Events

Tuesday, October 16, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
By 1938, nearly 150,000 German Jews had fled Nazi rule. Many sought refuge in the United States and elsewhere, but were turned away due to anti-Semitic immigration quotas and policies. In response to growing pressure, President Franklin D. Roosevelt convened the Evian Conference in Evian-les-Bains, France to discuss the fate of Europe's fleeing Jews. Delegates from thirty-two countries met, but only one nation agreed to welcome these refugees: the Dominican Republic. Join Hugh Baver, Chairman of Sosua75.org to learn more about the conference, how he directed an "Evian Revisited 80th Anniversary Educational Symposium" this past July back in Evian, its context, content, outcomes, and participants, and how the settlement on the North Coast of the Dominican Republic, Sosua, came to be.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:30 PM9:00 PM
Known widely as a simple and courageous mother figure, in fact Harriet Tubman was an intelligent, crafty, fearless visionary who transcended assumptions about black women's abilities, leading scores of enslaved people to freedom. Author of the first adult biography of Tubman, historian Kate Clifford Larson will share new Tubman scholarship and describe recent public history initiatives related to her life and role in the Underground Railroad. Copies of Bound for the Promised Land will be available for purchase and signing.
  • Royall House and Slave Quarters, 15 George Street
  • Medford, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: 781-396-9032
  • web: www.royallhouse.org
  • email: director@royallhouse.org
  • cost: Free for RH&SQ members; general admission $10.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
The 1918 flu pandemic killed up to 100 million people worldwide in less than a year, disproportionately taking healthy young adults. The personal impact was devastating and wide-reaching. This talk draws on stories and newspaper articles to explore the multi-faceted ways the 1918 flu impacted families, sometimes for generations.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 12:00 PM1:00 PM
Join us at the State Library of Massachusetts for an author talk and book signing with Barbara Berenson, Senior Attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and author of the new book "Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement: Revolutionary Reformers." In anticipation of the 2020 centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the book explores the Bay State's pivotal role in the amendment's passage.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 6:30 PM8:30 PM
Join Colonel Earl "The Pearl" Wederbrook, USMC (Ret) on a short trip through time to compare and contrast the occupation of Boston in 1776 with Berlin in 1945 and Baghdad in 2004. Col. Wederbrook will discuss and analyze the military, political, economic, social and moral aspects and consequences of using the military to quell civil unrest, occupy conquered territory or aid in nation building. Afterwards, join us for a reception and conversation with Col. Wederbrook, a representative of the Office of Veterans Services, and several veterans from post-9/11 deployments for an intimate discussion on what it's like being the occupier in a foreign land and how to adapt to civilian life upon return home.
Thursday, October 18, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Public historian and landscape architect Tom Paine will bring to life the remarkable story of Robert Treat Paine, America's Founding Father from Taunton. A sixth-generation descendant of Robert Treat Paine, Tom will delve into the family stories that were passed down to and inspired him, and touch on descendants of the Civil War generation whom he inspired in turn. Paine signed the Declaration of Independence, was the first Attorney of Massachusetts, and had a role in crafting the world's oldest modern constitution and the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts. The talk will show how Paine's distinctive traits of character provide a compelling example of what Tom calls "America's DNA."
Thursday, October 18, 2018 7:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome JANE SHERRON DE HART, professor emerita of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, for a discussion of her latest book, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life." In this large, comprehensive, revelatory biography, De Hart explores the central experiences that crucially shaped Ginsburg's passion for justice, her advocacy for gender equality, her meticulous jurisprudence: her desire to make We the People more united and our union more perfect.
Friday, October 19, 2018 6:00 PM9:00 PM
Our main fundraiser of the year coincides with the WWI Armistice Centennial, so join us in celebrating the end of the war with an elegant dinner party! This night to remember will feature a full dinner, a raffle and live auction of wonderful getaways and experiences, and a variety of WWI-era live music and entertainment to help celebrate the war's end. Period costumes are encouraged--the jazz age is just about to start, so bob your hair and join in the fun! $125 per person, and sponsorships and program ad space are available. Donations, including those made in memory of servicemen and women, will be acknowledged in our program.
Saturday, October 20, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Come walk the Liberty and Union Downtown Walking Tour! Join us for a free, one-hour guided tour of Historic Downtown Taunton. Our one-mile walking tour highlights some of the important architectural, cultural, and commercial sites between Church Green and Taunton Green. A great way to learn about the city, from its earliest days through the present, these tours are the third Saturday of every month, May through October.
Saturday, October 20, 2018 12:00 PM4:00 PM
Liberty and Union Weekend is an annual celebration of the unique role that the City of Taunton played in our nation's founding. The weekend is held each fall to commemorate the events of October 1774, when Taunton became the first community in the American colonies to raise a flag--the Liberty and Union--in opposition to British rule. Liberty and Union Weekend 2018 will feature a tavern tour on Friday, October 19 and a festival on Saturday, October 20, with activities for residents and visitors of all ages. Programs will include 18th century re-enactors and artisans, farming and livestock displays, a ceremonial flag-raising and free pumpkin decorating for children. There will be food, fun, and lots to see and do. You won't want to miss it!
Saturday, October 20, 2018 9:30 AM2:30 PM
Sign up for Save the Harbor's "Share the Harbor" fall cruise to Spectacle Island on Saturday October 20th with Boston Harbor Now, the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the National Park Service. Please arrive at 9:30am at the World Trade Center dock to check in. We will board the Bay State Cruise Company's flagship Provincetown II at 9:45am. The boat will leave promptly at 10:00am whether or not you are on it! Guests will return to the dock at 1:30pm to return to Boston by 2:30pm. Please note that the Boston Harbor Islands National & State Park enforces a carry on, carry off policy: please bring a bag for your trash and dispose of it back on the boat.
Sunday, October 21, 2018 5:00 PM6:00 PM
Fog x Macbeth brings Shakespeare's tragedy of political ambition, blood, and flawed humans into the landscape of the Arnold Arboretum, and the art and shifting atmosphere of Fujiko Nakaya's fog sculpture. The play's live site-specific performance will resonate with Frederick Law Olmsted's landscape design and Fog x FLO, Nakaya's fog installation throughout Boston's Emerald Necklace park system. Witches, murder, intrigue: all will be revealed in the fog...or will it? All seating is free and on the lawn. Bring a blanket, a low chair, and a picnic.
Sunday, October 21, 2018 1:00 PM2:15 PM
Discover decidedly unstuffy history at the Andover Center for History & Culture Sunday, October 21. At 1:00 PM discover Andover 101: 10,000 years of history in 75 minutes. And at 3:00 PM discover Andover 102: 30 miles of history in 60 minutes. Come to one, come to both. Register early as programs fill quickly!
Monday, October 22, 2018 6:30 PM8:00 PM
In advance of Liza Jessie Peterson's The Peculiar Patriot, join ArtsEmerson, The Museum of African American History, and the Suffolk County Sheriff's Department for a public dialogue with Liza Jessie Peterson, Suffolk County Sheriff Steve Tompkins, moderated by Lizzy Cooper Davis. Together, they will examine Liza's idea of "Peculiar Patriotism" practice: resisting status quo and advocating for what is right by supporting and loving those the criminal justice system has deemed "guilty."
  • African Meeting House at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617.824.3063
  • web: www.artsemerson.org
  • email: Kevin_becerra@emerson.edu
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Was it a trick of the light? Or just a dream from which you couldn't quite wake? The yawning terrors of the night usually recede by dawn, but they sometimes linger as shadows in our minds. Continuing our popular Halloween tradition, Professors Gino DiIorio (Theater), Jay Elliott (English), and Jennifer Plante (The Writing Center) will read scary tales of the uncanny, the unknowable, and the unfathomable.
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Jewish ritual and custom are a wise, compassionate pathway through the pain and darkness of caring for the dying, burying the dead, mourning, and comforting the bereaved. Join author Anita Diamant as she explores how the time-honored ritual of saying Kaddish can be a meaningful source of comfort in the 21st century. Reception to follow. In connection with the exhibit, "Memorials and Mourning: Material Expressions of Grief," on display at New England Historic Genealogical Society now through November 16.
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 12:00 PM1:00 PM
When they survive, headstones can offer important clues to understanding the lives of those who came before us. Join author of "A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries," NEHGS Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert to learn how these memorials, from the type of the stone used to the carvings to the position of the family plot to the burial documents left behind, can shed new light on your ancestor's life.
Thursday, October 25, 2018 6:00 PM8:30 PM
Who is safe and welcome here? Join us for an evening exploring the history of welcoming and exclusion in Cambridge, from its founding to the present day. Hear from local experts and join a conversation around these urgent questions: How have immigrants been welcomed and not welcomed in Cambridge? How does the local sanctuary movement, and our status as a sanctuary city, define who we are? How can our local history help us understand what's needed now? What are key moments in the city's past highlighting contention around immigration? What's our role in creating a welcoming city and upholding a neighborly social contract? Featuring a storytelling intro by ENROOT students, sharing their experiences as newcomers.
Thursday, October 25, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Remember last winter when the terrible flu season had us all taking some extra precautions? Our own Paul Allison takes us further back in time to the winter of 1918 and the peak of the Spanish Influenza's devastation that plagued the world. What was it like locally and nationally to live through such a pandemic, which took as many as 50 million lives worldwide? Could such a horrific sickness strike again? This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 PM with the talk to begin at 7 PM.
Saturday, October 27, 2018 5:00 PM8:00 PM
Old Colony History Museum's Historical Hall will transform into a terrifyingly fun spot where revelers ages 21 and up can enjoy a costume contest, sophisticated cocktails, and "horror d'oeuvres." Our portrait gallery will haunt you while all the tricks and treats delight you. Learn about the dark secrets of Taunton's past on our Haunted History Downtown Walking Tour.
Sunday, October 28, 2018
Join Mass Humanities in conferring the Governor's Award upon three exemplary honorees whose public actions have been grounded in an appreciation of the humanities and have enhanced civic life in the Commonwealth. The honorees: Ellen Dunlap, David Harris, Nancy Netzer, and David Tebaldi. Reception begins at 5:00 PM, followed by dinner and The Governor's Awards in the Humanities.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 3:30 PM5:00 PM
This year's forum will explore the role of the humanities in addressing what many consider the most urgent challenge facing the world today. As our nation was founded, debates arose on how to achieve the proper balance of power between (among others) a more landed aristocracy and laboring citizens; between a central executive, a representative legislature, and the courts; between educated experts and ordinary voters; between private interests and the public good. History has proven the American system of government to be remarkably resilient managing difficult crises and serving as a model for other emerging democracies throughout the globe. Some question, however, whether our current national and international institutions can solve the looming global environmental challenges of our time. It is impossible to debate potential solutions if we cannot first define the problem. This forum will feature historians, scientists, policy makers, activists and, we hope, a cross section of the general public.
Wednesday, October 31, 2018
The Old Colony History Museum preserves more than two dozen objects and over a hundred manuscript documents from Taunton's earliest decades. The collection illustrates the role the interior town of Taunton played in the Plymouth Colony, the daily life of its inhabitants, the ironworks industry, relations between Settlers and local Natives, and its wider connections to 17th Century New England and the Atlantic World. Mass Humanities funded Scholar-in-Residence Stephen O'Neill will present his research on the collections to explore an often-overlooked region and history of Plymouth Colony.
Thursday, November 1, 2018 7:00 PM8:30 PM
In 1998, DNA testing corroborated what family histories and the archival record had shown all along: Thomas Jefferson fathered children by Sally Hemings, an enslaved woman on the Monticello plantation. This connection was denied by naysayers for centuries but is widely acknowledged today. An accurate account of the Hemingses is now shared at Monticello, thanks to ongoing initiatives such as the Getting Word oral history project and the new Sally Hemings exhibit that debuted this past spring. In this talk, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annette Gordon-Reed (Harvard Law School and Harvard University) will examine the fascinating history of this American family and reflect on its implications for genealogical inquiry, scholarly method, and public history.
  • Higgins Lounge, 2nd Floor of Dana Commons, Clark University Campus
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (508) 793-7479
  • web: bit.ly/Hemings
  • email: HigginsSchool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, November 3, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
The morning of November 25th, 1856, Mary Chipman Lawrence set sail aboard the whaling ship Addison bound for the Pacific on a voyage that would last three and a half years. In this performance, Mary will bring forth from her meticulously kept journal, the joys and tribulations of life at sea with her husband, Captain Samuel Lawrence, and their daughter Minnie. The sights and sounds of foreign ports and their inhabitants, the sailors' sea shanties, the surprisingly robust social life amongst whaling ships, and the challenging everyday details, all will come to life as Mary takes you on a journey so real, you'll feel the pitch of the ship and the spray over the rails. Come join us as re-enactor Anne Barrett takes you through the adventures of Mary Chipman Lawrence!
Saturday, November 3, 2018 10:00 AM3:00 PM
Bring your diaries, photographs, letters, maps, business memorabilia. images and other family/cultural heirlooms. Volunteers from MCLA, the North Adams Public Library, and the North Adams Historical Society will digitize your items, interview to hear your stories, and return your items to you with preservation materials to help you care for your pieces of North Adams history.
  • North Adams Public Library, 74 Church St
  • North Adams, Berkshire County, MA (Berkshire)
  • contact: (413) 662-3133
  • web: www.naplibrary.com
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, November 4, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Women played an important role in the Brook Farm transcendentalist community in the 1840s, where they enjoyed rights and privileges equal to the male members. After the demise of Brook Farm, many became active in the suffrage and abolitionist movements. In this living history presentation, you will meet Margaret Fuller, Sophia Ripley, and other remarkable women associated with Brook Farm. How did they understand and live the social contract at Brook Farm? Then, join a discussion of the social contract in the 21st century. What are our rights and responsibilities as members of a diverse community? Dr. Kerri Greenidge, co-director of the African American Trail Project at the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, will guide the discussion.
  • Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, room L2
  • Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-694-6407
  • web: www.newbrookfarm.org
  • email: info@newbrookfarm.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, November 15, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
In his new book, Vincent Luti focuses on an aspect of our history that has been largely overlooked; the 18th century Taunton River Basin School of Gravestone Carvers. This rich heritage of early American folk artifacts is a precious resource for scholars of all stripes, and something to be enjoyed by an appreciative public as well. The native work of this overlooked area now has its deserved place in the story of American folk art culture as evidenced in its early gravestones and their carvers. Mr. Luti is one of the most knowledgeable people in the world regarding the history of tombstone carvers in New England. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 pm with the talk to begin at 7 pm.
Monday, November 26, 2018 2:00 PM4:00 PM
A fun art event where youth will paint or draw what signifies an African family. Artwork will be displayed and the jury will choose winners using criteria like most detailed, color theme, use of space, and creativeness. Fun art activities for all ages available. Come one, come all, and let's dive into the fine art imagination with Abel!
Saturday, December 1, 2018 10:00 AM12:00 PM
Become a part of local history! Bring us a photo taken in the Taunton area and let us scan it for our digital collection. We'll give you back the original and your image will become a part of our archive collection. Bring in your photographs, preferably loose rather than in an album, and unframed. Anything up through 11 x 17 inches is welcome. Please provide us any information you have about the photos. People, places, events, local landmarks, holiday displays--share your photographs, memories, and even help us solves some mysteries! No more than five per person, please. Visit those attics, sort those closets, and dig out those boxes of mementos to help us add to the photographic record of our local community!
Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:00 PM8:00 PM
In the shadow of the Holocaust, what is the world's continuing responsibility to prevent genocide and mass atrocity crimes and hold accountable those who commit them? In recent decades genocide and mass atrocities have been committed in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, Darfur, Libya and Syria, among other places. The world stood by and did nothing in several of these situations, but intervened in others under the UN doctrine of responsibility to protect. Today, nationalism and authoritarianism are on the rise, the US has withdrawn from human rights leadership, and support for implementing the responsibility to protect has diminished in the UN. John Shattuck is a former US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor who participated in the successful international effort to end the genocidal war in Bosnia, and helped establish the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.
Saturday, December 8, 2018 11:00 AM12:00 PM
Join us for a friendly discussion with a group of people who love to read and discuss good books. Scheduled to meet monthly on the second Saturday, newcomers are always welcome to join the group. For December we will be reading A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens. A Christmas Carol has long been one of the most beloved stories in the English language. As much a part of the holiday season as holly, mistletoe, and evergreen wreaths, this perennial favorite continues to delight new readers and rekindle thoughts of charity and goodwill.
Thursday, December 13, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
Friday, December 14, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
  • Charlestown Working Theater, 442 Bunker Hill St.
  • Charlestown, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.actorsshakespeareproject.org/plays-events/macbeth/
  • cost: $10 for adults; $5 for youth under 21; free for any patrons facing financial hardship
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, December 15, 2018 7:30 PM9:30 PM
Actors' Shakespeare Project's young people take on Shakespeare's brooding and supernatural tragedy of a ruthless king's rise to power and the retribution visited upon him for his bloody deeds.
  • Charlestown Working Theater, 442 Bunker Hill St.
  • Charlestown, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • web: www.actorsshakespeareproject.org/plays-events/macbeth/
  • cost: $10 for adults; $5 for youth under 21; free for any patrons facing financial hardship
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, December 20, 2018 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Enjoy a dramatic reading of the classic holiday tale by Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. Paul Hayden narrates, along with various members of OCHM's board and community playing their parts of the story while you enjoy refreshments sure to transport you back to Dickensian England. All ages are welcome to join us for this nostalgic evening to celebrate the holiday season.
Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 6:00 PM8:30 PM
The UU Urban Ministry is pleased to welcome long-time Roxbury resident, community organizer, and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones to facilitate a community reading series featuring works by influential women. These moving readings with audience participation will be followed by a conversation about the author's words, their place in history, and their relevance today. Event is free, dinner will be served, and all are welcome. Please join us!
  • 10 Putnam Street (use 8 John Eliot Square for parking lot)
  • Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-318-6010
  • web: www.uuum.org
  • email: ghagen@uuum.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Sunday, April 9, 2017 Sunday, December 8, 2019
Networks. Posting. Sharing. Memes. These may sound like buzzwords describing 21st century social media, but all had their equivalents in the 18th century, some with the same names. In a time of candlelight and horse drawn carriages, there were many sophisticated communications networks in place. Lexington Historical Society's new exhibit #Alarmed! 18th Century Social Media explores how news went viral 250 years ago, and lets visitors imagine how colonials might have made use of our modern media tools to kick start a revolution. Located on the second floor of the tavern, the exhibit contains nearly a dozen interactive activities. The exhibit team of Susan Bennett, Rick Byer, Stacey Fraser, and Lauren Kennedy hopes that visitors engage with the exhibit in both analog and digital ways. Mass Humanities sponsored a consulting scholar, J. L. Bell, who is a savvy social media user in his own right.
Saturday, February 24, 2018 9:30 AMSunday, February 10, 2019 4:30 PM
This exhibition celebrates both Thomas Chippendale's legacy and the iconic style he helped promote through a number of English and American Rococo decorative art forms from Historic Deerfield's rich collection.
Wednesday, September 5, 2018 1:00 PMFriday, December 21, 2018 4:00 PM
Fall exhibit featuring work and cameras used by photography studios and photographers from the late 1800's to the mid 1970's. Gardner alone had numerous photography studios for portraits and commercial entities over this period, during which photo sessions changed from formal, stern affairs to lighthearted events. The exhibit is shown during regular opening hours Wednesday-Sunday, 1-4 pm, until the end of the year.

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