one of the hottest commercial real estate markets in the country. A center for innovation, it boasts offices for Google, Akamai, Biogen, Microsoft, Facebook, and more. This recent boom has been accompanied by the construction of new living spaces, restaurants, and hotels. In the early 20th century, Kendall Square was home to distilleries, electric power plants, soap and hosiery factories, and the Kendall Boiler and Tank Company. It remained MIT's industrial backyard after it arrived in 1916. Once planned to be the home of NASA's Electronics Research Center, Kendall Square was a ghost town by the 1980s. Today, it boasts a thriving live/work/play environment that is integrated with its academic neighbor and home to many startups. Meet your guide in the plaza next to the outbound entrance to the Kendall/MIT MBTA station on the Red Line.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome award-winning author, sociologist, and Rutgers professor ARLENE STEIN for a discussion of her latest book, "Unbound: Transgender Men and the Remaking of Identity." Stein takes us into the lives of four strangers who find themselves together in a sun-drenched surgeon's office, having traveled to Florida from across the United States in order to masculinize their chests. Ben, Lucas, Parker, and Nadia wish to feel more comfortable in their bodies; three of them are also taking testosterone so that others recognize them as male. Following them over the course of a year, Stein shows how members of this young transgender generation, along with other gender dissidents, are refashioning their identities and challenging others' conceptions of who they are.
Tuesday, June 26, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
Essex Heritage is proud to present long-time Salem News and Lynn Item reporter Tom Dalton for a talk about his recent book on the Lynn years of Frederick Douglass. The book, titled, "Frederick Douglass: The Lynn Years (1841-1848)," is based largely on letters and newspaper articles from the 1840s. It follows Douglass from his arrival in Lynn as an unknown 23-year-old fugitive slave to his departure more than six years later as one of the best known abolitionists and orators in the country and abroad.
  • Hawthorne Hotel, 18 Washington Square W
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • web: bit.ly/2sSBiqx
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, June 27, 2018 5:00 PM9:00 PM
Select artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers. These artifacts, and their research papers, will be on display during our Open House event. Guests will be able to carefully handle and closely view these artifacts from the Society's collections.
  • Tapley Memorial Hall, 13 Page Street
  • Danvers, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 777-1666
  • web: www.danvershistory.org
  • email: DHS@DANVERSHISTORY.ORG
  • cost: donations gratefully accepted for educational programming
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, June 27, 2018 5:00 PM6:00 PM
Enjoy summer afternoons on the Terrace listening to professional actors read short stories written by Wharton and her contemporaries including Henry James, Edgar Allen Poe, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Wednesdays, June 27th - August 29th at 5:00 PM (except for July 4th).
Thursday, June 28, 2018 4:00 PM5:00 PM
Award-winning interior designer and decorative arts historian Thomas Jayne discusses Edith Wharton and Ogden Codman's 1897 book The Decoration of Houses, and the art of classical simplicity and balance in interior design.
Sunday, July 1, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us for a literary celebration! Jeffrey Lawrence of Rutgers University will lead a discussion of Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener", followed by a fiction and poetry reading given by our five new writers-in-residence.
Sunday, July 1, 2018 4:00 PM5:30 PM
Citizens of Brockton will read "What to the Slave is the 4th of July" out loud in the Douglass Community Garden in the language of their ancestors to honor our city's diversity. As part of the traditional reading, we have volunteers who will read each paragraph, representing twelve different languages. After the reading, we will enjoy a community conversation and social to discuss how the themes of the speech and Mr. Douglass's life resonate today.
Monday, July 2, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Join the New Bedford Historical Society for a community reading of "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July". Douglass's powerful speech, given in 1852, asks important questions about racial justice our society is still wrestling with today.
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 6:00 PM
Join us for our 8th annual reading of the Mass Humanities Program "Reading Frederick Douglass" at the beautiful High Rock Tower Park. All the usual favorites that make up this highly anticipated Community Event over the July 4th weekend are in place; the local musical and dance acts, local food vendors and pony rides are on board and ready for action! Per usual, we are delighted to offer this event free of charge.
  • High Rock Tower Park, 30 Circuit Ave
  • Lynn, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • email: wendy_joseph@mac.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Professor Meredith McGill of Rutgers University will discuss the work of Berkshire writers and activists Catherine Maria Sedgwick and Fanny Kemble, bookended by an introduction and discussion facilitated by Jeffrey Lawrence.
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:00 PM
Mass Humanities' signature communal reading of Frederick Douglass's speech in which he took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:00 PM
Worcester Roots Project will collaborate with Music Mania Television to produce the annual reading of Douglass's speech, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" to commemorate his bicentennial.
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:00 PM
The Friends of Edgartown Library is sponsoring the annual communal reading of Frederick Douglass's speech, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?"
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 4:30PM5:30PM
Renaissance House, a retreat for writers and Off Center Theatre, will be producing Frederick Douglass's famous speech, "What To The Slave Is The 4th of July?" The audience is invited to participate.
  • Inkwell Beach
  • Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: 917-747-0367
  • email: Offcentrtheatre@aol.com
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for the third annual community reading and discussion of the Declaration of Independence and abolitionist Frederick Douglass's 1852 Fourth of July speech in response, challenging Americans to live up to our founding principles. We will read the documents aloud, taking turns, and then we'll talk.
  • Shaw Memorial Library Pavilion (behind Library) 312 Main Street
  • Plainfield, Hampshire County, MA (CT Valley)
  • email: plainfieldmareads@gmail.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Celebrate the 4th of July at Lexington Historical Society with a performance by the Lexington Historical Society Colonial Singers, The Declaration of Independence and the Lexington Declaration, read by local costumed reenactors, a response from Colonel Francis Smith of His Majesty's Army, and ice cream.
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Considered one of the most daring, eloquent speeches in the English language, Frederick Douglass's fiery 1852 speech, "What to the Slave is the 4th of July" challenges its audience, then and now, to consider the meaning of freedom, citizenship, and patriotism. This event begins with a dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence by Minute Man National Historic Park re-enactor Jim Hollister to set the background for Douglass's speech, followed by a participatory community reading of the speech accompanied by costumed readers representing different eras of civil rights activism, including 1860s Civil Rights activist and Robbins House resident Ellen Garrison; the 1960s Civil Rights movement; 1970s Black Power movement; and the current Black Lives Matter movement. The event ends with a moderated audience discussion with historians.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 9:00 AM
"Parlez-vous francais?" Come enjoy coffee, croissants, and some French conversation on the Terrace Thursday mornings (July 5- August 30) at 9 AM in honor of Edith Wharton's love affair with France! Reservations are required and must be made at least 24 hours in advance.
Thursday, July 5, 2018 5:30 PM7:30 PM
On July 5, 1852, abolitionist Frederick Douglass spoke in Rochester, New York about the hypocrisy of a nation celebrating its freedom when millions of its people were bound by slavery. Through his speech, Douglass held up a mirror to the nation's values, emphasizing the cruel irony of the independence day celebration. The injustice that still simmers in our country makes the Frederick Douglass speech as relevant today as it was in 1852. The Social Justice Committee of Unitarian Universalist Society of Grafton & Upton has organized local nonprofits to gather people of all backgrounds and ages on Grafton Common to experience the moving words of Frederick Douglass's famous speech, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" The reading of the speech will be followed by a discussion led by Donna Maria Cameron. Those attending the event are encouraged to bring a picnic. Event organizers will provide lemonade, water, and desserts.
Friday, July 6, 2018 5:00 PM8:00 PM
Join us on the Terrace every weekend in July and August from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. for lively evenings of free music played by the region's most talented musicians.
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In celebration of the 150th birthday of Berkshire County native W. E. B. Du Bois, Professor Neil Roberts of Williams University will give a talk on Du Bois's writings and Berkshire legacy, bookended by an introduction and discussion facilitated by Jeffrey Lawrence.
Tuesday, July 10, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Boston By Foot partners with the BWHT to give a tour that roams around historic Beacon Hill and introduces you to a variety of notable women who lived and worked in this neighborhood. We will talk about abolitionists, suffragists, artists, nurses, lawyers, educational advocates and authors who not only changed our city, but made important strides for our country, and in some cases for the world. Come along to learn about women who opened new paths. As Abigail Adams so notably wrote to her husband, we must always "Remember The Ladies."
Thursday, July 12, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join Dr. Irene Goldman-Price as she examines evidence of Edith Wharton's prejudices gleaned from Wharton's writings, setting it within the context of her life and times, and probing its implications.
Thursday, July 12, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
In conjunction with its exhibition of historic neon signs from Massachusetts businesses, The Greenway Conservancy will hold a free panel discussion about light, and art, and livable cities. Architectural historian and GLOW consultant Victoria Solan will engage in dialogue with contemporary practitioners, such as historians, staff of the Neon Museum in Las Vegas and contemporary artists who work with other forms of light.
Thursday, July 12, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store and WBUR welcome writer and musician DAN KAUFMAN for a discussion of his new book, "The Fall of Wisconsin: The Conservative Conquest of a Progressive Bastion and the Future of American Politics." Wisconsin has been known nationwide for its progressive ideas and government, famously serving as a "laboratory of democracy," a cradle of the labor and environmental movements, and birthplace of the Wisconsin Idea, which championed expertise in the service of the common good. But following a Republican sweep of the state's government in 2010, Wisconsin's political heritage was overturned, and the state went Republican for the first time in three decades in the 2016 presidential election, elevating Donald J. Trump to the presidency. The Fall of Wisconsin is a deeply reported, searing account of how the state's progressive tradition was undone and turned into a model for national conservatives bent on remaking the country.
Friday, July 13, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Friday, July 13, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome award-winning historian, journalist, and playwright JEFF BIGGERS for a discussion of his latest book, "Resistance: Reclaiming an American Tradition." In an inspiring narrative history, Jeff Biggers reframes today’s battles against the most authoritarian White House policies in recent memory as a continuum of a vibrant American tradition. "Resistance" is a chronicle of the courageous resistance movements that have insured the benchmarks of our democracy--movements that served on the front lines of the American Revolution, the defense of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the defeat of fascism during World War II, and landmark civil rights and environmental protection achievements.
Friday, July 20, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Friday, July 20, 2018 8:00 PM
Join us for a performance of "The Burials", followed by panel discussions and Q&As around school violence with an emphasis upon: the role of public education, the context of security, debates over the second amendment, and the role of police in schools. Panelists will include the chair of the Newburyport Human Rights Commission, leadership from the Newburyport High School, and city law enforcement.
  • Firehouse Center for the Arts, 1 Market Square
  • Newburyport, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-462-7336
  • web: www.firehouse.org/
  • email: boxoffice@firehouse.org
  • cost: See http://www.firehouse.org/ for ticket costs as the events near
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Friday, July 20, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome award-winning journalist and Brown University lecturer ELIZABETH RUSH for a discussion of her latest book, "Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore." We live in a time of unprecedented hurricanes and catastrophic weather events, a time when it is increasingly clear that climate change is neither imagined nor distant--and that rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States in irrevocable ways. In this highly original work of lyrical reportage, Rush guides readers through some of the places where this change has been most dramatic, from the Gulf Coast to Miami, and from New York City to the Bay Area. For many of the plants, animals, and humans in these places, the options are stark: retreat or perish in place.
Saturday, July 21, 2018 10:00 AMSunday, July 22, 2018 5:00 PM
This free, family-friendly festival features art, crafts and other ethically made cultural works created by Indigenous artists from dozens of countries. Enjoy demonstrations by artists and a one-of-a-kind opportunity to exchange, connect, and build community. Chat with Indigenous artists about their crafts and bring home a beautiful memento of your local trip around the world. Cultural Survival is a non-profit organization based in Cambridge, MA, whose mission is to advocate for the rights of Indigenous Peoples.
Saturday, July 21, 2018 2:00 PM
A discussion of modern piracy in the world, and how women as much as men are involved in piracy today.
Saturday, July 21, 2018 3:00 PM
Join us for a performance of "The Burials", followed by panel discussions and Q&As around school violence with an emphasis upon: the role of public education, the context of security, debates over the second amendment, and the role of police in schools. Panelists will include the chair of the Newburyport Human Rights Commission, leadership from the Newburyport High School, and city law enforcement.
  • Firehouse Center for the Arts, 1 Market Square
  • Newburyport, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-462-7336
  • web: www.firehouse.org/
  • email: boxoffice@firehouse.org
  • cost: See http://www.firehouse.org/ for ticket costs as the events near
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, July 21, 2018 8:00 PM
Join us for a performance of "The Burials", followed by panel discussions and Q&As around school violence with an emphasis upon: the role of public education, the context of security, debates over the second amendment, and the role of police in schools. Panelists will include the chair of the Newburyport Human Rights Commission, leadership from the Newburyport High School, and city law enforcement.
  • Firehouse Center for the Arts, 1 Market Square
  • Newburyport, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-462-7336
  • web: www.firehouse.org/
  • email: boxoffice@firehouse.org
  • cost: See http://www.firehouse.org/ for ticket costs as the events near
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, July 22, 2018 3:00 PM
Join us for a performance of "The Burials", followed by panel discussions and Q&As around school violence with an emphasis upon: the role of public education, the context of security, debates over the second amendment, and the role of police in schools. Panelists will include the chair of the Newburyport Human Rights Commission, leadership from the Newburyport High School, and city law enforcement.
  • Firehouse Center for the Arts, 1 Market Square
  • Newburyport, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: 978-462-7336
  • web: www.firehouse.org/
  • email: boxoffice@firehouse.org
  • cost: See http://www.firehouse.org/ for ticket costs as the events near
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, July 24, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
At our final Tuesday on the Terrace, award-winning poet and professor Jaswinder Bolina will give a poetry reading and a discussion of his work as the founder of Write the Power, an online social justice community - bookended by an introduction and discussion facilitated by Jeffrey Lawrence.
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store welcomes acclaimed historian and artist NELL PAINTER for a discussion of her latest book, "Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over." Following her retirement from Princeton University, celebrated historian Dr. Nell Irvin Painter surprised everyone in her life by returning to school--in her sixties--to earn a BFA and MFA in painting. In Old in Art School, she travels from her beloved Newark to the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design; finds meaning in the artists she loves, even as she comes to understand how they may be undervalued; and struggles with the unstable balance between the pursuit of art and the inevitable, sometimes painful demands of a life fully lived.
Friday, July 27, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join us for an intimate conversation between Kate and Pamela Paul, author of "My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues" and editor of The New York Times Book Review.
Friday, July 27, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Wednesday, August 1, 2018 7:00 PM
A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist examines the life and times of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, arguing she left behind the Kennedy family's most profound political legacy.
Thursday, August 2, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Prize-winning author and educator Martin Puchner will discuss his research, career and best-selling book, The Written World. Puchner is the Byron and Anita Wien Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Harvard University.
Friday, August 3, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Friday, August 3, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
In 1882, Wilde embarked on his famous Lecture Tour of North America. In this talk, Richard Guy Wilson examines the nature of these lectures and if Wilde's ideas are incorporated in Wharton's The Decoration of Houses.
Wednesday, August 8, 2018 7:00 PM
A discussion about the women's suffrage movement in the United States and the political gains made up to the present day.
Thursday, August 9, 2018 6:00 PM7:00 PM
Join Rebecca Soffer, coauthor of "Modern Loss: Candid Conversation About Grief. Beginners Welcome." and a lineup of local Berkshire writers for an evening of community and provocative storytelling about grief: the good, the bad, the ugly, and the hilarious.
Friday, August 10, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Friday, August 17, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Porochista Khakpour, author of "Brain on Fire" and "Darkness Visible," will discuss her career, work and forthcoming memoir "Sick" with cultural critic Kate Bolick.
Friday, August 17, 2018 10:30 AM12:00 PM
This 6-week book discussion will bring children 6-10 and adults together to enjoy outstanding and thought-provoking picture books on the topic of immigration. Each participating family will get a copy of the book to keep. Each session will include a book reading and discussion, snack, and art project. Families are encouraged to attend all 6 sessions, as each week will build upon the previous week. Registration is appreciated.
Friday, August 31, 2018
To honor the Bicentennial Celebration, the Frederick Douglass Neighborhood Assocation has created a traveling exhibit that tells the amazing story of Frederick Douglass and connects him to the diversity of Brockton today. Original pieces by Brockton artists highlight the connection of Douglass to Haiti, Cape Verde, Ireland, women and veterans. The display will be in the Main Post Office in Brockton in March and April, and in August will travel to the Main Branch of the Brockton Public Library.
Wednesday, September 5, 2018 4:00 PM5:00 PM
Heidi Pitlor, editor of The Best American Short Stories, will delve deep into the life of Geraldine Brooks, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "People of the Book and The Secret Chord." Proudly sponsored by Canyon Ranch Lenox.
Tuesday, September 11, 2018 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
Friday, September 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Come to one of the best preserved and renowned GAR halls to hear Robert Foster's lecture on the Confederate Flag: 'Symbol of Hate, not Heritage'. The author of the book 'Blue is just a Word' is vice president of Lynn Massachusetts' General Lander Civil War Roundtable, a lifetime member of The Lincoln Forum of Gettysburg, The Lincoln Group of Boston and past session musician for a major record label in London, England.
Saturday, September 15, 2018 7:00 PM9:00 PM
As part of the 200th anniversary of the life of Frederick Douglass, author Nzadi Keita will read from "Brief Evidence of Heaven," a book of persona poems that give voice to Anna Douglass's life and times as she supported her family and her husband. Nzadi will pay homage to the woman who worked as an advocate and abolitionist in her own right.
Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Come join the Citizens of Massachusetts to protest the Fugitive Slave Law. Taken from the Lynn and Boston newspapers of the time, we will re-enact reactions 'from the record' of our past citizens. Speakers include local politicians, social justice activists, educators and writers.
Wednesday, September 19, 2018 7:00 PM
When the paper mill in Groveton, NH closed after being the economic engine of the community for decades, the town fell on hard times. This discussion will focus on what became of the town, how women fought for equal pay and benefits, and how the factory's closing impacted the family unit.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Artifacts come to life through the eyes of volunteer researchers with audience participation in a moderated discussion. Participants will be able to carefully handle and closely view 4 to 6 objects from the Society's collections.
Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
A discussion of five remarkable women, including Amelia Earhart, who fought against entrenched prejudice for the chance to race planes alongside men.
Sunday, September 23, 2018 5:30 PM7:30 PM
Historic re-enactor, Jessa Piaia, will present a one-person interpretation of pioneer aviatrix Amelia Earhart entitled "Meet Amelia Earhart (1897-1937): First Lady of the Air". The program is set in 1936, when Earhart was a popular speaker on the national circuit and preparing for take-off for the around-the-world flight in 1937. Clad in basic aviator gear and bearing a striking resemblance to the subject of her character portrayal, Ms. Piaia uses drama to reveal the accomplishments, struggles, and contributions of women to American history.
Thursday, September 27, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
"Forged in Crisis", by celebrated Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn, spotlights five masters of crisis: polar explorer Ernest Shackleton; President Abraham Lincoln; legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson. What do such disparate figures have in common? Why do their extraordinary stories continue to amaze and inspire? In delivering the answers to those questions, Nancy Koehn offers a remarkable template by which to judge those in our own time to whom the public has given its trust.
Friday, September 28, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
On September 28 1841, Frederick Douglass was forcibly ejected from Eastern Railroad train for refusal to ride in the "Jim Crow" car. Having purchased a first-class ticket he sat beside his friend James Buffum (a future Mayor of Lynn) on their way to an Abolitionist event. The conductor engaged some roughs to get Douglass out of his seat, but that did not happen until Douglass was thrown to the sidewalk, taking that train bench with him! Come watch our re-enactment of this early progenitor of the non-violent protest movement!
Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM3:30 PM
This is the story of how America's first women soldiers helped win World War I, earned the vote, and fought the U.S. Army for the veterans' benefits they had earned.
Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:00 AM1:00 PM
Come spend a beautiful Autumn morning for this special tour of abolitionist graves and storytelling by Scholar Julia Greene.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:30 PM9:00 PM
Known widely as a simple and courageous mother figure, in fact Harriet Tubman was an intelligent, crafty, fearless visionary who transcended assumptions about black women's abilities, leading scores of enslaved people to freedom. Author of the first adult biography of Tubman, historian Kate Clifford Larson will share new Tubman scholarship and describe recent public history initiatives related to her life and role in the Underground Railroad. Copies of Bound for the Promised Land will be available for purchase and signing.
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.royallhouse.org
  • email: director@royallhouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; general admission $10.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Colonel Earl "The Pearl" Wederbrook, USMC (Ret) on a short trip through time to compare and contrast the occupation of Boston in 1776 with Berlin in 1945 and Baghdad in 2004. Col. Wederbrook will discuss and analyze the military, political, economic, social and moral aspects and consequences of using the military to quell civil unrest, occupy conquered territory or aid in nation building. Afterwards, join us for a reception and conversation with Col. Wederbrook, a representative of the Office of Veterans Services, and several veterans from post-9/11 deployments for an intimate discussion on what it's like being the occupier in a foreign land and how to adapt to civilian life upon return home.
Saturday, November 3, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
The morning of November 25th, 1856, Mary Chipman Lawrence set sail aboard the whaling ship Addison bound for the Pacific on a voyage that would last three and a half years. In this performance, Mary will bring forth from her meticulously kept journal, the joys and tribulations of life at sea with her husband, Captain Samuel Lawrence, and their daughter Minnie. The sights and sounds of foreign ports and their inhabitants, the sailors' sea shanties, the surprisingly robust social life amongst whaling ships, and the challenging everyday details, all will come to life as Mary takes you on a journey so real, you'll feel the pitch of the ship and the spray over the rails. Come join us as re-enactor Anne Barrett takes you through the adventures of Mary Chipman Lawrence!
Monday, November 26, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
A fun art event where youth will paint or draw what signifies an African family. Artwork will be displayed and the jury will choose winners using criteria like most detailed, color theme, use of space, and creativeness. Fun art activities for all ages available. Come one, come all, and let's dive into the fine art imagination with Abel!
Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In the shadow of the Holocaust, what is the world's continuing responsibility to prevent genocide and mass atrocity crimes and hold accountable those who commit them? In recent decades genocide and mass atrocities have been committed in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, Darfur, Libya and Syria, among other places. The world stood by and did nothing in several of these situations, but intervened in others under the UN doctrine of responsibility to protect. Today, nationalism and authoritarianism are on the rise, the US has withdrawn from human rights leadership, and support for implementing the responsibility to protect has diminished in the UN. John Shattuck is a former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor who participated in the successful international effort to end the genocidal war in Bosnia, and helped establish the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.
Saturday, April 7, 2018 10:00 AMSaturday, October 13, 2018 2:00 PM
Tapping into History features Greenfield Tap & Die, Lunt Silversmiths, and D. B. Kellogg's Grocery Store, uncovers the connections between them, and examines the lives of employers and employees in the early 20th century. Every Friday 10 AM to 2 PM, April 13 to October 29, first and second Saturdays of each month April through October, 10 AM to 2 PM. By appointment year round!

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