Events

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 Sunday, April 30, 2017
Who am I? Where am I? These are the fundamental questions proposed by the humanities. Inquiries related to local history, literature, and education, inspire us to think deeply about the places where we live and how our identity fits into the context of our community and the seasons. Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts is a bimonthly publication produced by Hilltown Families that sheds light on embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts. With these downloadable seasonal itineraries, self-directed teens, lifelong learners, and families are encouraged to engage together in cultural opportunities that support similar interests, resulting in a shared history, strengthening sense of place.
Tuesday, March 28, 2017 7:00PM9:30PM
Challenges to America's most sacred myths fuel the traditions of vernacular humor, which asserts faith in ordinary Americans and mistrust of elites. Spoof presidential campaigns by ostensibly ordinary citizens -- heirs of Brother Jonathan, folklore's quintessential American -- have mocked the ideological contradictions of presidential campaigns whose vernacular values nonetheless yield elite results. Professor Judith Yaross Lee (Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University) will consider how nearly two hundred years of spoof campaigns in cartoon, video, newspaper features, and other formats highlight values and visions always at stake in the presidential race, but especially in the candidacy of Donald Trump. Co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Department of History, and the Bland Fund of the Department of Political Science.
  • 36 Maywood Street, Dana Commons, Second Floor
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: jmcgugan@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 3:00 PM4:00 PM
Paul K. Chappell graduated from West Point in 2002, was deployed to Iraq, and left active duty in 2009. He grew up in Alabama, the son of a half-black and half-white father who fought in the Korean and Vietnam wars, and a Korean mother. Paul now believes in nonviolence, and he is the author of the "Road to Peace" series, a seven-book series about waging peace, ending war, the art of living, and what it means to be human. Chappell serves as the Peace Leadership Director for the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Lecturing across the country and internationally, he also teaches courses and workshops on Peace Leadership.
Thursday, March 30, 2017 Sunday, April 9, 2017
Emilie du Chatelet is best known for her fifteen-year liaison with Voltaire but she was more than a great man's mistress. She was one of the leading interpreters of modern physics during the Age of Enlightenment. In this play Emilie must defend her life by tallying her achievements in Love and Philosophy-and searching for a formula that will convince the world of her worth.
Saturday, April 1, 2017 6:00 PM
Get off the Freedom Trail and explore the darker side of Boston! This original guided walk through misery, misfortune, malevolence and murder is based on true historical events that have occurred in Boston. Fact is often stranger than fiction! As you begin to uncover Boston's dark side, you will hear many dark and disturbing stories not often shared with tourists. Topics include but are certainly not limited to: the dangers of Richmond Street, the vandalization of the Royal Governor's House, the Molasses Flood, body snatchers, and the infamous Brink's Robbery, all against the backdrop of Boston's oldest neighborhood. We hope you will join us for a walk on the Dark Side. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, April 1, 2017
Register your family for the 4 part series of Family Adventures in Reading featuring professional storyteller, Diane Edgecomb. Families with children ages 6-10 will explore and keep 6 great picturebooks over our 4 meetings along with a healthy snack and arts and crafts activity. Sponsored by the Plainville Public Library and held at An Unlikely Story Bookstore, third floor. Please only register if you can attend all 4 Saturdays, April 1, 8 , 22 and 29, 10:30am - 12:00pm. Parking is available in the lot across the intersection from the bookstore.
Saturday, April 1, 2017 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Take your research skills to the next level with this 3 session course presented by Ann Lawthers, genealogist (4/1, 4/8, and 4/15)! With the sheer number of online resources at your fingertips, it's easy to dive in to your family history research without any formal training as a genealogist. Certainly you'll learn along the way, and devise your own methods, but it's also easy to become overwhelmed and form bad habits. Whether you are new to genealogy, want to refresh your skills, or learn best practices, this course will set you on the right path to getting the most out of your family history research. Topics include: how to record your findings, strategies for analyzing records, online research, and more. Each class includes skill-building exercises to help students apply their new found knowledge.
Sunday, April 2, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
A talk by Margaret Bruzelius. Clothes always denote meaning, whether or not the wearer controls or is aware of that meaning. "In its heyday, a hat was the punctuation mark, the final inflection of the sentence that was the outfit for both men and women." Beginning with illustrations derived from 30's screwball comedies, Margaret Bruzelius will discuss the patterns of meaning in hats in film: high crown versus low crown, broad versus narrow brim, feathers and trim, and where and how the hat fits on the head.
Sunday, April 2, 2017 3:00 PM6:00 PM
A discussion that aims to bring our community together around questions surrounding immigration. The forum will be led by acclaimed author Ilan Stavans, with special guest contributors/ responders from Ashfield, the Hilltowns, and the Pioneer Valley. This deep-dive conversation will wonder out loud how a rural hilltown can think, understand and respond to the questions surrounding immigration in these times of change. This is part of a series of events exploring the relationship between culture, community, and democracy, in conjunction with Double Edge's Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair, June 3 & 4. Light refreshments will be served, and further informal conversation (and music by Double Edge) will follow at the Ashfield Lakehouse.
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 11:00 AM3:00 PM
Several UMass Boston students from around the world will speak about their experiences having to leave their homeland and then face the challenges of adjusting to life in the United States. The William Joiner Institute has partnered with teachers from four schools in the Boston area (Boston Tech Academy, Cambridge Rindge and Latin, EMK Health Careers Academy, and Seekonk High School) who will bring students who would like to participate in the symposium. We are hoping the symposium will be a forum where stories of exodus and arrival can be told and heard by a diverse group of faculty and students.
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 7:30 PM10:00 PM
Join us at the performance on Roxbury Community College Night. Susan-Lori Parks' thrilling and darkly comic fable of brotherly love and sibling rivalry. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The New York Times says "Topdog/Underdog considers nothing less than the existential traps of being African American and male in the United States, the masks that wear the men as well as vice versa." Join us after the performance for a post-show panel discussion hosted by Marshall Hughes.
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 5:30 PM8:30 PM
This is the culminating event in Fitchburg State University's spring, 2017, "community read" program. The evening will begin with an informal reception, followed by a more formal talk on his book, "Our Kids," at 7:00 PM. The book explores the growing opportunity gap in America. Dr. Putnam details the stories of families from a range of socioeconomic and racial or ethnic backgrounds in communities across the United States, and he combines these interview-based narratives with analysis of demographic data and research on institutions and social mobility.
  • Fitchburg State University, Hammond Building, Main Lounge (on the first floor)
  • Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (978) 665-3832
  • email: Robert_Putnam@hks.harvard.edu
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 6:00 PM7:30 PM
The birth of America's first subway, Boston's T, would not have been possible if not for the bold thinking of one man and the creative ingenuity of another. The stories of these two men, Henry M. Whitney and Frank J. Sprague, collided in the late 1800s. The result was a dramatic historical moment followed by the first shovel going into the ground to begin construction on America's first subway. Doug Most, author of "The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America's First Subway," chronicles the science of the subway, looks at the centuries of fears people overcame about traveling underground, and tells a story as exciting as any ever ripped from the pages of U.S. history. "The Race Underground" is a great American saga of two rival American cities, their rich, powerful and sometimes corrupt interests, and an invention that changed the lives of millions. Book sales and signing to follow.
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 7:00 PM8:15 PM
Beyond the lasting legacy of Frederick Law Olmsted's individual landscape designs, the Olmsted firm shaped major portions of the urban landscape in cities across the country. Olmsted scholar and landscape historian Arleyn Levee will give a presentation about the impact of three generations of Olmsted landscape design. Levee will explore diverse projects by the creative professionals of the Olmsted firm across the many decades of the firm's practice. In particular, she will focus on selected New England projects-public, institutional or residential-viewing them against the context of the extensive Olmsted work across the country.
  • Rotch-Jones-Duff House Parlors, 396 County Street, 396 County Street parlors
  • New Bedford, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-997-1401
  • web: rjdmuseum.org/calendar/#
  • email: kcorkum@rjdmuseum.org
  • cost: $15 for members; $18 for non-members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, April 6, 2017 12:15 PM2:15 PM
Let us help you share your story! The Berkshire Immigrant Stories Project help participants with the process of digitizing a chosen object, narrating their story, and uploading them to the "Your Story, Our Story" website. This is the last of three workshops this spring. Laptops, scanners, digital cameras provided on site. Food and drink provided. Writing help from BCC Writing Center, Athenaeum Literacy Volunteers, Translator help from BCC students will be available. The workshop is open to all. For more information on participating in the project or volunteering, see contact info below.
Thursday, April 6, 2017 Thursday, April 27, 2017
Participate in a four-session book discussion of Jana Laiz's "Weeping Under This Same Moon." "Weeping" is the three time award winning novel, based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives. The final session is a special presentation by the author. Sessions are Thursdays from 2:30-3:30 PM on April 6, 13, 20, and 27. Books will be made available to participants.
Friday, April 7, 2017 12:00 PM1:00 PM
Part of our First Friday lecture series, Gain a step-by-step look at applying to lineage societies: the application process, tips for when you can't find vital records, and a case example from our research services team.
Sunday, April 9, 2017 1:00 PM
From the Boston Massacre to Paul Revere's midnight ride, Boston is renowned for its inciting events to the American Revolution. Come explore the streets of Boston's oldest neighborhoods and hear the extraordinary stories preserved in the meetinghouses, halls, and homes where the Revolution was born. Our most comprehensive Freedom Trail offering, this tour includes historical landmarks such as King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House, the Old State House, the site of the Boston Massacre, the Paul Revere House and more. Whether you are a history buff or just want a refresher on our nation's Revolutionary past, our guides will gladly take you down the Road to Revolution on this fascinating tour! See event website for more tour dates and times.
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 7:00 PM
Nina Sankovitch, Connecticut author and graduate of Tufts University and Harvard Law School, discusses the Lowells, a remarkable family involved in the founding of a new nation and who shaped many aspects of it, including politics and religion. Among its family members was industrialist Francis Cabot Lowell, who essentially began the American Industrial Revolution; American Romantic poet James Russell Lowell; and Amy Lowell, the twentieth century poet who lived openly in a Boston Marriage with the actress Ada Dwyer Russell.
Wednesday, April 12, 2017 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome Harvard Law School's CASS R. SUNSTEIN, the New York Times–bestselling author of "Republic.com" and "The World According to Star Wars," for a discussion of his latest book, "#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media." As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand each other. It's also no surprise that terrorist groups have been able to exploit social media to deadly effect.
Thursday, April 13, 2017 3:00 PM4:00 PM
This is the story of war, refugees, and humanitarian relief, told through the eyes of children and the people who helped them. In this lecture, Belgian best-selling author Anne Provoost will share the harrowing story of World War I refugee children, their families, and the kind strangers who rescued them. Provoost's research on this historical moment uncovered a link to her own grandmother, Anna Vandewalle. Anna arrived in Paris with the first convoy of rescued children in 1915 and stayed in France until 1919. Vandewalle came into the care of The Children of Flanders Rescue Committee, the charity initiative of Edith Wharton.
Thursday, April 13, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Presentation by Chris Daly about Aaron Greenwood (1813-1897), Gardner's 1st engineer and surveyor who kept many journals detailing his activities and those of the town. The program starts after a museum-hosted reception from 6:30-7 PM. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Monday, April 17, 2017 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities, Harvard Book Store, and the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research welcome Boston University's Professor of History and African American Studies LINDA M. HEYWOOD for a discussion of her book, "Njinga of Angola: Africa's Warrior Queen." This event is co-sponsored by the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University. Though largely unknown in the Western world, the seventeenth-century African queen Njinga was one of the most multifaceted rulers in history, a woman who rivaled Elizabeth I and Catherine the Great in political cunning and military prowess. Linda Heywood offers the first full-length study in English of Queen Njinga's long life and political influence, revealing how this Cleopatra of central Africa skillfully navigated-and ultimately transcended-the ruthless, male-dominated power struggles of her time.
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome former Moscow bureau chief for Business Week PAUL STAROBIN, author of "After America: Narratives for the Next Global Age," for a discussion of his latest book, "Madness Rules the Hour: Charleston, 1860 and the Mania for War." In 1860, Charleston, South Carolina, embodied the combustible spirit of the South. No city was more fervently attached to slavery, and no city was seen by the North as a greater threat to the bonds barely holding together the Union. And so, with Abraham Lincoln's election looming, Charleston's leaders faced a climactic decision: they could submit to abolition--or they could drive South Carolina out of the Union and hope that the rest of the South would follow.
Friday, April 21, 2017 12:00 PM
Join us for a poetry reading and presentation by Martin Espada, a critically acclaimed poet and author. Espada has published almost twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. He has dedicated much of his career to the pursuit of social justice, including fighting for Latino rights and reclaiming the historical record. His critically acclaimed collections of poetry have been finalists for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.The Jonathan Edwards Library will have copies of his books on reserve and for loan.
  • Koussevitzky Arts Center, Boland Theatre, Berkshire Community College 1350 West St
  • Pittsfield, Berkshire County, MA (Berkshire)
  • contact: 413-236-2103
  • email: laney@berkshirecc.edu
  • cost: Free and open to the public
Friday, April 21, 2017 3:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store, Harvard University's Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics welcome Harvard's Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy SUSANNA SIEGEL, prize-winning author of "The Contents of Visual Experience", for a discussion of her latest book, "The Rationality of Perception." On a traditional conception of the human mind, reasoning can be rational or irrational, but perception cannot. Perception is simply a source of new information, and cannot be assessed for rationality. Susanna Siegel argues that this conception is wrong. Drawing on examples involving racism, emotion, self-defense law, and scientific theories, "The Rationality of Perception" makes the case that perception itself can be rational or irrational.
Friday, April 21, 2017 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome artist and activist NIA KING and writer and organizer ELENA ROSE for a celebration of local queer and trans artists of color. The night will include performances by social worker and story teller NEHA RAYAMAJHI and poet, performer, and Harvard Ph.D. student JACKIE WANG. Nia and Elena will also present their book "Queer & Trans Artists of Color Vol. 2," a collection of interviews from King's podcast We Want the Airwaves. Copies of King's first volume of interviews, "Queer & Trans Artists of Color: Stories of Some of Our Lives," will also be available for purchase this evening.
Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:00 PM10:00 PM
There is an epidemic of extinction of silence on our planet. World renowned nature sound recordist and acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton works to protect the few remaining quiet places from noise pollution so that we may listen to nature at its most natural. The film takes place on the Olympic Peninsula, the largest coniferous forest and only rain forest in the continental United States. It also features his world renowned and award-winning sound recordings. Nature sounds have been recognized as crucial indicators of environmental quality ever since the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring. Traveling across the planet to every continent since the late 1960s, noted musician and soundscape ecologist Dr. Bernie Krause has recorded more than 15,000 species - marine and terrestrial. Panel Moderator: Mindy Todd, WCAI
Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:00 PM7:00 PM
The Art Salon, a dynamic social evening of engaging presentations by established and emerging artists in the Pioneer Valley. The public is invited to meet the artists and join in a friendly, social gathering of conversations about the arts in our community. Light refreshments will be served. The Art Salon takes place several times per year all over Pioneer Valley, and Double Edge is pleased to host this special event. This event is part of a series exploring the relationship between culture, community, and democracy, in conjunction with Double Edges Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair, and will celebrate Ashfield area artists under the leadership of Michal Kuriata, Double Edge's lead designer and painter.
  • to be determined
  • Ashfield, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: 413-628-0277
  • web: www.doubleedgetheatre.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, April 27, 2017 2:30PM3:45 PM
"Weeping" is the three time award winning novel, based on the true story of two teenage girls from different cultures, whose paths intertwine, dramatically altering the course of their lives. Participation in the library book discussion that began on April 6th is not necessary in order to attend this special presentation by the author. A reception will follow.
Thursday, April 27, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Another presentation by author Joni Mayhan about Gardner's haunted Victorian mansion. Back again due to an overwhelming interest. This event will include information about the current state of renovations in the historic building. The program starts after a museum-hosted reception from 6:30-7 PM. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Saturday, April 29, 2017 11:00 AM4:00 PM
Join us for celebrations and explorations of African life and culture! We will dance, play, socialize, and more! Each Saturday will also have a special theme with activities for children and their families; this week, the theme is African Musical Instruments.
Sunday, April 30, 2017 2:00 PM3:00 PM
Garden historian Kathryn Aalto will discuss how the magical forests of south east England inspired A.A. Milne to create the cherished tales of Winnie-the-Pooh and the Hundred Acre Wood. Aalto takes readers through an exploration of the real landscapes, shares iconic moments from the books, and celebrates the interplay of landscape and literature.
Monday, May 1, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Monday, May 1, 2017 Monday, October 30, 2017
From the golden dome of the State House to the elegant homes of Louisburg Square, the Beacon Hill tour travels picturesque streets, highlighting examples of early American architecture with particular emphasis on the work of Charles Bulfinch. Experience Beacon Hill's ornate past, from its rural beginnings to the vision of the Mount Vernon Proprietors, while walking among this historic collection of Federal and Greek Revival row houses. You will also hear the stories of Boston's prominent citizens who have called Beacon Hill their home. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Thursday, May 4, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Assumption College science professor Eric Howe will give a (literally) sparking presentation about the work of Ebenezer Kinnersley, an 18th century scientist, inventor and lecturer, specializing in the investigation of static electricity. The program starts after a museum-hosted reception from 6:30-7 PM. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Friday, May 5, 2017 2:00 PM
Unlike the casual, chaotic way in which early Boston was laid out, the streets of Back Bay are arranged in an orderly grid. Renowned for its elegant homes, the architectural marvels of Copley Square, and its signature stately boulevard, Commonwealth Avenue, the Back Bay is one of Boston's most charming neighborhoods. On this tour you will learn how the Back Bay, once an actual body of water, was filled in and how the neighborhood was developed in the mid-1800s to become one of America's richest collections of art and architecture. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 7:00 PM
Allison Lange, assistant professor of history at Wentworth Institute of Technology, Ph.D. from Brandeis University, is an historian who focuses on gender, culture and politics. She completed her work on her doctorate by focusing on women's suffrage and the 19th Amendment. She discusses women's rights and women's suffrage movements to trace the development of modern political campaigns.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 Saturday, October 28, 2017
By the mid-nineteenth century, Boston had earned the nickname "The Athens of America," as an important center for literature and as home to many of America's greatest writers. This literary tour highlights the homes and haunts of such prominent Victorians as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Charles Dickens, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Collectively, they made Boston the epicenter of American letters. What brick building went from being an apothecary's shop to the headquarters of literary Boston? What was the Saturday Club and where did they meet? For answers to these questions and more, join your guide for a stroll through Boston's literary history. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 6, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00 AM
This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city's establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city's architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development. This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America. From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence. Check website for other days and times.
Saturday, May 13, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Thursday, May 18, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
High School students explore local and regional history topics. The winning research paper receives a $250 award tonight. 3 Finalists will read their essays. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Saturday, May 20, 2017 10:00 AM
This child's-eye view of the Freedom Trail is especially designed for young walkers from 6-12 years of age. Walking along Boston's historic Freedom Trail and part of Boston's original coastline, children will experience the historical sites that played a key role in American independence. Learning about the Boston Massacre on the site where it occurred brings a new dimension to the study of American history. Our guides love to point out the fun and interesting attractions along the route such as a 1743 weather vane, the Royal Lion and Unicorn, and statues of Benjamin Franklin. Our guides will help your child learn about our Boston's role in the American Revolution and discover the materials from which a city is built. Check website for more tour dates and times.
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00 PM
A walk through Boston is a walk through time! The eclectic urban landscape is composed of layers of history whose story is revealed by the clues left behind. The city has aggressively reinvented itself over and over again to accommodate a growing population, the needs of business and industry, public and private transportation and public health and safety. It is engineered. Discover all the layers of Boston and the hows and whys of its changes: the invention of the telephone, the first American subway, the rise and fall of interstate highways, the recovery of the harbor, and perhaps even a forgotten body of water that was once Ben Franklin's favorite swimming hole. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Sunday, May 21, 2017 1:00PM3:00PM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore the Southwest Corridor Park. The Park was the result of protests about the creation of an eight lane highway running through Boston's southwestern neighborhoods. Jamaica Plain's residents played an important role in stopping the planned I-95 and the efforts to create a park out of the razed land. This historical walking tour will follow the path of the park and discuss the changes in landscape to that section of Jamaica Plain and the communities that forced those changes to happen. Free and open to the public. Please note the tour will follow the SW Corridor Park (while it starts at the Jackson Square T stop, the tour will end near the Green St T stop). We invite you to continue the conversation at Doyle's Cafe after the tour, where light refreshments will be on offer (cash bar).
  • Jackson Square T Stop, 240 Centre Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.jphs.org
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
A panel discussion on the historical role of immigration in the city's economic development. How did immigrants from Ireland, Italy, Greece, and other countries shape early Somerville? More recently, immigrants have come to the city from all over the world including Brazil, Haiti, and Cape Verde. What are the participants' hopes for the future of immigration and economic life of the city? How is the role of immigration in Somerville's history significant?
Thursday, May 25, 2017 5:00 PM6:15 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join Kate for an intimate conversation with author Ariel Levy about her new work, "The Rules Do Not Apply: A Memoir."
Saturday, May 27, 2017 4:00 PM
America's oldest neighborhood is a delightful labyrinth of narrow streets and exotic marketplaces. A gateway for immigrants from around the world, the North End is also home to the Old North Church, Copp's Hill Burying Ground, and the Paul Revere House. Isolated from the rest of downtown by the construction of the old Central Artery in the 1950s, the North End remains largely preserved from modern development. Upon entering the North End, you will be greeted by the new North End parks of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway. Walking among the Italian markets and one of Boston's largest collection of colonial buildings, you'll hear the story of a changing neighborhood from the time of Cotton Mather to present day re-gentrification. See event website for more tour dates and times.
Saturday, May 27, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore a fascinating industrial area at the geographic heart of Boston that includes 19th-century tannery and brewery buildings, the homes of early German settlers, and today's Boston Beer Company, the brewers of Samuel Adams. In the 1970s, a coalition of community groups joined together to block construction of the Southwest Expressway through Jamaica Plain and other Boston neighborhoods. Today, the Southwest Corridor Park that runs through the Stony Brook neighborhood stands as a testament to the power of community activism. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 10:30 AM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Thursday, June 1, 2017 6:00 PM8:00 PM
Sip a Tauntini and test your general knowledge during a night of trivia inspired by Taunton. Winners will receive a special prize. OCHM After Hours is a program for artists, aspiring artists, and young professionals (21 and older) looking for an evening for low-key, hands-on fun. Developed in conjunction with the Museum's art and history collections and special exhibitions, each OCHM After Hours program will include a variety of live music, hands-on art-making, food, beer, wine, cocktails and more! Each one will be different and offer a new way for people to get involved.
Thursday, June 1, 2017 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Professor Ben Railton will discuss his four books and online public scholarship on the tension at the heart of American identity. The program starts after a museum-hosted reception from 6:30-7 PM. Reservation per e-mail or phone call is required!
Saturday, June 3, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, June 3, 2017
An exhibit of paintings by Double Edge Resident Designer Michal Kuriata will be held March 2nd through March 29th at Elmer's Store, located at 396 Main Street in Ashfield. Gallery hours will be held during Elmer's regular business hours. The exhibit is part of a series of events exploring the relationship between culture, community, and democracy, in conjunction with Double Edge's Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair, June 3 & 4.
Saturday, June 3, 2017 Sunday, June 4, 2017
We are dancing, singing, flying, speaking, painting, and acting throughout the Center of Ashfield, from the community hall through the commons, on Main Street, to the Lake! And WE means anyone and everyone in Ashfield, the Hilltowns, and beyond. The Ashfield Town Spectacle and Culture Fair will use the whole town as the set, present-day Ashfield life and the town's history as the subject, and YOU, the community, as the performers and creators. A celebration of Ashfield's unique history of acceptance, freedom, and creativity, performed in the heart of the town by the people of this community.
Saturday, June 10, 2017 1:00 PM3:00PM
Are you interested in music? Poetry? Storytelling? Do you want to learn more about these things? Join us for an afternoon program featuring local artists who will be sharing their songs, poems, stories, and artwork in a casual, friendly setting. You can come and just listen, or if you would like to participate, let us know as there is a limited number of open slots to share your work. Schedule: Ethel Fraga, poet Alan O'Hare, storyteller and more!
Sunday, June 11, 2017 12:00 PM6:00 PM
The Brockton Historical Society invites visitors to spend a fun "Sunday in the Park with George - Keith" in a recreated pop-up Campello Village of 1917. Visitors will see buildings that represent a slice of life. Visitors can ask the villagers "What was the Keith Theater? Who owned the small shops? What was it like attending the Huntington School? How did you feel when you arrived as an immigrant? Did you work in a shoe factory?" One of the most famous was run by George E. Keith - the WalkOver Company. Brockton today is a city of immigrants. By connecting face to face with our past, our purpose is to create common ground to build understanding and pride in our city.
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.
Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:00 PM6:15 PM
Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount. Join Kate for an intimate conversation with author Lee Siegel about his memoir, "The Draw."
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 6:30 PM8:00 PM
The Somerville Council on Aging will host a slideshow and discussion about the economic history of Somerville's oldest commercial district, Union Square. The discussion will profile some of the Square's biggest employers beginning in the 1800s, including the meat-packing, glass-blowing, and textile finishing industries. The event will also feature a selection of photographs and histories of businesses spanning the last 100 years. What forces have historically shaped working life in Somerville? How did the advent of railroads impact the local economy, and how does that history inform the present? How does the city's economic past affect Somerville's identity today?
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Creaking floors, slamming doors, and ghostly footsteps - The Mount's haunted history includes it all! Take a guided tour of the most haunted parts of the estate to find out who may still call The Mount home. Advance reservations are required. This spooky tour is not recommended for children under 12.
Saturday, July 1, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, July 8, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to explore this National Historic District which includes one of the finest collections of Victorian houses in the area. Sumner Hill includes the ancestral home of the Dole Pineapple Company founder and the homes of progressives who were active as both abolitionists and women suffragists. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed
Sunday, July 16, 2017 1:30 PM3:00 PM
This season, The Mount, in partnership with SculptureNow, is pleased to welcome back an exhibition of large-scale outdoor sculptures. Join us for a free 90-minute artist-guided tour of this world-class show, and hear the stories behind the art and artists. The tour will start at the Ticketbooth at 1:30 pm. The tour includes access to The Mount's grounds, Cafe, and Bookstore only. The tour will commence rain or shine.
Saturday, July 22, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to learn about 1840s Hyde Square when German and Irish immigrants transformed the neighborhood with their businesses, schools, and institutions. See how in the early 1960s, Hyde Square changed again when Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican immigrants transformed it into Boston's first predominantly Hispanic neighborhood. This tour also takes us to the home of Maud Cuney Hare, a prominent music historian and one of only two black women students at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1890. You will also learn about the property currently housing the MSPCA's Angell Animal Medical Center which was once a site of the Perkins School for the Blind. The tour will also walk through the Sunnyside neighborhood, the site of homes built by philanthropist Robert Treat Paine from 1889 to 1899 as a "worker's utopia" for working families. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Saturday, August 19, 2017 11:00AM
Join the Jamaica Plain Historical Society to tour a residential area that includes a National Historic District. View architecture that spans three centuries; the oldest community theater company in the United States; and an elegant 18th-century mansion that once served as the country's first military hospital. Learn about the monument that commemorates fallen Civil War soldiers from West Roxbury and about Pauline Agassiz Shaw who established the class that became the model for continuous free kindergarten education. We will visit a house dating to 1716 that once served as a tavern, the Eliot School dating back to 1689, the home of the first woman to graduate from MIT and the First Church Burying Ground. Tours last between 60 and 90 minutes and are canceled in case of heavy rain. No reservations are required, just meet the guide at the location listed.
Sunday, September 17, 2017 1:00 PM2:30 PM
This talk and discussion will focus on Boston's Hidden Sacred Spaces.

Exhibits

Friday, July 15, 2016 Wednesday, May 31, 2017
"Picturing Frederick Douglass," the first major exhibition of photographs of the famed abolitionist, promises to revolutionize our knowledge of race and photography in 19th-century America. Many were unpublished, forgotten for decades, and previously unseen by contemporary viewers. Several were taken in Boston. Together, the images trace Douglass's visual journey from self-emancipated man to firebrand abolitionist and elder statesman, and they narrate a photographic autobiography across a half-century of history. Douglass, who was in love with photography, sat for his portrait whenever possible, from his earliest known photograph in 1841 until his passing in 1895. As a result, he became the most photographed American of the 19th century; more photographed than President Abraham Lincoln. Picturing Frederick Douglass offers a visually stunning re-introduction to America's first black celebrity immediately recognizable in his own lifetime by millions.
  • 46 Joy St.
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: maah.org
  • cost: Admission by donation, Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
Friday, October 28, 2016 1:00 PMSaturday, April 29, 2017 4:00 PM
The Framingham History Center is unveiling an exhibition of its extensive costume collection with fashions ranging from tea-gowns to flapper dresses to an elaborate kimono representing the influence of Japanese design on ladies' salons across the country. These styles and the stories of the women who wore them provides a fascinating glimpse into their lives, their times, and their town. Parking: Please park on 3 Oak St. (street parking available) or in the Village Hall lot (2 Oak St.). Hours: 1:00-4:00 p.m., Wednesdays through Saturdays.
Monday, March 13, 2017 Thursday, March 30, 2017
This exhibit is a project of the Humanities Action Lab at the New School in New York developed by students, faculty and community partners at twenty universities across the country. Students from the UMass Amherst Public History Program have added a local component of a timeline of incarceration in Northampton from the 1600s to the present. In addition, there will be a small exhibit of artifacts related to Northampton jails. The exhibit will be on view at Historic Northampton and Forbes Library. Since neither institution was large enough to host the exhibit in its entirety, half the exhibit will be at Forbes and half will be at Historic Northampton. Opening reception at Historic Northampton is 3/13/2017 from 5-8 PM.
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 1:00 PMSunday, September 3, 2017 4:00 PM
See the progression of bridal gown designs from 1870 to the present. The gowns all come from a private collection and are accompanied by headpieces. The exhibit will run until Labor Day during regular museum opening hours Wednesday-Sunday from 1-4 PM

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