Events

Friday, July 3, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, July 5, 2015 5:00 PM
Come celebrate the best July 4th in history with old-fashioned, patriotic family fun. For the safety and comfort of all guests, all coolers, bags, chairs, and backpacks will be subject to inspection at the point of admission. Join in the fun as the martial band leads the citizens' procession as they march through the streets. Cheer and huzzah during a rousing patriotic reading of the Declaration of Independence and sign a giant reproduction of the document. Make your own tri-cornered hat to wear as you learn to drill with the Sturbridge Militia. Learn dances done by 19th-century Americans and play a game of "base ball." Watch music and other special performances on the Common.
  • Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road
  • Sturbridge, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (800) 733-1830
  • web: www.osv.org/event/independence-day-celebration-2015
  • cost: $24 Adults, $22 Seniors (55+), $10 Youths (3-17), Children 2 & Under FREE, Woo card discounts available
Monday, July 6, 2015 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome Professor of English at Harvard University GORDON TESKEY for a discussion of his book "The Poetry of John Milton." John Milton is regarded as the greatest English poet after Shakespeare. Yet for sublimity and philosophical grandeur, Milton stands almost alone in world literature. His peers are Homer, Virgil, Dante, Wordsworth, and Goethe: poets who achieve a total ethical and spiritual vision of the world. In this panoramic interpretation, the distinguished Milton scholar Gordon Teskey shows how the poet’s changing commitments are subordinated to an aesthetic that joins beauty to truth and value to ethics. The art of poetry is rediscovered by Milton as a way of thinking in the world as it is, and for the world as it can be.
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 7:00 PM
David Hernandez, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at Mt. Holyoke College will join William Joyce, former immigration judge in Boston, to examine current U. S. immigration law and the practice of detention and deportation. Sofia Campos, (Peru/Los Angeles), board chair 2011-2014 of United We Dream, a national immigrant youth network, brings a vibrant voice to the discussion.
  • Charlemont Federated Church, 175 Main Street
  • Charlemont, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 339-4294
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, July 9, 2015 7:30 PM8:30 PM
From the Shakers to the Transcendentalists, the idea of forming utopian societies in the 19th century were dreams that were realized by several communities in New England. Historic Deerfield's Summer Lecture Series, "Utopian Dreams in 19th Century New England" will focus on the utopian societies in New England and their impact on the communities they inhabited. This first summer lecture by Elizabeth De Wolfe, Professor of History, Chair, University of New England will focus on the Shakers.
Thursday, July 9, 2015 6:00 PM7:30 PM
Join the members of the New Bedford Historical Society in a community reading of Douglass's 1852 fiery speech on the meaning of Independence Day, "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?"
Saturday, July 11, 2015 6:00 PM
In celebration of the 100th anniverary of the founding of the Provincetown Players, which established Provincetown as a center of modernism in the arts, the theater will present four short plays written during the Provincetown Players' formative years, "Suppressed Desires", "Constancy", "Trifles" and "The Sniper". The plays will be presented at 6pm, followed by a Humanities Panel at 8pm moderated by Susan Rand Brown, with O'Neill and Glaspell scholars Robert M. Dowling, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jeffrey Kennedy, and Pulitzer Prize winning American Playwright Tony Kushner. Reception at 9:00pm with John Thomas on piano.
Thursday, July 16, 2015 6:00 PM
Everyone is invited to this community reading of an excerpt of Frederick Douglass' famous speech on human rights, African Americans and the meaning of the Fourth of July and the federal Constitution. Come to the event and read a part of this speech (no more than a few sentences), then participate in a discussion of the meaning of freedom today. No one is too old or too young to be a reader. This is a wonderful family activity to celebrate American freedom.
Thursday, July 16, 2015 7:30 PM8:30 PM
From the Shakers to the Transcendentalists, the idea of forming utopian societies in the 19th century were dreams that were realized by several communities in New England. Historic Deerfield's Summer Lecture Series, "Utopian Dreams in 19th Century New England" will focus on the utopian societies in New England and their impact on the communities they inhabited. This second summer lecture by Robert Gross, Draper Professor of Early American History, University of Connecticut, will focus on Walden.
Saturday, July 18, 2015 10:00AMSunday, July 19, 2015 5:00PM
A festival of indigenous art, music, & cultures from around the world featuring indigenous artists, performers, and handmade products benefiting the livelihoods of artists, projects in their communities, and fair trade. Shop unique folk art, jewelry, clothing, crafts, decor, tribal rugs, & much more. Meet the artists, learn about their art and cultures. Enjoy FREE music performances, presentations, Native American storytelling, educational displays, craft-making demonstrations, & ethnic cuisine.
Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, July 19, 2015 5:00 PM
Hazy Summer Days are not so lazy on the farm. Come visit the farm at Old Sturbridge Village and participate in some of the ways farmers kept busy during the summer, one of the most important times of the year for all farm families in the 19th century. Help the farmers with, arguably, the most important crop each and every year: hay! In the 1800's farmers used the summer months working on the farm. One of their primary goals was to fill their barns with as much hay as it would fit in order to feed their animals through the next winter, never know how long that winter would be. Work occupies most a farm family's time in the summer, but kids are still kids. Children's books from the 1800's are littered with all sorts of games and activities that kept children busy and entertained through the summer. Try some of these activities with us at the Village: playing ball, fishing, school yard games and more will all be waiting for you to try your hand.
  • Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road
  • Sturbridge, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (800) 733-1830
  • web: www.osv.org/event/summer-work-play-2015
  • cost: $24 Adults, $22 Seniors (55+), $10 Youths (3-17), Children 2 & Under FREE, Woo card discounts available
Saturday, July 18, 2015 2:00 PM4:00 PM
Join the Artist in Residence Partners as they unveil their first collaborative public art project, the 54th MA Volunteer Infantry Regiment Mural, dedicated to the brave members of the first African American Civil War Unit activated in the north. Partners include the New Bedford Historical Society, New Bedford Art Museum, New Bedford National Park, UMass College of Visual and Performing Arts, and the Whaling History Alliance.
Sunday, July 19, 2015 2:30 PM
Join us for a screening and discussion of the film "The Refugees of Shangri La." This event is part of the Pluralism Project's Religion Refocused series. About the film: "Bhutan's international reputation precedes it as the Himalayan Kingdom of "Gross National Happiness". However, Bhutan's exiles will tell you a different story; One of cultural persecution, loss of a beloved home, a twenty-year-wait in refugee camps and finally, a new chance in a new country. In the past five years, 75,000 Bhutanese refugees have resettled to America and thousands more in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, The Netherlands, Denmark and so on...This is the story of our new neighbors. The screening is co-sponsored by the Lynn Museum/LynnArts and The Downtown Lynn Cultural District (DTLCD). Religion Refocused is made possible by support from Mass Humanities, a state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 6:00PM7:15PM
Being in nature has the power to heal us and bring us closer to the creative power that resides inside us, waiting to be released. Nature Artist and Writer Julie Zickefoose offers simple tools to help you tap into nature’s power to restore and revive that spirit. Situational awareness is a key part of our evolutionary heritage, and we lose a little of it each time we plug into our omnipresent devices. Yet we can also use them to forge a deeper connection with nature. With prose, photography and poetry, Julie will demonstrate how she hooks into something larger each time she steps outside, and translates that into content—and contentment. This talk will be held in Story Chapel. Funding for programs has been provided in part by the Massachusetts Cultural Council.
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store and Mass Humanities welcome debut short story author MIA ALVAR and acclaimed novelist CELESTE NG for a discussion of Alvar's book, "In the Country: Stories." These nine globe-trotting, unforgettable stories from Mia Alvar, a remarkable new literary talent, vividly give voice to the women and men of the Filipino diaspora. Here are exiles, emigrants, and wanderers uprooting their families from the Philippines to begin new lives in the Middle East, the United States, and elsewhere—and, sometimes, turning back again.
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 6:00 PM10:00 PM
Screening of the award-winning JAMES BALDWIN: THE PRICE OF THE TICKET, newly restored & re-mastered on Widescreen HD in honor of Baldwin's 90th birthday. Dinner and live music before the film, discussion with director Karen Thorsen and Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., after the screening.
  • Chilmark Community Center, 520 S Road
  • Chilmark, Dukes County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: 508-645-9599
  • web: tmvff.org/james-baldwin
  • cost: $10 members; $18 general public
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, July 23, 2015 7:30 PM8:30 PM
From the Shakers to the Transcendentalists, the idea of forming utopian societies in the 19th century were dreams that were realized by several communities in New England. Historic Deerfield's Summer Lecture Series, "Utopian Dreams in 19th Century New England" will focus on the utopian societies in New England and their impact on the communities they inhabited. This third and final summer lecture by Christopher Clark, Professor and Department Head, Department of History, University of Connecticut, will focus on Northampton.
Saturday, August 1, 2015 9:00 AM4:00 PM
Featuring great books and great writing, the MV Book Festival celebrates the island's rich literary heritage with nationally and local renowned authors. Over 30 acclaimed authors will speak throughout the day in a series of panel discussions. Festival continues up island in Chilmark on Sunday.
Saturday, August 1, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, August 2, 2015 5:00 PM
Old Sturbridge Village will be transformed into a military camp from the time of the American War for Independence. Come see what it was like for those who fought to win America's freedoms. Daytime events include: Mock battles and skirmishes, "School of the Soldier" training demonstrations, 18th-century Fashions in the Press featuring military and civilian clothing, Musket drilling with kids, visit the battlefield hospital, see the daily life of a Revolutionary War soldier, learn 18th-century dances, and so much more! Twilight Encampment: On Saturday, stay for special extended hours where visitors can mingle with troops in their camps from 5:00 - 8:00 PM.
  • Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road
  • Sturbridge, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (800) 733-1830
  • web: www.osv.org/event/redcoats-to-rebels-2015
  • cost: Children free in August, $24 Adults, $22 Seniors (55+)
Sunday, August 2, 2015 9:00 AM4:00 PM
Featuring great books and great writing, the festival celebrates the island's rich literary heritage with nationally and locally renowned authors. Over 30 acclaimed authors will speak throughout the day in tents on the grounds of the Chilmark Community Center. Authors will sign their books. Book sales by Bunch of Grapes Bookstore.
Thursday, August 6, 2015 7:00 PM
David Martin, Distinguished Professor of International Law at the University of Virginia, will examine current political and ethical controversies relating to immigration. Alex Morse will reflect on his experience as Mayor of Holyoke, a city with a significant immigrant population. Marise Lyra, (Brazil/Amherst), teacher of English language learners at the Center for New Americans in Northampton, will share her immigration story.
  • Charlemont Federated Church, 175 Main Street
  • Charlemont, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 339-4294
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, August 15, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, August 16, 2015 5:00 PM
Each year, Old Sturbridge Village explores a different aspect of 19th-century textiles. This year will focus on everyday elegance of ladies and gentlemen. If you are interested in 1830s fashion and period dress this special weekend is for you!
  • Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road`
  • Sturbridge, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (800) 733-1830
  • web: www.osv.org/event/textile-weekend-2015
  • cost: Children free in August, $24 Adults, $22 Seniors (55+)
Saturday, September 5, 2015 9:00 AMMonday, September 7, 2015 5:00 PM
Bring the whole family and celebrate Labor Day Weekend with games and excitement for everyone! You're invited to join the fun on these days! You will be able to: play baseball the way early New Englanders did, make a craft, join a game of French and English (Tug of War), meet the oxen in training, try your hand at marbling paper, watch 19th-century magic with Bob Olson, learn a dance with the Old Sturbridge Village Dancers, see a puppet show, watch a toy fire-balloon flight, and so much more!
  • Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road
  • Sturbridge, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: (800) 733-1830
  • web: www.osv.org/event/family-fun-days-2015
  • cost: $24 Adults, $22 Seniors (55+), $10 Youths (3-17), Children 2 & Under FREE, Woo card discounts available
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 9:30 AM5:00 PM
Our Home School Days offer you and your children the opportunity to explore the Village and participate in hands-on activities. This is a great opportunity for children to gain exposure to many aspects of 1830s New England life in an interactive way. We recommend that you allow for up to three hours to visit the Village, in addition to any scheduled hands-on studios. If time permits, consider making a quick craft in the Hands-on Crafts Center; $5-10 per activity (first come, first served); some age and safety restrictions apply.
Saturday, September 19, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, September 20, 2015 5:00 PM
Craft brewers from throughout New England will serve mouth-watering beers in a spectacular beer garden, while exquisite glass artisans, woodcrafters and other tradespeople will demonstrate their work and sell their wares. See 19th century distilling practices along with hard cider sampling, and feast on delicious grilled meats and other treats.
Saturday, October 10, 2015 10:00 AMMonday, October 12, 2015 5:00 PM
A festival of indigenous art, music, & cultures from around the world featuring Indigenous artists, performers, and handmade products benefiting the livelihoods of artists, projects in their communities, and fair trade. Shop unique folk art, jewelry, clothing, crafts, decor, tribal rugs, & much more. Meet the artists, learn about their art and cultures. Enjoy FREE music performances, presentations, Native American storytelling, educational displays, craft-making demonstrations, & ethnic cuisine.
Saturday, November 7, 2015 9:30 AMSunday, November 8, 2015 4:00 PM
Spend some time at OSV learning a historical craft. These adult workshops vary from blacksmithing to textiles, coopering, foodways, and more. Come and try your hand at a craft and take home your finished masterpiece! Unless otherwise specified, workshops will be held in the Museum Education building.

Exhibits

Thursday, February 16, 2012 11:00 AMThursday, December 31, 2015 5:00 PM
A renovated and expanded exhibition about slavery, abolition, and the Underground Railroad including hands-on interactives and audio elements. Tuesday-Friday, 11 AM to 5 PM Saturday and Sunday, 12 Noon to 5 PM Closed Mondays and major holidays
  • Jackson Homestead and Museum, 527 Washington Street
  • Newton, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (617) 796-1450
  • web: www.historicnewton.org/
  • cost: $6 for general admission, $5 for a discounted ticket (Newton residents, seniors, children 6-12 years, AAA members, students with ID), and free for children 5 and under and Historic Newton members
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Thursday, January 1, 2015 Thursday, December 31, 2015
The Museum's new Black Books exhibition and complementary programming examine historical and cultural implications of learning to read and write, as well as publishing the works of free and formerly enslaved African American voices. Free black communities from Boston and beyond began sharing books, newspapers, periodicals, poems, and other writings to advance campaigns for freedom from the Colonial period through the 19th century and for personal expression and enjoyment. These pioneering wordsmiths continue to inspire gifted writers to use their published works as agents for social change. To celebrate their passion for free speech and draw parallels across the ages, Black Books places 18th and 19th century African American authors from the Museum’s collection of rare books in dialogue with more contemporary works. The exhibit and programs feature a wide array of selected genres, including poetry, fiction, autobiography, medicine, military experience, sociology, and music. Lead partners: National Park Service, Boston African American National Historic Site and Suffolk University’s Mildred F. Sawyer Library, where the Museum’s book collection is housed.
  • Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street
  • Boston, Suffolk County, MA (Greater Boston)
  • contact: 617-725-0022, ext. 222
  • web: maah.org
  • cost: Free
Saturday, February 28, 2015 9:30 AMTuesday, February 16, 2016 4:30 PM
A new exhibition in the lobby of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield, highlights the new design style that developed in mid-18th century France and England, referred to today as Neoclassicism, which harkened back to the shapes and ornaments of classical Greece and Rome. It eventually took hold in the United States as the Federal style, and can be seen in everything from architecture to furniture, emphasizing clean, geometric lines and more delicate Neoclassical detailing. Characteristic motifs of the Neoclassical style are frequent use of swags, festoons, ribbons, beading, vases, and urns. Neoclassical forms and decoration will be seen in objects in the exhibition that range from ceramics and card tables to needlework pictures and prints.
Saturday, May 2, 2015 Saturday, September 12, 2015
This exceptional, compelling selection of 48 icons and extraordinary artifacts from the British Museum traces the stylistic development of sacred art from ancient Byzantium, center of Christian civilization, to the introduction of Christianity to Russia. The exhibition of rare icons will also include Byzantine cast metal objects, ivories and engraved gems. This is the first time the renowned British Museum in London has lent Saint John the Baptist (Constantinople c. 1300) and the famous Saint George and the Dragon (Pskov, late 14th century) to a museum in the U.S.A. These extraordinarily rare icons—two of the oldest and finest icons in existence—alone are worth a visit to the exhibit. In addition to the icons and artifacts from the British Museum, the exhibition will be augmented with related icons from the collection of the Museum of Russian Icons.

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