Events

Saturday, February 6, 2016 2:00 PM5:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story. Make and take your own hand-printed valentines! Drop in, all ages. FREE.
Monday, February 8, 2016 4:00 PM7:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 4:00 PM6:00 PM
In celebration of Black History Month, a panel of historians from the Five College Consortium will discuss a new book by a University of Massachusetts professor that overturns long-held assumptions about the abolitionist movement. "The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition" shows that rather than being composed of white, bourgeois, racially paternalistic reformers, abolitionism was a radical movement of women and men, black and white, slave and free who supported feminism, labor rights and utopian socialism. Reception and book signing to follow.
Thursday, February 11, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcome acclaimed historian ELLEN FITZPATRICK for a discussion of her book The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women's Quest for the American Presidency. Ellen Fitzpatrick tells the story of three remarkable women who set their sights on the American presidency. Victoria Woodhull (1872), Margaret Chase Smith (1964), and Shirley Chisholm (1972) each challenged persistent barriers confronted by women presidential candidates.
Thursday, February 11, 2016 10:00 AM1:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Thursday, February 11, 2016 7:OO PM8:30 PM
Julie Wormser, Executive Director of The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA), will discuss how Boston is making hard decisions about equitably managing flood-prone areas. Policy makers and property owners must determine how to invest in vulnerable zones. How should they plan for future development as local weather extremes become increasingly unpredictable? If they do nothing, up to one-third of the city of Boston could flood regularly by 2100. Is it possible to balance Boston’s place-specific sea level rise challenges with opportunities to enhance the city’s vibrancy? This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities, the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise, and a new Earth conversation at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, February 13, 2016 2:00 PM5:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 5:00 PM8:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Thursday, February 18, 2016 12:00 PM1:00 PM
Since the first settlers arrived in New England in the 17th century, there has been movement and migration — first within New England, then to New York, the mid-west, and beyond. Understanding these migrations provides important context and a framework for anyone researching early New England and pioneer ancestors. This illustrated lecture will explain these population shifts, reasons for resettlement, and demographics, plus suggest a number of useful reference works.
Thursday, February 18, 2016 1:00 PM4:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Friday, February 19, 2016 12:00 PM3:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Sunday, February 21, 2016 2:00 PM6:00 PM
The New Bedford Historical Society hosts the 16th Annual community reading of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave (1845). This event is a celebration of the historical connection between the people of New Bedford and the young Douglass who found his way to the city as a 20-year old freedom seeker on the Underground Railroad.
Sunday, February 21, 2016 2:00 PM5:00 PM
The Chair City Community Art Center is a volunteer run workshop where first hand accounts from furniture workers are made into hand-printed, hand-bound books using old fashioned methods of bookmaking. We honor the people who made the product that defines Chair City, while bringing the community together around the production of the books. You are welcome to join us and learn this skill. Also, today you can drop in and join us to learn typesetting. Volunteers who donate at least 3 hours of their time can have a finished book. You don't need any special skills to volunteer. We will train you on the spot to make the books. You don't need to have worked in the furniture industry to get involved - all are welcome. If you did work in furniture industry, we want to give you a book and hear your story.
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 1:00 PM3:00 PM
This year Mass Humanities will award $400,000 in grants. Come learn more about our grant program and meet with our staff. Mass Humanities funds public programs that use history, literature, philosophy, and the other humanities disciplines to illuminate topics of interest and issues of concern to the people of Massachusetts. Mass Humanities welcomes proposals in all formats, exhibits, public conversations, walking tours, film and discussion, and more. Light refreshments will be served.
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 1:00 PM3:00 PM
This year Mass Humanities will award $400,000 in grants. Come learn more about our grant program and meet with our staff. Mass Humanities funds public programs that use history, literature, philosophy, and the other humanities disciplines to illuminate topics of interest and issues of concern to the people of Massachusetts. Mass Humanities welcomes proposals in all formats, exhibits, public conversations, walking tours, film and discussion, and more. Light refreshments will be served.
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Some stories keep us looking ahead. Call them pageturners, thrillers, tales of suspense. On the edge of our seats, we lean forward, hoping for a glimpse of what will happen next. The pleasure resides in that sweet spot between anticipation and uncertainty. Clark University professors Gino DiIorio (Theater), Jay Elliott (English), and Jennifer Plante (Writing Center) will select and read stories intended to keep us on edge. Please join us for this fun evening celebrating the beauty of language, the art of storytelling, and the desire for community. This event is sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 7:30 PM
Reading and talk by co-editors Erika DeSimone and Fidel Louis. Whether freeborn, self-liberated, or born in the years after the Emancipation, African Americans had a rich cultural heritage all their own in the 19th century. The editors of this collection of 150 poems—taken exclusively from America’s early black-owned newspapers—will share and celebrate a literary movement that until now has been largely ignored in American history. Copies of "Voices Beyond Bondage: An Anthology of Verse by African Americans of the 19th Century" will be available for purchase and signing after the talk.
Sunday, February 28, 2016 2:00 PM3:00 PM
A lecture by Kevin Sweeney, Professor of American Studies and History, Amherst College. Part of the 2016 Winter Lecture Series, "In Harm’s Way: Conflict and Captivity before the French and Indian War,” which commemorates the 312th anniversary of the 1704 raid on Deerfield by exploring conflicts, alliances and contested territories in the northeast throughout the later 17th and early 18th centuries. Four scholars will introduce individual and cultural perspectives as well as larger geopolitical issues in play before the (final) French and Indian War, expanding our understandings of these fascinating and important places and events, their antecedents, and their powerful legacies.
Monday, February 29, 2016 7:00 PM8:00 PM
Mass Humanities and Harvard Book Store welcomes DIANE REHM, host of WAMU's nationally-syndicated "The Diane Rehm Show," and fellow NPR broadcaster ROBIN YOUNG, co-host of WBUR's "Here & Now," for a discussion of Rehm's memoir, "On My Own." In a deeply personal and moving book, the beloved NPR radio host speaks out about the long drawn-out death (from Parkinson’s) of her husband of fifty-four years, and of her struggle to reconstruct her life without him.
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 4:00 PM5:30 PM
Humans now so dominate the world that we are transforming it profoundly. What are the consequences? To know the future, we must know the present, we must know the past, and we must know how to learn. Humans are adept at this, but sometimes the problems are so large they are impossible to solve. With earth-observing satellites and machine learning, however, we have the ingredients for geoEnvisioning — predicting and assessing future outcomes of human endeavors. Clark Labs and director J. Ronald Eastman will introduce us to the beauty and scientific potential of geoEnvisioning through an exhibition of images created using Geographic Information System and Image Processing software. Sponsored by Clark Labs and the Higgins School of Humanities at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, March 5, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 5, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 5, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 5, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 5, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 5, 2016 9:00 AMSunday, March 6, 2016 4:00 PM
Spend some time at OSV learning a historical craft. Formerly known as Crafts at Close Range, these adult workshops vary from blacksmithing to textiles, coopering, foodways, and more. Come and try your hand at a craft and take home your finished masterpiece! Unless otherwise specified, workshops will be held in the Museum Education building. This March, classes are available in Decorative Floorcloths, Rugs in the Shaker Spirit, Standing Wool Rugs, Making a Hussif, Housewife, or Workpocket, Hearth Cooking I, Planning an Heirloom Garden, Making a Blanket Chest/Hope Chest, Basic Blacksmithing, Introduction to Lettercarving in Stone, and Introduction to Basketmaking. Prices vary. Registration required.
Saturday, March 5, 2016 2:00 PM
Katherine Grandjean, an assistant professor of History at Wellesley College, joins us to present her new book, "American Passage: The Communications Frontier in Early New England". In a recent review, the Boston Globe explains, “In the 17th century… sending news was no simple affair. Traveling to another town could make for a slow and dangerous adventure. Going by water was difficult; in 1630, the boat of one Boston shoemaker bound for Plymouth took on so much icy water that its passengers had to make an emergency landing. (Several legs had to be amputated, as well.) Going by land, without any roads or reliable maps, was hardly better. There was no postal service, no newspapers, no regular conduit for sharing personal stories or political intrigue. In her new book, Katherine Grandjean reveals one surprising solution for the Colonists: Indian couriers.” We hope you can join us for what promises to be a fascinating presentation. Refreshments will be available at 1:30 and the lecture will begin at 2 p.m. This program is free and open to the public and co-sponsored by the Lydia Cobb-Quequechan Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
  • Old Colony History Museum, 66 Church Green
  • Taunton, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-822-1622
  • cost: FREE
Sunday, March 6, 2016 2:30 PM3:30 PM
Judith Kalaora, of History at Play, honors Christa McAuliffe during the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Teacher in Space program. Join the Framingham History Center as we celebrate Christa McAuliffe’s legacy with a journey through her life as a teacher, American pioneer, and internationally recognized heroine. The Framingham History Center is very excited and honored to be the first to present this portrayal of Christa. The one hour show will honor the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Teacher in Space Program and is also meant to coincide with the opening of the new McAuliffe Library in Nobscot. The program is suitable for ages 9+. Light refreshments will be served. Members $5/non-members $10 – Reservations required. Purchase tickets at www.framinghamhistory.org or mail checks to FHC PO Box 2032, Framingham, MA 01703.
Saturday, March 12, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 12, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 12, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 12, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 12, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
Afrofuturist feminism is a way of knowing and moving through the world. It is a strategy for naming and navigating complicated and often vexed histories and visions of the future — one that places people of color at the center and is fundamentally interested in transgressing conventional systems of power and dominance. In this talk, Professor Susana M. Morris will consider how Black women artists, such as Octavia Butler, Wangechi Mutu, and Janelle Monáe, use Afrofuturistic literature, art, and music as transgressive tools to fight oppression. This event is part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Office of the Provost at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street, Worcester
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, March 19, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 19, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 19, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 19, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, March 20, 2016 2:00 PM3:00 PM
A book by Lisa Brooks, Associate Professor of English and American Studies, Amherst College. Part of the 2016 Winter Lecture Series, "In Harm’s Way: Conflict and Captivity before the French and Indian War,” which commemorates the 312th anniversary of the 1704 raid on Deerfield by exploring conflicts, alliances and contested territories in the northeast throughout the later 17th and early 18th centuries. Four scholars will introduce individual and cultural perspectives as well as larger geopolitical issues in play before the (final) French and Indian War, expanding our understandings of these fascinating and important places and events, their antecedents, and their powerful legacies.
Sunday, March 20, 2016 2:00 PM5:30 PM
"Olde Coleraine" is Piti Theatre Co.'s musical theatre performance inspired by Hilltown history, circa 1869 - 1898 featuring a mixed cast of professional and community players of all ages with live music by Northampton singer-songwriter Carrie Ferguson. The performance is the first half of Piti's 7th annual SYRUP: One Sweet Performing Arts Festival and will be followed by Q&A with MH scholar Susan Tracy, professor of American History at Hampshire College and Piti Artistic Director Jonathan Mirin. Following intermission at 4 pm, VT puppeteer Sarah Frechette will present "The Snowflake Man" about farmer-scientist "Snowflake" Bentley which received puppetry's highest award - the UNIMA citation of excellence. Sarah will offer a pop-up puppet workshop after her show, advance registration suggested.
  • Memorial Hall, 51 Bridge Street
  • Shelburne Falls, Franklin County, MA (CT Valley)
  • contact: (413) 625-6569
  • web: www.ptco.org/syrup
  • email: info@ptco.org
  • cost: $12/$5 children 12 and under
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, March 26, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 2, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 2, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 2, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 2, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 2, 2016 8:30 AM3:30 PM
Essex Heritage will host scholars, educators, regional historic and cultural site staff and other interested community members to engage in public conversations about effective interpretation of northern slavery and its legacies. What are the stories related to these themes that our institutions are not telling? What are best practices models for approaching these topics with visitors, students, and the public? We will explore these and other questions via scholarly presentations, topic-specific break-out sessions, and facilitated activities.
  • Salem State University Veteran's Hall - Ellison Campus Center. If navigating via GPS to North Campus use 352 Lafayette Street
  • Salem, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 740-0444
  • web: www.essexheritage.org
  • cost: Free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Tuesday, April 5, 2016 7:00 PM8:30 PM
In modern capitalist economies, goods are bought and sold in the present, but delivered in the future. For centuries, this time lag has plagued commerce for the simple reason that it’s difficult to define the precise qualities of the commodity to be delivered down the line. Business historian Stephen Mihm will explain how the creation of standards and grades for a wide range of commodities solved this problem. These systems of standards have imposed an astonishing measure of uniformity on raw materials and are key to understanding how the world became modern, bound together by complex networks of exchange. This event is co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and the Departments of Economics and History at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street, Worcester
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Thursday, April 7, 2016 4:30 PM6:00 PM
Current discussions of partitioning Iraq and Syria emphasize that maps not only make geopolitical claims about territorial possession and knowledge, but also exert sociopolitical control. In this talk, Clark professor Lisa Kasmer (English) will explore cartographic history and mapping in nineteenth-century Britain to consider how the British nation exploited material representations of the empire to conceive of citizenship and rights. Professor James Murphy(Geography) will offer commentary. This is event is part of the Roots of Everything Lecture Series co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities and Early Modernists Unite at Clark University.
  • Clark University, Dana Commons - Higgins Lounge (2nd Flr), 36 Maywood Street, Worcester
  • Worcester, Worcester County, MA (Central)
  • contact: 508-793-7479
  • email: higginsschool@clarku.edu
  • cost: Free
Saturday, April 9, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 9, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 9, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 9, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 9, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 16, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: George Capaccio
  • Goodnow Library, 21 Concord Road
  • Sudbury, Middlesex County, MA (Metrowest Boston)
  • contact: (978) 440-5544
  • email: astimac@minlib.net
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 16, 2016 11:00 AM12:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Alicia Quintano
  • Swampscott Public Library, 61 Burrill Street
  • Swampscott, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (781) 596-8867
  • email: coughlin@noblenet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 16, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Jackson Gillman
  • Eldredge Public Library, 564 Main Street
  • Chatham, Barnstable County, MA (Cape & Islands)
  • contact: (508) 945-5174
  • email: tdepasquale@clamsnet.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 16, 2016 2:00 PM3:30 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Nicolette Heavey
  • Nevins Memorial Library, 305 Broadway
  • Methuen, Essex County, MA (Northeast)
  • contact: (978) 686-4080
  • email: kmoranwallace@mvlc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Saturday, April 16, 2016 10:00 AM4:00 PM
Revolutionary times come to life through reenactments, demonstrations, fife and drum muster, and a parade of new troops.
Thursday, April 21, 2016 7:00 PM
On February 18th, 1952 an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor’easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both fractured tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes. Of the 84 seamen aboard the tankers, 70 would be rescued and 14 would lose their lives. Michael Tougias, co-author of "The Finest Hours," joins us for our Annual Meeting and will use slides of the storm, the sinking tankers, the rescues, the victims, the survivors and the heroes to tell the story of this historic event. Tougias will describe the harrowing attempts to rescue the seamen. The waters along the outer arm of Cape Cod are called “the graveyard of the Atlantic” for good reason, yet this rescue defies all odds. A book signing will follow the program, and the presentation is suitable for all ages. Refreshments will be served at 6 p.m. The brief meeting to conduct the business of our Annual meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. and the lecture will begin at 7 p.m.
  • OCHM
  • Taunton, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: 508-822-1622
  • cost: FREE and open to the public
Saturday, April 23, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities
Sunday, April 24, 2016 2:00 PM3:00 PM
A lecture by by Michael Coe, Professor Emeritus, Yale University. Part of the 2016 Winter Lecture Series, "In Harm’s Way: Conflict and Captivity before the French and Indian War,” which commemorates the 312th anniversary of the 1704 raid on Deerfield by exploring conflicts, alliances and contested territories in the northeast throughout the later 17th and early 18th centuries. Four scholars will introduce individual and cultural perspectives as well as larger geopolitical issues in play before the (final) French and Indian War, expanding our understandings of these fascinating and important places and events, their antecedents, and their powerful legacies.
Saturday, May 7, 2016 10:30 AM12:00 PM
A humanities-based family reading program with 6 storyteller-led sessions in which children aged 6 to 10 and their parents or caregivers read and discuss engaging, multicultural picture books. Register at the library for the full series or drop in for any one event. Storyteller: Karen Chace
  • Somerset Public Library, 1464 County Street
  • Somerset, Bristol County, MA (Southeast)
  • contact: (508) 646-2829
  • email: cmatos@sailsinc.org
  • cost: free
  • funded by Mass Humanities

Exhibits

Saturday, February 28, 2015 9:30 AMTuesday, February 16, 2016 4:30 PM
A new exhibition in the lobby of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield, highlights the new design style that developed in mid-18th century France and England, referred to today as Neoclassicism, which harkened back to the shapes and ornaments of classical Greece and Rome. It eventually took hold in the United States as the Federal style, and can be seen in everything from architecture to furniture, emphasizing clean, geometric lines and more delicate Neoclassical detailing. Characteristic motifs of the Neoclassical style are frequent use of swags, festoons, ribbons, beading, vases, and urns. Neoclassical forms and decoration will be seen in objects in the exhibition that range from ceramics and card tables to needlework pictures and prints.
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 Sunday, March 20, 2016
The Lyman & Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History will host a photography exhibit featuring the work of William Hughes, who documented the “Faces of the North End,” a Springfield neighborhood that is home to many Latino Americans. The images will be selected by museum staff from a collection of photographs donated by the photographer for this purpose. Museum admission is free to Springfield residents. Come “meet and greet” photographer William Hughes on October 17th!
Tuesday, January 19, 2016 Wednesday, March 9, 2016
An exhibition drawn from the Historical Society’s Collection on the Abolition Movement and Underground Railroad in Fitchburg. Includes important pre-Civil War history from central Massachusetts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, February 27, 2016 Sunday, February 12, 2017
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts explores through more than 20 objects how nature has inspired, impressed, and enlightened society long before the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859. Using three themes, the exhibition explores the subject of flora and how it inspired the decorative arts. “Botanizing” looks at the movement to classify, study, and teach though a selection of educational books and prints detailing floral anatomy and stages of life. “Art in Nature” delves into the museum’s rich collection of decorative arts to see how plants and flowers have influenced designers and craftspeople in fields as diverse as textiles, ceramics, furniture, and architecture. Finally, “Bringing the Outdoors In” showcases ceramic and glass vessels which literally brought colorful and fragrant flowers and plants indoors for personal enjoyment and study.
Saturday, March 5, 2016 2:00 PM5:00 PM
This exhibit of photographs and bi-lingual text, curated by Waleska Santiago, Curator and Museum Educator, narrates stories of women in general, and Latinas in particular. It draws attention to concepts of family, challenges faced by grandmothers raising their families, gender expectations, and the connections between grandmothers and their adult grandchildren who reside in Holyoke. Visitors can chat with the curator, participants and scholars, and enjoy light refreshments at the opening event. If visitors bring their Abuela and are inspired, they can make use of recording equipment at the museum to capture a story about their special relationship. Snow date: Saturday, March 12
Saturday, March 5, 2016 Sunday, April 24, 2016
This exhibit of photographs and bi-lingual text, curated by Waleska Santiago, Curator and Museum Educator, narrates stories of women in general, and Latinas in particular. It draws attention to concepts of family, challenges faced by grandmothers raising their families, gender expectations, and the connections between grandmothers and their adult grandchildren who reside in Holyoke. Gallery viewing hours are Thursday and Friday 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from Noon to 4 p.m. with Free admission to the Gallery on Thursday.
Monday, April 4, 2016 Wednesday, May 25, 2016
A new exhibition on doctors, nurses, hospitals and medicine in Fitchburg. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday, June 20, 2016 Wednesday, August 17, 2016
A family-favorite tradition returns! Fitchburg-made Iver Johnson bicycles are on display, in one of the largest displays ever, within one mile of the factory where they were created. The Iver Johnson company made some of the most highly regarded racing and pleasure bikes in America, from the 1890’s till World War II. They were shipped from Fitchburg to Iver Johnson sporting goods stores all over the world. These historic bikes have been loaned by local collectors and restoration experts. Open Mondays and Tuesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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